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Turning a disastrous failure to a draw ...


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    trakoz

    After the improper castling moment 13. O-O,

    I was forced to gambit my bishop 19. Bh6

    thus turning the game into a draw.

     

    The game can be had here ...


    http://www.chess.com/echess/game.html?id=50491691

    http://www.chess.com/groups/team_match.html?id=105329

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    fzweb

    What would happen after 24. Kg8?

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    trakoz

                             The interesting game can be verified ...

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    trakoz

    Yea! That's another option, but the opponent loses his queen

    at the cost of my Rook and Knight.

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    trakoz

    You will like it ...!
     
  • 6 months ago · Quote · #6

    trakoz

    A good game ...

     

    The game can be had here ...

    http://www.chess.com/echess/game?id=82974996

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #7

    scandium

    I had a similar experience recently, where a mistake in the early middlegame developed into a very dangerous looking attack for white. To neutralize it, I sacrificed a pawn to trade Qs off, hoping to maneouver the game into something where I had drawing chances.

     

    After I dropped a pawn (turning the game into a 2 pawn deficit), my opponent began to oblige me in my quest to draw the seemingly lost game: he allowed a pawn trade that let me activate my inactive bad bishop (and turned it into a good B); in the opposite colored B endgame that we reached, he then allowed a trade of the rook pairs that were remaining.

     

    My endgame play was far from perfect, but I reached the drawing position that I hoped for: opposite colored Bs with mine, with support from the K, holding up his 2 passers on the Qside so that he could not penetrate the position to queen either pawn. A rep draw followed.

     

    I'm a big believer in playing on with a modest material deficit for as long as I can see some possibility of either reaching a theoretical draw, or complications where I may find either a perp check or simply come out better off than the early position looked.

  • 6 months ago · Quote · #8

    trakoz

    scandium wrote:

    I had a similar experience recently, where a mistake in the early middlegame developed into a very dangerous looking attack for white. To neutralize it, I sacrificed a pawn to trade Qs off, hoping to maneouver the game into something where I had drawing chances.

     

    After I dropped a pawn (turning the game into a 2 pawn deficit), my opponent began to oblige me in my quest to draw the seemingly lost game: he allowed a pawn trade that let me activate my inactive bad bishop (and turned it into a good B); in the opposite colored B endgame that we reached, he then allowed a trade of the rook pairs that were remaining.

     

    My endgame play was far from perfect, but I reached the drawing position that I hoped for: opposite colored Bs with mine, with support from the K, holding up his 2 passers on the Qside so that he could not penetrate the position to queen either pawn. A rep draw followed.

     

    I'm a big believer in playing on with a modest material deficit for as long as I can see some possibility of either reaching a theoretical draw, or complications where I may find either a perp check or simply come out better off than the early position looked.

    Please share your game here ...!

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #9

    trakoz

    Have patience, the game can be a draw ...

    http://www.chess.com/livechess/game?id=884322839

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #10

    matthew_b_rook

    trakoz wrote:

                             The interesting game can be verified ...

     

     

    after 21.Rxf8 Kxh6 wins

  • 4 months ago · Quote · #11

    trakoz

    matthew_b_rook wrote:
    trakoz wrote: 

    after 21.Rxf8 Kxh6 wins

    True but the opponent missed it.


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