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Helping match teammates?


  • 6 years ago · Quote · #2

    Mygame5377

    If this is before the game then yes but in the middle then know.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #3

    zlhflans

    good question. that was what I hoped the answers would be. Not during the game.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #4

    Upabushtrack

    I see nothing wrong with being fully prepared before you start any game. Should do it myself sometime.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #5

    Billium248

    My understanding is that these Team Match games operate under the same rules as normal turn-based games on Chess.com:

    What are the rules for playing?
    You many only have ONE Chess.com member account. You may NOT get any help from any person or any chess engine that analyzes your specific position, including tablebases. You MAY use books, magazines, or other articles. You may also use computer databases.

    I believe that a Team Mate falls under the category, "any person."

    The idea of preparing for certain individuals before the match starts fails to take into account the other players who have yet to join and will alter who plays who.  The only way for this to be effective would be to research every player within a few spaces from you on either side, cuz it could change right up until that final bell.  But still a good idea.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #6

    donngerard

    yah by posting a comment :)

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #7

    photray94

    I agree with Lizard.  If you were to help out a teammate in a match between groups during a game it would become but an onslaught of vote chess games.  Before and after, of course it's fine to help out your teammates - in fact, I think they'd appreciate it.Wink

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #8

    vijaykulkarni

    The fun of individuals playing individuals will be lost.. Yes advise and best wishes before and after game are ok.. Must encourage participation by good words to all.. Just because this is online chess, it is still not easy to track if somebody is cheating or not.. in the long term it will not help the cheaters in anyway as they will not know the purpose of certain moves suggested or played by better players ..

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #9

    zlhflans

    Well put.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #13

    rich

    I wouldn't of thought it would be acceptable too help anyone before a tournament.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #15

    Baseballfan

    Before the game, you may do all the preperation, talking, planning, strategizing, theorizing, etc. that you want, with anyone you want. Once the game starts, NO outside help from teammates, coaches, other players, or any other person is allowed.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #18

    charlierock

    Billium248 wrote:

    My understanding is that these Team Match games operate under the same rules as normal turn-based games on Chess.com:

    What are the rules for playing?
    You many only have ONE Chess.com member account. You may NOT get any help from any person or any chess engine that analyzes your specific position, including tablebases. You MAY use books, magazines, or other articles. You may also use computer databases.

    I believe that a Team Mate falls under the category, "any person."

    The idea of preparing for certain individuals before the match starts fails to take into account the other players who have yet to join and will alter who plays who.  The only way for this to be effective would be to research every player within a few spaces from you on either side, cuz it could change right up until that final bell.  But still a good idea.


    I believe that you mat be able to prepare before the match,but what  happens when they make a different move from the one that you were expecting.

  • 6 years ago · Quote · #20

    grey_pieces

    *bump* - sorry just caught this thread in tracked activity and it perked my interest. I think banning pre game help smacks of obeying the letter of the rules whilst regarding their intent. On the other hand, when does preparation become interference?

    The way I look at it is that you may not get interactive help (people, cpu's) to help decide on your moves for you. If your team strategy ("We are 7 pts clear guys, draw now if you can, we'll seal it") influences your play, then so what? That's good chess, but analysing a position in progress, and speaking to one of the players involved(!) about it may well influence their choice of move; even if you don't mean to, something you say could, by fluke, allow them to find a game-winning move - and who will believe you after the fact that you only intended to encourage, and not codedly tell them their next move?

    An interesting grey area - post-mortems of game 1 during the 2nd game of a both-ends match. A strong and eloquent player could easily hide strategical advice in a breakdown of the first game, that *directly* pertains to the second game, by undertsanding the mutual weaknesses in both of the opponents positions. I'm a sly s*d, & I think I would be capable of this, if I turned my hand to it (of course, the players in question would have to be something I was able to handle.)

    Ultimately I think the onus is on the teacher not to potentially involve themselves with a game in progress. Surely watching a teammate win on their own is more satisfying in the end anyway? By all means help your fellows, but before and after the fact... If you happen to have looked at a position *at all* then avoid conversing about it until it terminates, full stop. You probably can't go wrong there. I think this idea handles the draw rule that David & Ozzie bring up. I just think if you have looked at the game in question, make no suggestions at all, because it may be construed as interference, even if your suggestion was not influenced by the current state of the game.

    Think of it like spying on your kids. By peeking, you have to agree to remove yourself from any involvement, else you look bad and they learn the wrong lesson - you just gotta hope they make you proud. I think looking at a game in progress that's not yours means you must agree to keep your thoughts to yourself until its over...

    Someone will point out the flaw in the kids analogy above - what if you know your "kid" is in danger, and you have to intervene? You go to the authorities, of course. The only case that applies to chess is that you believe you have found a cheat, in which case report them to chess.com, not the player on your team who faces.

    So, no, I don't see an issue with suggesting someone should go for a draw mid-game... as long as the suggestion does not come from someone who has studied the position in question. Otherwise, "go for a draw" could be interpreted as "you have a bad position, but there is a drawing line". Again though, its largely difficult stop people breaching this code of conduct. Even if you mean to give non-specific advice, your subconscious bias might not be so tight-lipped. I'm gonna guess that the NM's who posted here are no stranger to the non-conscious part of their brain playing some spectatctular moves for them, and I don't see how you can expect to stop that uncontrollable, incpomprehnsible part of your brain "accidentally" doing something great it found, whether it's your board or not.

    Phew! I hope nobody actually went to the trouble of reading all that, and just skipped to this bit, like I would have!


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