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Strange Puzzle


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    1stMoveWillBeD4orC5

     I found it really strage at first, but it turned out to be a textbook puzzle. 
     
    See if you can figure this one out...
     
     
     This actually happened during my previous game.
    I guess practicing tactics really pays off! 
     

     
    And here's the actual game:
     
     
    Above tactic at move 23. See if you like the rook sacrifice near the end. Wink
     
  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    yourChess

    The puzzle was actually easy.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    Hydra

    thought it was quite easy, but yes its a good puzzle as it is a situation that i find my self in quite a few times.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    1stMoveWillBeD4orC5

    Yes, the important thing is to understand that if you fork immediately after he takes your bishop, he will eat your rook behind the bishop and you don't win anything. 

    The trick is then to move that rook away without losing a move, and that's done by moving it to check their king, and then they will waste their moving their king away. After that you are free to attack both rooks with your bishop and exchange your bishop for their rook.

    Practicing tactical puzzles is one thing, but it feels great when sWinkomething like this actually happens in the game and you solve it then. Especially when it involves outsmarting the opponent's tactic with your own tactic.

    Have you ever found tactical puzzles in your own games?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    stephen_33

    Why 'strange' ?  I agree with the comments above that the solution is fairly obvious once you see that no mate is possible - just the application of good tactics.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    StrategicPlay

    1stMoveWillBeD4orC5 (3989) ???

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    1stMoveWillBeD4orC5

    That was a joke.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    stephen_33

    Just took another look at your game - I assume you use the term 'rook sacrifice' (move 39) tonge in cheek ? I can't see any strategic advantage gained but I keep an open mind.
    Wouldn't 39.Rf7 have been preferable - it forces black to abandon the pawn on d3 & allows you to trash black's kingside pawns in time.

    All credit to you for winning the game but I think your opponent made an error on move 49. If they had played 49...Kb3 instead of b4, then I can't find any way of stopping the a-file pawn promotion. It completely turns the game around.
    Any thoughts ? 

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #9

    -waller-

    Quite a useful one, thanks. It's one that definitely requires a bit of calculation and isn't spectacular (and I always think the spectacular ones are the easiest!) I wouldn't say this is the "easiest".

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #10

    zoom2me

    good one.. but easy.. just need to find the right capture and order of events..

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #11

    DaBigOne

    Is there such thing as a positional puzzle? And if so, can someone show an example?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #12

    tolikid

    I think moving 38.Re5+...39.Rf5 taking the bishop is more better then 38.Re7...

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #13

    martinguna

    this is some what easy

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #14

    waffllemaster

    DaBigOne wrote:

    Is there such thing as a positional puzzle? And if so, can someone show an example?

    Chess Caffe Puzzle Book 2 by Muller is a positional puzzle book.  I got it and not sure I like it... look it up on amazon, one of the only reviews there does a good job of explaining it.

    However IMO all tactics puzzles (that aren't elementary) are positional in nature too.  For example any puzzle where you sacrifice anything is positional in nature.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #15

    StrategicPlay

    I have a feeling that the Rook sacrifice was a blunder, not really deflection or anything. You could've won without that too.

    50. ... Bxh3 was the game-changer. That was the biggest blunder ever.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #16

    DaBigOne

    waffllemaster wrote:
    DaBigOne wrote:

    Is there such thing as a positional puzzle? And if so, can someone show an example?

    Chess Caffe Puzzle Book 2 by Muller is a positional puzzle book.  I got it and not sure I like it... look it up on amazon, one of the only reviews there does a good job of explaining it.

    However IMO all tactics puzzles (that aren't elementary) are positional in nature too.  For example any puzzle where you sacrifice anything is positional in nature.

    No, I mean not a puzzle where you sac to win, or gain material because most are easy.

    What I mean is a puzzle that has an end result of a technically winning game.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #17

    knightofcrashtest

    Not the easiest... But I've definetly seen harder.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #18

    knightofcrashtest

    DaBigOne wrote:
    waffllemaster wrote:
    DaBigOne wrote:

    Is there such thing as a positional puzzle? And if so, can someone show an example?

    Chess Caffe Puzzle Book 2 by Muller is a positional puzzle book.  I got it and not sure I like it... look it up on amazon, one of the only reviews there does a good job of explaining it.

    However IMO all tactics puzzles (that aren't elementary) are positional in nature too.  For example any puzzle where you sacrifice anything is positional in nature.

    No, I mean not a puzzle where you sac to win, or gain material because most are easy.

    What I mean is a puzzle that has an end result of a technically winning game.

    Tactical puzzles are classics. It depends on what you mean by positional: Positional puzzles I've played are mostly in the early middle-game, and they usually set up for an unavoidable tactic. In my opinion, positional puzzles make you do moves that do not require as much or no taking in checking. These are extremely important puzzles for openings, I think.


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