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Action chess tourney yesterday


  • 22 months ago · Quote · #41

    Elubas

    I dunno, .47 is a pretty nice advantage. Not losing, but not particularly pleasant to play against almost anyone.

    I kind of like how you have all of these deep ideas in your 3 0 games. I literally just try not to hang pieces. If I somehow achieve that, I'm happy.

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #42

    solskytz

    It's true, Elubas... quite a lot passes through my mind when I play - also in fast tempi... sometimes when I actually start writing it down it surprises me how much thought and ideas you can condense into a unit of time...

    And very true about the .47 - although it depends on the position, and sometimes computers don't really understand what they're talking about with regards to these elusive positionally-numerical evaluations... by the way I didn't really check Houdini to see its evaluation at that point... just kind of tried to imagine what it would be...

  • 22 months ago · Quote · #43

    solskytz

    gut feeling... probably my comment after his move 21 was right on - as now that I look at it, 22. Bc7+ would have probably won the game - 22...Kc8 would cost his queen after 23. Nb6, and on other answers, the combination of a knight on b6 and a queen on f2, with checks each time, looks lethal - and more specifically, would either win the Queen or lead to that Kramnik bitter end, described a bit further in the notes. 

    Qg3, a3 and obviously Qf2 (without check) utterly miss the point - and he manages finally to breathe a little through ...Bxd5. 

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #44

    zenomorphy

    Hey solskytz! I use to think playing the Sicilian Alapin was akin to dereliction of duty with the White pieces. After a few successes, in a lame attempt (admittedly) to dodge very sharp lines my friend occasionally clubed me with like a baby Harp Seal, I kinda evolved a penchant for certain lines. Overall, you definitely have keen vision in shorter time controls. Enjoyed the games!

    Fun games.  BTW, ...I assume Doggy_Style meant to say (above) that ...Black gets open lines, easy development and plenty of ready-made plans to pursue, consistent with his previous assessment of c3 (and the Alapin, for that matter), as a dodge of the open Sicilian. All good though. Peace solskytz!

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #45

    Doggy_Style

    zenomorphy wrote:

    I assume Doggy_Style meant to say (above) that ...Black gets open lines, easy development and plenty of ready-made plans to pursue, consistent with his previous assessment of c3 (and the Alapin, for that matter), as a dodge of the open Sicilian. All good though. Peace solskytz!

    Nope, I meant exactly what I said. Maybe you've lost the context.

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #46

    zenomorphy

    Copy that. Reread and follow what you meant & agree.  As an e4 player, playing directly into the Open Sicilian obtains said advantages, rather than trotting out c3, Alapin. Most players eventually get it out of their systems for such reasons (the Alapin), I think, ...as best winning chances, having played e4 in the first place as White, into the Sicilian, come from playing into main lines. Am I correct? The great Lev Polugaevsky series, The Sicilian Labyrinth confirmed this for me, converting my thinking long ago. 

    Peace

  • 16 months ago · Quote · #47

    zenomorphy

    BTW, I truly believe, if one aspires to be a serious tournament player (online Bullet & Blitz aside, ...another debate leading to often declining speed & age issues for many, ...darn mouse), and love to play e4 meeting & beating Sicilian players; ...or perhaps you're a great Sicilian aficionado as Black (c5, still the highest eco winning percentage against e4), the remargable Lev Polugaevsky series, The Sicilian Labyrinth is truly transformative.  He was a surely one of the games greatest teachers. The chess world suffered a hugh loss, the day he passed.  I believe, as do many players, The Sicilian Labyrinth was his finest and most significant contribution to the chess world and a must-have for your chess library (if you can get your hands on them ;'). I used to muse at how players would sometimes chuckle at 2.c3.  After reading these books, I got it. Peace.

  • 15 months ago · Quote · #48

    solskytz

    Good to know - I'll take a note of that - The Sicilian Labyrinth, by Polugaevsky. Thank you guys!


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