Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Wind Mill

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #1


    Anyone knows what is a windmill and has some examles of it?

    on wikipedia this is what they have:

    Windmill (chess)


    Torre-Repetto vs Lasker, Moscow International Tournament, 1925
    Image:chess zhor 26.png
    Image:chess zver 26.png a8 rd b8 c8 d8 e8 rd f8 nd g8 kd h8 Image:chess zver 26.png
    a7 pd b7 bd c7 d7 e7 f7 pd g7 pd h7
    a6 b6 c6 d6 pd e6 pd f6 g6 h6 pd
    a5 b5 qd c5 d5 e5 f5 g5 bl h5 ql
    a4 b4 pl c4 d4 pl e4 f4 g4 h4
    a3 b3 c3 d3 e3 nl f3 g3 rl h3
    a2 pl b2 c2 d2 e2 f2 pl g2 pl h2 pl
    a1 b1 c1 d1 e1 rl f1 g1 kl h1
    Image:chess zhor 26.png
    White plays 25. Bf6!, sacrificing his queen in order to set up the windmill, and ends up ahead in material.

    In chess, a windmill is a tactic in which a combination of discovered checks and regular checks, usually by a rook and a bishop, can win massive amounts of material. This tactic is also sometimes referred to as a see-saw. In the game pictured at right, Carlos Torre-Repetto makes use of the windmill tactic against Emanuel Lasker to win two pawns and a bishop and enter into a winning endgame (although the bishop had to be given back). The move 25. Bf6!, hanging the queen, sets up the windmill. Black must accept the sacrifice, as his own queen is unprotected, and any attempt to stop the windmill would simply give White the queen. Then 25. ...Qxh5 26. Rxg7+ Kh8 27. Rxf7+ Discovered check, by the bishop. White simply repeats the regular check/discovered check pattern, taking as many pieces as he can with his rook. 27. ...Kg8 28. Rg7+ Kh8 29. Rxb7+ Kg8 30. Rg7+ Kh8 31. Rg5+ Kh7 32. Rxh5 White concludes the windmill by taking the black queen.

    This is great but I would like a better explination of this?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2


    I don't understand how to better explain it. It says exactly what it is and gives a prime example. What more do you want?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3


    well I guess it explains perfectly but another example would be helpful

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4


    It's an extremely rare tactic that is not neccesarily worth knowing from a practical standpoint but quite pleasing from an aesthetic and pure chess enjoyment point of view. It involves an opponent's king who is forced to move back and forth between two squares with a piece (usually rook) delivering a discovered check every other move to gain a tempo in capturing an opposing piece and then returning to the original position. This is my attempt to explain it, sorry if it is not worded well enough, I'm not much of a chess instructor Laughing. I was wondering if anyone could find a windmall tactic using a knight.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5


    it is still good thanks

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6


    1. Qxg7+ Nxg7+ 2. Rxg7+ and then the familiar ordeal back and forth along the 7th rank

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7


    thanks but shouldnt the knight be at e8?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8


    There was supposed to be an additional knight on f5 actually, you're right

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #9


    Surprised ok

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #10


    Carlos Torre was the greatest player Mexico ever produced...

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #11


    This is a visual example of a Windmill. 

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #12


    arounda and arounda

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #13


    I would hate to have someone pull that on me. Can you imagine seeing all you material dissapear like that?

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #14


    yes, that technique, i love that.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #15


    another example:


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #16


    wind mill.

    mind will.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #17


    That is pretty.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #18


    did anyone like mah example?

Back to Top

Post your reply: