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"Michael The Arch Angel"


  • 3 years ago · Quote · #1

    bulletheadbilly

                                

     

                       

     

    Michael (archangel)

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Archangel Michael

    A 13th-century Byzantine icon from Saint Catherine's Monastery, Mount Sinai
    Archangel
    Honored in AnglicanismCatholicismEastern OrthodoxyOriental Orthodoxy,LutheranismIslamJudaism
    Canonized pre-congregation
    Feast November 8 (New Calendar Eastern Orthodox Churches) / November 21 (Old Calendar Eastern Orthodox Churches), September 29 ("Michaelmas"); May 8; many other local and historical feasts
    Attributes Archangel; Treading on Satan or a serpent; carrying a banner, scales, and sword
    Patronage Guardian of the Catholic Church;[1] protector of the Jewish people.[2], police officers[3], military, grocers, mariners, paratroopers[4]

    Michael (Hebrewמִיכָאֵל‎ (pronounced [ˌmixäˈʔel]), Micha'el or Mîkhā'ēlGreekΜιχαήλMikhaḗl;LatinMichael or MíchaëlArabicميخائيل‎, Mīkhā'īl) is an archangel in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic teachings. Roman CatholicsAnglicans, and Lutherans refer to him as Saint Michael the Archangel and also simply as Saint MichaelOrthodox Christians refer to him as theTaxiarch Archangel Michael or simply Archangel Michael.

    In Hebrew, Michael means "who is like God" (mi-who, ke-as or like, El-deity), which is traditionally interpreted as a rhetorical question: "Who is like God?" (which expects an answer in the negative) to imply that no one is like God. In this way, Michael is reinterpreted as a symbol of humility before God.[5]

    In the Hebrew Bible Michael is mentioned three times in the Book of Daniel, once as a "great prince who stands up for the children of your people". The idea that Michael was the advocate of the Jews became so prevalent that in spite of the rabbinical prohibition against appealing to angels as intermediaries between God and his people, Michael came to occupy a certain place in the Jewish liturgy.

    In the New Testament Michael leads God's armies against Satan's forces in the Book of Revelation, where during the war in heaven he defeats Satan. In the Epistle of Jude Michael is specifically referred to as an "archangel". Christian sanctuaries to Michael appeared in the 4th century, when he was first seen as a healing angel, and then over time as a protector and the leader of the army of God against the forces of evil. By the 6th century devotions to Archangel Michael were widespread both in the Eastern and Western Churches. Over time, teachings on Michael began to vary among Christian denominations.

    Contents

      [show

    [edit]Scriptural references

    [edit]Hebrew Bible

    Guido Reni's Michael (in Santa Maria della Concezione church, Rome, 1636) tramples Satan. A mosaic of the same painting decorates St. Michael's Altar inSt. Peter's Basilica.

    In the Hebrew Bible, and hence in the Old Testament, the prophet Daniel experiences a vision after having undergone a period of fasting. In the vision in Daniel 10:13-21 an angel identifies Michael as the protector of Israel. Daniel refers to Michael as a "prince of the first rank".[6] Later in the vision in Daniel 12:1 Daniel is informed about the role of Michael during the "time of the End" when there will be "distress such as has not happened from the beginning of nations" and that:[7]

    “At that time Michael, the great prince who protects your people, will arise."

    Thus although the three references to Michael in the Book of Daniel 10:13, 10:21 and 12:1 are to the same individual who acts in similar ways in all three cases, the last one is set at the "end times" while the first two refer to local time in Persia.[8] These are the only three references to Archangel Michael in the Hebrew Bible.[9]

    The references to the "captain of the host of the Lord" encountered by Joshua in the early days of his campaigns in the Promised Land (Joshua 5:13-15) have at times been interpreted as Michael the Archangel, but there is no theological basis for that assumption, given that Joshua then worshiped this figure, and angels are not to be worshiped, and the figure may refer to Yahweh himself.[10][11]

    [edit]New Testament

    The Book of Revelation (12:7-9) describes a war in heaven in which Michael, being stronger, defeats Satan: [12]

    "...there was war in heaven. Michael and his angels fought against the dragon, and the dragon and his angels fought back. But he was not strong enough, and they lost their place in heaven."

