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Why do Americans like Bobby Fischer?


  • 3 years ago · #121

    raul72

    waffllemaster wrote:
    SerbianChessStar wrote:
    hyperniko wrote:

    i have books of Bobby Fisher for I have admired him as a chess champion, but like most of us, am very sad about his personality.


    I dont know whats up about these books, but I thought someone else published them not fischer?


    60 memorable games is his... I believe any others were written for him and just used his name.


     Well, there weren't that many Fischer books. Fischer would never put his name on a book written by someone else---why--Because it would be inferior to anything Fischer would write.

    Vanity---thy name is Fischer!    CASE CLOSED

  • 3 years ago · #122

    orthodude

    Ha ha I get it there was Erasums,foe of Luther,first professional writer,and there's you brasmus. Answer me this clever fellow, was Fischer mad or was he a fool? Is madness just foolishness or visa versa?

  • 3 years ago · #123

    chompman2

    Caliphigia wrote:

    I think this is intentionaly provoking question, so I would advise all Americans to hold their horses.

    Well that's all very well, but how many Americans own horses.

  • 3 years ago · #124

    orthodude

    I was trying to take this into an alternative direction. Without a doubt, chess is a fight. But I don't think you understand what the fight is all about. Rationality vs. Empiricism.  

    Conservatism is a critique of the preservation of value; libralism a critique on its accessability.

    There had to be a holocaust to give WWII a good vs. evil myth.

    A similar focus could have been made about the pagan/occult roots of the nazi party.  Hitler didn't invent anti-semetism. His hatred of the Jews was no different from your hatred of librals.

  • 3 years ago · #125

    orthodude

     Hey C2212: thanks for the response.It had a light-hearted touch.The key for chess players is disspassionate analyses.Nimzovitch warns us that we can't be happy about everything all the time.It's time for putting emotions in the box ; embrace the threat and solve it.

  • 3 years ago · #126

    iksarol

    he was on drugs while playing , he wouldnt have been able to play a single tour game today. He needed the drugs to function due to his mentall illness

  • 3 years ago · #127

    EternalChess

    He wasnt on drugs?

  • 3 years ago · #128

    goldendog

    No, there's no evidence for this.

  • 3 years ago · #129

    beardogjones

    Uptight??? Who's uptight!

  • 3 years ago · #130

    scut_fargus

    If he wasn't on drugs ( which he wasn't) he should have been.  Maybe he would have been a happier and nicer person.  But remember drugs are bad so if you have any get rid of them. Send them to me and I will properly dispose of them.  

  • 3 years ago · #131

    dannyhume

    It's like asking why Iraqi's living in Iraq prefer Saddam Hussein over U.S. invasion/occupation. 

  • 3 years ago · #132

    Ubik42

    dannyhume wrote:

    It's like asking why Iraqi's living in Iraq prefer Saddam Hussein over U.S. invasion/occupation. 


     Stockholm syndrome?

  • 3 years ago · #133

    EternalChess

    Well if he was offered drugs for his illness, he would have called Doctors JEWS and killers for attempting to "murder" Fischer.

  • 3 years ago · #134

    orthodude

    Drugs. What a red herring. People who haven't done drugs shouldn't spout off about them.

  • 3 years ago · #135

    chompman2

    orthodude wrote:

    Drugs. What a red herring. People who haven't done drugs shouldn't spout off about them.


    My grandmother used to smoke red herrings - but she never injected them.

  • 3 years ago · #136

    EricDodson

    Americans like Fischer first because he was a consumate artist of the chess board, but also because his ascendancy to the world championship seemed to embody an ethic of individual effort and individual genius -- especially in contrast to the more collectivist Soviet approach to chess.  Many Americans are willing to forgive Fischer's outlandishness because they don't really expect great artists to also be outstanding exemplars of morality and sensibility in the first place. Consequently, many Americans are inclined to view Fischer's opinions as just that -- mere opinions, rather than as indelible stains on his legacy and constributions to chess.          

  • 3 years ago · #137

    GhostNight

    Very Good reply Eric!  I totally agree! You are one of the few that  post here  has real meaning, and not personal prejudice attacks against a great man! Thank you!

  • 3 years ago · #138

    AndyClifton

    GhostNight wrote:

    Very Good reply Eric!  I totally agree! You are one of the few that  post here  has real meaning, and not personal prejudice attacks against a great man! Thank you!


    In other words..."I agree with you" (heehee!).

  • 3 years ago · #139

    trysts

    GhostNight wrote:

    Very Good reply Eric!  I totally agree! You are one of the few that  post here  has real meaning, and not personal prejudice attacks against a great man! Thank you!


    "Great man", my buttLaughing

  • 3 years ago · #140

    AndyClifton

    How about "Great butt, my man!"


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