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New Time Controls


  • 19 months ago · Quote · #2

    rooperi

    What do you mean by hourglass style?

    The 1st 2 have an issue:

    Both players would have to be online at approximately the same time to guarantee the ability to make more than one move per day,

    Eg. Opponents in South Africa and Japan, each spending 8pm to midnight (their local time) here, would never be able to make more than one move per day.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #3

    TheGrobe

    I think it was in his Blog which is no longer accessible.

    Note that all moves in Y days is a specific case of X moves in Y days (as X approaches infinity).

    I've always like options like the ones above that give much more certainty to the total duration of a game.  I've had tournaments here run multiple years (much to my surprise) which is why I'd never enter a no-vacation tournament.  If the duration of each round were more certain I might change this view.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #5

    rooperi

    ozzie_c_cobblepot wrote:

    @rooperi

    Hourglass style is where you both start out with (for example) 10 days, then if you take 1 day, your clock is at 9 days and your opponent's is at 11. Then they take 3 days, and they are at 8 and you are at 12.

    You're right about that specific example. But that user could then enter a 10 moves in 12 days tournament, where they might previously never have considered entering a 1 move in 1 day tournament.

    Ah, ok. I assumed (illogically, it seems) the idea was to get in multiple moves per day.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #7

    trysts

    ozzie_c_cobblepot wrote:

     

    Note that I have no idea if hourglass chess would make any sense at all, it's more of a novelty, so that anybody else can start posting their own ideas.

    I'm so glad you posted a novelty to allow for dog-time-controls. Let me explain...

    Dogs live seven years on the planet and they're almost fifty years old. Dogs can't remember if you gave them a treat ten minutes ago. Playing chess under dog-time-rules(DTR) presents various problems which may lead to the omission of human beings participating in near-future chess tournaments.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #8

    rooperi

    trysts wrote:
    ozzie_c_cobblepot wrote:

     

    Note that I have no idea if hourglass chess would make any sense at all, it's more of a novelty, so that anybody else can start posting their own ideas.

    I'm so glad you posted a novelty to allow for dog-time-controls. Let me explain...

    Dogs live seven years on the planet and they're almost fifty years old. Dogs can't remember if you gave them a treat ten minutes ago. Playing chess under dog-time-rules(DTR) presents various problems which may lead to the omission of human beings participating in near-future chess tournaments.

    I'm confused, is that near-future in dog years, or human years?

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #9

    whirlwind2011

    TheGrobe wrote:

    ...

    I've always like options like the ones above that give much more certainty to the total duration of a game.  I've had tournaments here run multiple years (much to my surprise) which is why I'd never enter a no-vacation tournament.  If the duration of each round were more certain I might change this view.

    I'm confused by this. Most people enter no-vacation tournaments because they usually progress much faster than vacation-permitted tournaments.

  • 19 months ago · Quote · #10

    Shakaali

    I think the first option is at the very least superior to what we currently have.

    My reasons are maybe somewhat different than those stated by others  above. I think having a fixed time available for every move is against the very  nature of the game of chess as some moves (maybe most of the moves?) are rather obvious so you'd like to play them fast and use the saved time on the critical moments. Under the current time controls you don't gain any benefit from playing obvious moves fast.

    The possible reduction for the need to take vacation is an added bonus.

  • 9 months ago · Quote · #12

    MSC157

    That would be interesting.

    Or maybe, starting with 5 days and with 6h of Fischer time per move.


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