    After the conflict, Satan is thrown to earth along with the fallen angels, where he ("that ancient serpent called the devil") still tries to "leads the whole world astray".[12]

    Separately, in the Epistle of Jude 1:9 Michael is specifically referred to as an "archangel" when he again confronts Satan:[13]

    "Michael the archangel, when contending with the devil he disputed about the body of Moses"

    A reference to an "archangel" also appears in the First Epistle to the Thessalonians (4:16)

    "... the Lord himself shall descend from heaven, with a shout, with the voice of the archangel, and with the trump of God: and the dead in Christ shall rise first;"

    but the archangel who heralds the second coming of Christ is not named.[13]

    [edit]Qur'an

    Michael (Arabic: ميخائيل, Mikhail ميكائيل, Mikael ), is one of the two archangels mentioned in the Qur'an, alongside Jibreel (Gabriel). In the Qur'an, Michael is mentioned once only, in Sura 2:98: "Whoever is an enemy to God, and His angels and His messengers, and Jibreel and Mikhail! Then, lo! God (Himself) is an enemy to the disbelievers."[14] Some Muslims believe that the reference in Sura 11:69 is Michael, one of the three angels who visited Abraham.[14]

    [edit]Religious traditions

    [edit]Judaism

    According to rabbinic Jewish tradition, Michael acted as the advocate of Israel, and sometimes had to fight with the princes of the other nations (cf. Daniel 10:13) and particularly with the angel Samael, Israel's accuser. Michael's enmity with Samael dates from the time when the latter was thrown down from heaven. Samael took hold of the wings of Michael, whom he wished to bring down with him in his fall; but Michael was saved by God.[15][16] Michael is also said to have had a dispute with Samael over the soul of Moses.[17]

    Michael in Hebrew

    The idea that Michael was the advocate of the Jews became so prevalent that in spite of the rabbinical prohibition against appealing to angels as intermediaries between God and his people, Michael came to occupy a certain place in the Jewish liturgy. There were two prayers written beseeching him as the prince of mercy to intercede in favor of Israel: one composed by Eliezer ha-Kalir, and the other by Judah b. Samuel he-Hasid. But appeal to Michael seems to have been more common in ancient times. Thus Jeremiah is said to have addressed a prayer to him.[18] "When a man is in need he must pray directly to God, and neither to Michael nor to Gabriel."[19]

    The rabbis declare that Michael entered upon his role of defender at the time of the biblical patriarchs. Thus, according to Rabbi Eliezer ben Jacob, it was Michael who rescued Abraham from the furnace into which he had been thrown by Nimrod (Midrash Genesis Rabbah xliv. 16). It was Michael, the "one that had escaped" (Genesis 14:13), who told Abraham that Lot had been taken captive (Midrash Pirke R. El.), and who protected Sarah from being defiled by Abimelech. He announced to Sarah that she would bear a son and he rescued Lot at the destruction of Sodom.[20]

    [edit]Midrash

    It is said that Michael prevented Isaac from being sacrificed by his father by substituting a ram in his place, and saved Jacob, while yet in his mother's womb, from being killed by Samael.[21] Later Michael prevented Laban from harming Jacob (Pirke R. El. xxxvi.). According to one source, it was Michael who wrestled with Jacob and who afterward blessed him.[22]

    The midrash Exodus Rabbah holds that Michael exercised his function of advocate of Israel at the time of the Exodus also, when Satan (as an adversary) accused the Israelites of idolatry and declared that they were consequently deserving of death by drowning in the Red Sea. Michael is also said to have destroyed the army of Sennacherib.[23]

    [edit]Christianity

    [edit]Early Christian views and devotions

    Statue of Archangel Michael at theUniversity of Bonn, slaying Satan as a dragon. Quis ut Deus is inscribed on his shield.

    The early Christians regarded some of the martyrs such as Saint George, and Saint Theodore, as military patrons ; but to St Michael they gave the care of their sick and he was first venerated as a healer in Phrygia (modern-day Turkey).[24]

    The earliest and most famous sanctuary to Saint Michael in the ancient near east was also associated with healing waters. It was the Michaelion built in early 4th century by Emperor Constantine at Chalcedon, on the site of an earlier Temple called Sosthenion.[9]

    A painting of the Archangel slaying a serpent became a major art piece at the Michaelion after Constantine defeated Licinius near there in 324, eventually leading to the standard iconography of Archangel Michael as a warrior saint slaying a dragon.[9] The Michaelion was a magnificent church and in time became a model for hundreds of other churches in Eastern Christianity which spread devotions to the Archangel.[25]

