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Do You See Checkmate?


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #41

    Scottrf

    It's not a mate in 3, or 5 as far as I can see.



  • 20 months ago · Quote · #42

    jbird39

    Scottrf is right. Kd7 is the fly in the ointment.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #43

    PortlandPatzer

    was looking at the text in Italian and apparently it gives a solution for 5 moves instead of 3. Perhaps there is something else there?

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #44

    eddysallin

    jbird39 wrote:

    Scottrf is right. Kd7 is the fly in the ointment.

    rc8,kd7,rxq+,rxr,qe7 mat2

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #45

    eddysallin

    Scottrf wrote:

    It's not a mate in 3, or 5 as far as I can see.

    YOUR RIGHT.....

    I stand corrected,thks. After kc6 b. is lost so continuations are not important.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #46

    Musikamole

    Scottrf wrote:

    Second one is a beauty.


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     Yes. It is a beauty, seeing that Black has the bishop pair on an open board, White is down an entire piece, and sacrifices his queen for mate. I mean, who wouldn't want to have a game end like that! Cool


    BTW - You posted a very nice puzzle. Clever stuff. I saved it to my puzzle folder. Thanks! Smile

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    I wonder if someone could reverse engineer this problem, approximate an opening that would lead to this puzzle? There might not be enough information in this puzzle to do it, but it would be very cool to see what miniature game this puzzle came from.

    Fred Reinfeld does not list the games in the back, but the answers are in descriptive notation, and I am having no trouble with it. I thought descriptive notation would be hard to learn. Knowing that it is no big deal, I can now reconsider a few other classic books that are still in descriptive notation.

    Example of descriptive notation: 1. QxBPch! RxQ 2. R-K8ch R-B1 3.RxRch KxR 4.R-K8 mate. Descriptive notation reminds me of an old James Bond film, forget which one, where there is a chess game, and you here things like Rook to Bishop 1.

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #47

    Musikamole

    I just did my first Chess.com Tactics Trainer problem for the day, and got it wrong. Puzzles like this drive me nuts. A 15 move sequence, rated at only 1225 (?),  to win material more than a pawn. Geez! Good Luck. 


  • 20 months ago · Quote · #49

    eddysallin

    pfren wrote:

    White has one hundred ways to win. The only thing he should avoid is the cheapo trap 1.Rh4 Kg8 2.Rxh5? Rh1+! with a draw.

    Most would not see this....u sure play this game !

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #50

    lllllllll8888888

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 20 months ago · Quote · #51

    Musikamole

    pfren wrote:

    White has one hundred ways to win. The only thing he should avoid is the cheapo trap 1.Rh4 Kg8 2.Rxh5? Rh1+! with a draw.

    Ahh...to have board vision like that!

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #52

    Sunshiny

    eddysallin wrote:
    pfren wrote:

    White has one hundred ways to win. The only thing he should avoid is the cheapo trap 1.Rh4 Kg8 2.Rxh5? Rh1+! with a draw.

    Most would not see this....u sure play this game !

    That IM doesn't stand for I'm or I am. Wink

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #53

    CharronSeb

    1) 1-2 minutes

    2)guess Rc2-C8

    ... after some thinking i tried with a cpu... only to get +16,97 in 16 move calculation

  • 20 months ago · Quote · #54

    eddysallin

    Musikamole wrote:
    Scottrf wrote:

    Second one is a beauty.


     nc7+,kf8,qd8+,bxq,re8 mate

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     


     Yes. It is a beauty, seeing that Black has the bishop pair on an open board, White is down an entire piece, and sacrifices his queen for mate. I mean, who wouldn't want to have a game end like that!


    BTW - You posted a very nice puzzle. Clever stuff. I saved it to my puzzle folder. Thanks!

    --------

    I wonder if someone could reverse engineer this problem, approximate an opening that would lead to this puzzle? There might not be enough information in this puzzle to do it, but it would be very cool to see what miniature game this puzzle came from.

    Fred Reinfeld does not list the games in the back, but the answers are in descriptive notation, and I am having no trouble with it. I thought descriptive notation would be hard to learn. Knowing that it is no big deal, I can now reconsider a few other classic books that are still in descriptive notation.

    Example of descriptive notation: 1. QxBPch! RxQ 2. R-K8ch R-B1 3.RxRch KxR 4.R-K8 mate. Descriptive notation reminds me of an old James Bond film, forget which one, where there is a chess game, and you here things like Rook to Bishop 1.


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