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change a move in online chess games


  • 2 years ago · Quote · #1

    dimitros

    I wish i had the chance,even for just a minute, to change my move in any online chess game.

    Most of my blunders come from moves i make and after two seconds i see that is a blunder.

    So,i think it would be better if we had the chance to reconsider our moves just for some minutes.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #2

    jimmykortsnoi

    And what about conditional moves? I had once programmed one, realized it was a mistake, tried to erase it, only to find my opponent had already reacted to it and made another move.
    That's just silly.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #3

    Callous

    Instead of implementing something like that (spending money and resources), you could do it simply by looking at the board for that 2 seconds before clicking Submit.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #4

    Martin0

    I think the "submit"-button should be enough. After a move is made there should be no return unless you play unrated drawback game.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #5

    Callous

    This matter is exactly why the Submit button exists. You shouldn't need another safety net.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #6

    Kens_Mom

    Like what others have said already, the best solution is to develop a habit of checking your move before submitting. Back when I used to play correspondence chess more often, after deciding on a move, I would always leave the game as is for a day.  Afterwards, I would look at the game again to see if I would change my mind before submitting.  This is a fairly practical method, even with 3 day per move games.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #7

    stephen_33

    The whole point of having so much time in which to make a move is that you can take the greatest care over each one. After all, the minimum time setting in online is one move per day (?) & most of the games I play are three day ones.

     I think your problem is that you are not analysing your positions with enough care - don't you set them up on a board or use a PGN editor ?
    I'd be lost without Game Editor on this site - I paste in the FEN string from the game I'm looking at & then try different moves until I find the best one (or least bad !). I now do all my game analysis this way.

    If you follow this kind of method then you'll soon stop wanting to take moves back. Also, you have a decent enough rating & if you want to improve it, then you need to cut out those blunders !

    Another thing, have you considered playing fewer simultaneous games because I see that you have 113 open games at present ?  I'm not surprised it's having an effect on the standard of your play - choose quality over quantity every time.

    Good luck with your games    Smile

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #8

    Scottrf

    I agree with stephen, it's not a surprise with over 100 games open.

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #9

    dimitros

    Thanks a lot for your advices everyone!!You are very helpful!Laughing

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #10

    BorgQueen

    LOL!   Maybe you should take the time to think about your move BEFORE you play it instead of wanting to change your mind AFTER you've played your move too hastily!  That's what chess is about.  Touch-move - you moved it and pressed your clock (submit), so you should be, by all rights, stuck with the move you made!

  • 2 years ago · Quote · #11

    artfizz

    dimitros wrote:

    I wish i had the chance,even for just a minute, to change my move in any online chess game.

    Most of my blunders come from moves i make and after two seconds i see that is a blunder.

    So,i think it would be better if we had the chance to reconsider our moves just for some minutes.

    You would definitely benefit from my OHNO! {patent pending} key.

    It works like this: a small (ohnosecond) delay is imposed on the SEND/ENTER key. This is the amount of time you have to realise your mistake, and press the OHNO! key (typically mapped onto one of the function keys). This cancels the SEND action.

    Studies show that most significant mistakes are realised within a very short time of making them (e.g. sending a stupid email to your boss; deleting a file; telling your girlfriend that she looks as if she's gained some weight). The OHNO! {patent pending} key could get you out of jail free in two out of three of these situations.


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