    In the 4th century, Saint Basil the Great's homily (De Angelis) placed Saint Michael over all the angels. He was called "Archangel" because he is the prince of the other angels.[24] Into the 6th century, the view of Michael as a healer continued in Rome, when after a plague the sick slept at night in the church of Castel Sant'Angelo (dedicated to him for saving Rome), waiting for his manifestation.[24][26]

    In the 6th century the growth of devotions to the saint in the Western Church were manifested by the feasts dedicated to him, as recorded in the Leonine Sacramentary. The 7th century Gelasian Sacramentary included the feast "S. Michaelis Archangeli", as did the 8th century Gregorian Sacramentary.[24] Some of these documents refer to a no longer extant Basilica Archangeli on via Salaria in Rome.[24]

    The angelology of Pseudo-Dionysius which was widely read as of the 6th century gave Michael a rank in the celestial hierarchy.[24] Later, in the 13th century, others such as Bonaventure believed that he is the prince of the Seraphim, the first of the nine angelic orders. According to Saint Thomas Aquinas (Summa Ia. 113.3), he is the Prince of the last and lowest choir, the angels.[24]

    [edit]Catholicism

    Archangel Michael reaching to save souls near death, by Jacopo Vignali, 17th century

    Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christians often refer to Michael as "Saint Michael", an honorific title that does not indicate canonisation. He is generally referred to in Christian litanies as"Saint Michael the Archangel." Orthodoxy accords him the title "Archistrategos", or "Supreme Commander of the Heavenly Hosts."

    In the Roman Catholic teachings Saint Michael has four main roles or offices.[27] His first role is the leader of the Army of God and the leader of heaven's forces in their triumph over the powers of hell.[28]He is viewed as the angelic model for the virtues of the spiritual warrior, with the conflict against evil at times viewed as the battle within.[29]

    The second and third roles of Michael in Catholic teachings deal with death. In his second role, Michael is the angel of death, carrying the souls of all the deceased to heaven. In this role, at the hour of death, Michael descends and gives each soul the chance to redeem itself before passing, thus consternating the devil and his minions. Catholic prayers often refer to this role of Michael. In his third role, he weighs souls in his perfectly balanced scales (hence Michael is often depicted holding scales).[30]

    In his fourth role, St Michael, the special patron of the Chosen People in the Old Testament, is also the guardian of the Church; it was thus not unusual for the angel to be revered by the military orders of knights during the Middle Ages. This role also extends to his being the patron saint of a number of cities and countries.[31][32]

    Roman Catholicism includes traditions such as the Prayer to Saint Michael which specifically asks for the faithful to be "defended" by the saint.[33][34][35] The Chaplet of Saint Michael consists of nine salutations, one for each choir of angels.[36][37]

    It should be noted that the Roman Catholic traditions and teachings concerning St. Michael the Archangel are not required beliefs and practices but rather are strongly encouraged as a means of individuals and congregations increasing in spiritual srength against evil.

    [edit]Early Protestant views

    Some early Protestant scholars identified Michael with the pre-incarnate Christ, basing their view, partly on the juxtaposition of the "child" and the archangel in Revelation 12, and partly on the attributes ascribed to him in Daniel.[38]

    [edit]Jehovah's Witnesses

    Jehovah's Witnesses believe that there is only one "archangel" in heaven and in the Bible. They teach that the pre-human and post-resurrection Jesus and the Archangel Michael are the same person, saying: "the evidence indicates that the Son of God was known as Michael before he came to earth and is known also by that name since his return to heaven where he resides as the glorified spirit Son of God." They point out that the actual term "Archangel" in the Bible is only used in the singular, never clearly in the plural. They also say that Michael is the same "Angel of the Lord" who led the Israelites in the wilderness.[39] 3 years ago · Quote · #2

    bulletheadbilly

     

     

     

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #3

    suezy

    very nice

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #4

    bulletheadbilly

    Thanks suezy

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #5

    suezy

    one of these photos could be our avatar . I quite like the cupid the second last oneSmile

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #6

    bulletheadbilly

    i dont think its cupid..

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #7

    suezy

    well the archangel

  • 3 years ago · Quote · #8

    bulletheadbilly

    The Catholics have alot of different pics of Michael standing over Lucifer..


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