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Would you rather win a bad game or lose a good one?


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #41

    DavidStyles

    Elubas, not sure if your comment is directed to me, but if I understand your intention correctly then I agree with it, in any case.

    I'd call anything that fulfils the classification requirements of "animal" as an animal, and I make no value judgements about that. I simply call a thing what it is.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #42

    dmxn2k

    If for the rest of my dear life
    If all I had were games so bad
    And I won ev'ry one of them
    I'd be content.

     

    I'd play until I beat the world
    I'd know I'd played the best
    And to those chaps who would complain
    I'd simply say

    I beat them all; I did it my way.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #43

    Wasp_Enterprises

    I've played a lot against bad chess players at school, and I always feel sorry for them. 

    When I play with my good chess-playing friends, we have excellent games and it's really fun to play. 

    So I choose the latter. 

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #44

    royalbishop

    DavidStyles wrote:

    Elubas, not sure if your comment is directed to me, but if I understand your intention correctly then I agree with it, in any case.

    I'd call anything that fulfils the classification requirements of "animal" as an animal, and I make no value judgements about that. I simply call a thing what it is.

    Hey your smart.

    Elubas knowns how to use the Vulcan Mind Melt. Your ways will be his ways. Your mind to his mind. It appears he has gotten stronger at doing it. Last time i checked he was real good at to the point that i had to admit it. Which is a first ever.


     

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #45

    oz101

    I would lose a good game.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #46

    MelvinDoucet

    I'd draw a drawish game.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #47

    royalbishop

    MelvinDoucet wrote:

    I'd draw a drawish game.

    When i first started playing chess i learned how to draw games and became a draw master. Then got stronger and moved onto converting to wins before the option for a draw was on the table.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #48

    chasm1995

    rupert2112 wrote:
    royalbishop wrote:
    rupert2112 wrote:

    A game of chess should result in a draw if both parties are indeed aiming for perfection.  

    A win in master level chess is like a dance where one skilled dancer might misses a step, often imperceptible to spectators.   The vast majority of chess play better resembles two drunkards aimlessly stumbling across the dance floor.

     

    Ok. Can we get a photo of you stumbling across the dance floor. You said it not me.

    With or without the lamp shade? 

    Both.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #49

    royalbishop

    Both you say.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #50

    shepi13

    At my level, if I lose a game, it wasn't a good one Frown.

    Sadly, even if I win a game, it still wasn't a good one. Cry

    So I guess I would rather win a bad game, as my only other option is losing a bad game, and I see no reason to play for a loss.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #51

    chasm1995

    @royalbishop: Why not?  You can't tell which one will be more enjoyable either due to humor or amusement without seeing both.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #52

    SmyslovFan

    Coaches in various sports such as tennis and American football have long stated that while everybody loves to win, what separates champions from everyone else is how much you hate to lose. 

    There are plenty of pertinent aphorisms, such as "show me a good loser and I'll show you a loser". Losing at chess is painful. I'd rather suffer a "bad" win than a good loss. I may not remember the wins, but my losses, no matter how well I played, are painful.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #53

    Ubik42

    Just once, I want to see someone win, and then hurl the pieces to the ground and go storming out of the tournament hall.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #54

    Estragon

    Obviously in a tournament for prizes or qualification, the prize forces the competitor to choose winning the bad game.

    But if you assume the outcome of the game has no effect on prizes, Gran Prix standings, etc., that it is a game without consequences beyond its own conclusion, I would much prefer to have invested my time losing a good game than winning a poor one. 

     

    Those losses hurt just as badly or even more than others, but I would still rather endure the pain of showing a very good game I lost than waste your time with a win without merit or interest.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #55

    PIRATCH

    In chess you always win! Cool
    Either you win the game or you get more experienced! Wink

    You defenitely learn more from your lost games. Therefore playing well and losing will be good for deep analysis.

    In a tournament of course I'll rather take the undeserved win. It only rarely happens to me! Innocent

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #56

    OldChessDog

    It's better to lose a good game rather than to win a bad one. There is next to nothing to learn from winning a bad game--usually plenty to learn from losing a good one.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #57

    bestchessplayer18

    You can always learn from your losses.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #58

    YABOYBREEZ2012

    hmm....win 

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #59

    TetsuoShima

    HotFlow wrote:

    Considering most of us here are at mediocre level, myself included of course.  The outcomes of our games/tournaments win/lose/draw are hardly going to have any meaningful significance.  I'm somewhat surprised by emphasis thats being afforded.  Thus the only quantifiable derivative from such undertakings is our own personnel enjoyment.

    i think thats a really bad atitude, what if all great people in history would have thought so... even though we never be anything more then mediocre not giving the best and strive for the best is a sin in my opinion

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #60

    royalbishop

    OldChessDog wrote:

    It's better to lose a good game rather than to win a bad one. There is next to nothing to learn from winning a bad game--usually plenty to learn from losing a good one.

    This is one of my perspectives of it. It is hard to think about taking time to study a game that was won compared to wondering why we lose a game.


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