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Malware


  • 21 months ago · Quote · #21

    LoekBergman

    There is a vast and interesting segment using Linux: the majority of the internet servers have Linux as their OS.

    The desktops for Suse and Ubuntu are quite well. I never had any big problems using hardware, but I am not using very sophisticated or hype sensitive things nor am I gaming otherwise then playing chess. Linux has its security issues as well, it is not safe to think that you are safe because you use Linux. Technology alone is not enough, because that is security based on obscurity. You will definitely be more secure when you use Slackware then Windows or the Mac, but it does not mean that your behaviour can not be tracked using cookies and the like nor that your computer can not serve as an email server for spam.

    Security and internet are like black and white: they are opposites with a lot of grey nuances in between. Your behavior is very important with regards to the security of your computer - I do not want to imply that the original requester of this topic is behaving insecure -, but it is just like walking in an unknown city: if you stay out of the obvious dangerous places, you are probably much safer. Buying on the internet, downloading movies or trailers, opening all kinds of email, using cracks for some programs are all more or less unsafe behaviour.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #22

    CaptainPike

    Linux is more stable and it is more secure. Something to do with the myriad of disk partitions which act as a barrier from one part of the OS to another, making it more difficult for viruses to spread.

    Another point, though, dealing with both Linux and Mac, is this: Microsoft (for better or for worse) is the "big boy on the block" and everyone wants to pick on the big guy. I believe this is a major reason why we have so many viruses targeting Microsoft OS; they're the ones everyone wants to beat.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #23

    Timothy_P

    CaptainPike wrote:

    Linux is more stable and it is more secure. Something to do with the myriad of disk partitions which act as a barrier from one part of the OS to another, making it more difficult for viruses to spread.

    Another point, though, dealing with both Linux and Mac, is this: Microsoft (for better or for worse) is the "big boy on the block" and everyone wants to pick on the big guy. I believe this is a major reason why we have so many viruses targeting Microsoft OS; they're the ones everyone wants to beat.

    Possibly true, but I think the motive is simpler than that. There are far more PC's in use AND PC's are more vulnerable, so PCs are the easiest and most profitable targets.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #24

    CM87K

    I use FreeBSD, and have not had any security problems :D

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #25

    LoekBergman

    Disk partitioning has nothing to do with any difficulty for viruses to spread itself. The major feature of Linux OS is that any programs is running as an user. That user is allowed to do some things and other things not. When a virus is entering a Linux program, then will that act as the user, who is executing it. If that user happened to be root (aka superuser) then can the virus do anything it wants, but when it runs as an ordinairy user, then will it not be as powerfull. It might not even being able to execute itself.

    Windows is much more benign for people who are not familiar with the internals of a computer. When you really want to profit from Linux, then must you delve into how it all works. Hence might you say that the OS of Linux means Open Source, whereas the OS of Windows means Open System.

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #26

    Conquistador

    Well if you are comparing to Windows Vista...

  • 21 months ago · Quote · #27

    NimzoRoy

    According to what I've read one of the main virus problems for MACs is that they can download Windows viruses, which can then  infect  Windows software if any is used. If none is used I'm not convinced MACs are immune from MAC malware and I'm guessing there are MAC AV programs that aren't resource hogs, so why not run one?


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