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  • 2 years ago · Quote · #61

    os808

    corrijean wrote:

     


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #62

    Da-Novelty

    CoolSealed...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #63

    Rubidium

    Smile

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #64

    Rubidium

    Ha! I have more time to waste then all of you combined!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #65

    Rubidium

    a

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #66

    Rubidium

    b

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #67

    Rubidium

    c

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #68

    Rubidium

    d

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #69

    Rubidium

    e

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #70

    Rubidium

    f

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #71

    Rubidium

    g

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #72

    corrijean

    Can't you at least post something funny? I think most of us already know the alphabet. This is from the theme of funny graffiti:

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #73

    Rubidium

    The alphabet is great to review. I see we've gotten side tracked. Let me start over again...

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #74

    Rubidium

    A a, A is the first letter of our alphabet. It was the first letter in all the alphabets from which ours evolved. The Semites, who lived in Syria and Palestine, named their first letter aleph, meaning ox. They adapted an Egyptian hieroglyphic for an ox. The ancient Greeks later used this symbol, and called it alpha. Our word alphabet, comes from alpha and beta, the second letter in Greek. The romans gave the letter it's present form.

    The letter A currently represents six different vowel sounds. In English, "a" by itself frequently denotes the near-open front unrounded vowel (/æ/) as in pad; the open back unrounded vowel (/ɑː/) as in father, its original, Latin and Greek, sound; a closer, further fronted sound as in "hare", which developed as the sound progressed from "father" to "ace"; in concert with a later orthographic vowel, the diphthong /eɪ/ as in ace and major, due to effects of the great vowel shift; the more rounded form in "water" or its closely related cousin, found in "was".

    In most other languages that use the Latin alphabet, "a" denotes an open front unrounded vowel (/a/). In the International Phonetic Alphabet, variants of "a" denote various vowels. In X-SAMPA, capital "A" denotes the open back unrounded vowel and lowercase "a" denotes the open front unrounded vowel.

    "A" is the third most commonly used letter in English, and the second most common in Spanish and French. In one study, on average, about 3.68% of letters used in English tend to be a, while the number is 6.22% in Spanish and 3.95% in French.

    "A" is often used to denote something or someone of a better or more prestigious quality or status: A-, A or A+, the best grade that can be assigned by teachers for students' schoolwork; A grade for clean restaurants; A-List celebrities, etc. Such associations can have a motivating effect as exposure to the letter A has been found to improve performance, when compared with other letters.

     

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #75

    Rubidium

    I love wikipedia Smile

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #76

    Rubidium

    aa
  • 2 years ago · Quote · #77

    Rubidium

    Or, If the alpabet seems too basic for you, let's have some pi!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #78

    Rubidium

    3.1

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #79

    Rubidium

    41

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #80

    Rubidium

    59


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