Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

The Beatles or The Rolling Stones or who ? ( or even the Who ? )


  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1221

    batgirl

    Shakaali wrote:

    Isley's ain't the original. This one is: https://youtu.be/LsDpc-8iR8g

    However, for me The Beatles own this song. Maybe the finest example of John singing rock'n roll.

    Wow. Thanks, Shakaali. That was totally cool. I'd never heard of the Top Notes. It's equally fascinationg to learn the song was produced my Phil Spector.


    So, the Isleys  was the first cover?  Actually, the Isley's turned the song inside out, chewed it up and spat out a completely original take  while the Beatles were pretty faithful to the Isley's version.

    "Twist and Shout" indeed showcased Lennon's rock n roll voice, but I prefer his cover of Chuck Berry's "Rock and Roll Music" a shade more.  John was definitey a rocker at heart.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1222

    AlCzervik

    One of the battles they had was that John was a rocker (as batgirl mentions), and Paul was more of a ballad guy.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1223

    batgirl

    I know Paul loved show tunes and music from a decade earlier and a lot of his songs reflect that. But Paul could also take a Little Richard song and own it completely.

    I just listened to a Who and a Springsteen cover of "Twist and Shout" and wasn't overly impressed.  The I listened the the Who covering "Barbara Ann" and believe me, the Beach Boys weren't shaking in their boots.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1224

    kaynight

    Roger Daltry moved on after The Who. He won acclaim as an actor. Recently he " jammed" at a wedding reception in Scotland. Fortunately the band could play a Who song. What a memory for the happy couple.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1225

    Shakaali

    batgirl wrote:


    So, the Isleys  was the first cover? 


    Probably yes but not sure. Wikipedia lists the Isleys version as the first hit recording. It also says that Bert Russel, one of the original writers, felt that Spector had ruined the song with his production and produced the Isleys version himself to show how it should be doneSmile

    Obviously this was before Spector developped his signature wall of sound.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1226

    batgirl

    Yeah, it seems Spector was just on this way up at this point. He was only 22.  I like the Isley's verion much better than the original, so maybe Bert Russel was right.

    Spector was a performer himself and he supposedly experimented with production techniqsue even in the 1950 when he was a teenager.  Too bad about his tragic life.

    I'd never explored this aspect of early rock n roll. Thanks for bringing it up.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1227

    JamieDelarosa

    Paul wrote his fair share of "rockers" - "Smile Away," off of the Ram album: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNt9X1i1g4Q

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1228

    batgirl

    Well, "Helter Skelter" or "I Saw Her Standing There" comes to mind.

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1229

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks a lot for all of these recent posts. 

  • 4 weeks ago · Quote · #1230

    AlCzervik

    JamieDelarosa wrote:

    Paul wrote his fair share of "rockers" - "Smile Away," off of the Ram album: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNt9X1i1g4Q

    You're such a tool.

    Of course he did-over his career. When the Beatles were formed, Paul wasn't a rocker.

    Thanks for the link, though, of a song he did post-Beatles.

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1231

    varelse1

    JamieDelarosa wrote:

    Paul wrote his fair share of "rockers" - "Smile Away," off of the Ram album: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNt9X1i1g4Q

    Paul also wrote this. The biggest rocker of the entire 007 series:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IqdqAAzjgDE

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1232

    Shakaali

    AlCzervik wrote:
    JamieDelarosa wrote:

    Paul wrote his fair share of "rockers" - "Smile Away," off of the Ram album: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xNt9X1i1g4Q

    You're such a tool.

    Of course he did-over his career. When the Beatles were formed, Paul wasn't a rocker.

    Thanks for the link, though, of a song he did post-Beatles.

    Why can't you just disagree with her without the added insults?

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1233

    kaynight

    It's obligatory on this site.

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1234

    Eseles

    Here's a great cover of a Dylan song for you guys

  • 3 weeks ago · Quote · #1235

    varelse1

    A thought just occured to me this very moment. Is it possible Bob Dylan's Tangled up in Blue was the inspiration for the Forrest Gump storyline?

    The similarities I'm seeing include:

    A couple in an on-again/off-again relationship.

    I helped her out of a jam, I guess
    But I used a little too much force

    Forrest did that, several times.

    We drove that car as far as we could
    Abandoned it out West
    Split up on a dark sad night
    Both agreeing it was best

    She turned around to look at me
    As I was walkin’ away
    I heard her say over my shoulder
    “We’ll meet again someday on the avenue”


    Reminds me of the scene on the bridge, where Forrest announced he was being sent to Vietnam. Or the scene in Washington DC, where Jenny was getting on the bus.

    I had a job in the great north woods
    Working as a cook for a spell
    But I never did like it all that much
    And one day the ax just fell
    So I drifted down to New Orleans
    Where I happened to be employed
    Workin’ for a while on a fishin’ boat
    Right outside of Delacroix

    Forrest drifted from job to job. Much like a feather on the wind. And one of those jobs included shrimping in the Gulf.

    But all the while I was alone
    The past was close behind
    I seen a lot of women
    But she never escaped my mind, and I just grew

    Forrest spent much of his time thinking about Jenny. And much more trying NOT to think about her.

    She was workin’ in a topless place
    And I stopped in for a beer

    Jenny had a job in a topless bar.

    I lived with them on Montague Street
    In a basement down the stairs
    There was music in the cafés at night
    And revolution in the air

    The "Revolution in the air" reminds me of the Black Panther scene.

    Then he started into dealing with slaves
    And something inside of him died
    She had to sell everything she owned
    And froze up inside

    Sounds much like the problems Jenny was having in her other relationships. Driving her to the verge of suicide at one point.

    And when finally the bottom fell out
    I became withdrawn
    The only thing I knew how to do
    Was to keep on keepin’ on like a bird that flew

    And here, I am reminded of Forrest running across America, non-stop, after Jenny walked out on him. Trying to forget the past.

    So now I’m goin’ back again
    I got to get to her somehow
    All the people we used to know
    They’re an illusion to me now

    And here, I am reminded of Forrest on the bus bench. From where he narrated the film. waiting to see Jenny once again.

    Sorry it was so long. I kept noticing more similarities while I typed. 

    What do you guys think? Is this strikingly similar?

  • 2 weeks ago · Quote · #1236

    cabadenwurt

    Thanks for the recent posts. 

  • 11 days ago · Quote · #1237

    varelse1

    I used to think the Hokey-Pokey was what it's all about.

    (But then I turned myself around.)

    Tongue Out

  • 7 days ago · Quote · #1238

    cabadenwurt

    varelse1 wrote:

    I used to think the Hokey-Pokey was what it's all about.

    (But then I turned myself around.)

    --- Thanks for the post Varelse 1.

     

  • 6 days ago · Quote · #1239

    cabadenwurt

    Effective today it's been 50 years since the founding of " The Greatful Dead ". Of course they lost Gerry Garcia a few years back but the remaining members of the group are doing a few farewell concerts and then moving off into retirement ( their recorded music will stay with us of course ). 


Back to Top

Post your reply: