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Anand Back to 3rd in April FIDE Rating List

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 4/2/14, 12:06 AM.

Thanks to his splendid performance in Khanty-Mansiysk, Viswanathan Anand moved back up to third place in the world rankings. On the April FIDE ratings list, the ex-World Champion won 15 point to reach a rating of 2785, two points more than Vladimir Kramnik. Magnus Carlsen (2881) and Levon Aronian (2812) remain number one and two.

For the world's number one and world champ, Magnus Carlsen, nothing has changed. He did play one game (his win over Vladimir Georgiev for the Norwegian league), but apparently that result didn't reach Elista in time. Levon Aronian's minus score in Khanty-Mansiysk meant a loss of 18 points while Vladimir Kramnik lost 4.

Winning 15 points at the Candidates’, Vishy Anand leapfrogged from 8th to 3rd place. He isn't playing in the next super tournaments, the Gashimov Memorial in April and the Norway Chess tournament in June, but there is still one spot left in the latter. Who wouldn't want to see him playing there?

Sergey Karjakin won 6 rating points and moved up from number 9 to number 7. This month it's more clear than ever how close these players are: Karjakin has exactly the same rating as Veselin Topalov (who lost 13 points and went from 4 to 8) and Hikaru Nakamura (who didn't play). Shakhriyar Mamedyarov, who won just 3 points, jumped from 13 to 10. 

A bit lower in the list we can see that playing a lot can be good for your chess. David Navara (22 games) and Li Chao (21 games) moved up from #50 and #49 to #39 and #34 respectively.

Judit Polgar dropped 8 points at the European Championship but is still 67 points ahead of Hou Yifan, who lost 11 points.

Below you can see the overall top 100 of active players, and the top 50 of active female players.

April 2014 FIDE Ratings (Top 100)

Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Carlsen, Magnus g NOR 2881 0 1990
2 Aronian, Levon g ARM 2812 14 1982
3 Anand, Viswanathan g IND 2785 14 1969
4 Kramnik, Vladimir g RUS 2783 14 1975
5 Caruana, Fabiano g ITA 2783 0 1992
6 Grischuk, Alexander g RUS 2777 0 1983
7 Karjakin, Sergey g RUS 2772 14 1990
8 Topalov, Veselin g BUL 2772 14 1975
9 Nakamura, Hikaru g USA 2772 0 1987
10 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar g AZE 2760 14 1985
11 Vachier-Lagrave, Maxime g FRA 2758 0 1990
12 Dominguez Perez, Leinier g CUB 2757 0 1983
13 Svidler, Peter g RUS 2756 14 1976
14 Adams, Michael g ENG 2753 2 1971
15 Gelfand, Boris g ISR 2753 0 1968
16 Ivanchuk, Vassily g UKR 2753 0 1969
17 Vitiugov, Nikita g RUS 2747 0 1987
18 Giri, Anish g NED 2745 0 1994
19 So, Wesley g PHI 2738 0 1993
20 Wang, Hao g CHN 2734 0 1989
21 Eljanov, Pavel g UKR 2732 11 1983
22 Nepomniachtchi, Ian g RUS 2732 0 1990
23 Leko, Peter g HUN 2730 0 1979
24 Jakovenko, Dmitry g RUS 2726 11 1983
25 Harikrishna, P. g IND 2726 4 1986
26 Ponomariov, Ruslan g UKR 2723 2 1983
27 Andreikin, Dmitry g RUS 2722 14 1990
28 Bacrot, Etienne g FRA 2722 13 1983
29 Morozevich, Alexander g RUS 2722 0 1977
30 Wang, Yue g CHN 2717 0 1987
31 Wojtaszek, Radoslaw g POL 2716 14 1987
32 Kamsky, Gata g USA 2714 9 1974
33 Radjabov, Teimour g AZE 2713 0 1987
34 Li, Chao g CHN 2711 21 1989
35 Fressinet, Laurent g FRA 2711 13 1981
36 Ding, Liren g CHN 2710 20 1992
37 Le, Quang Liem g VIE 2710 9 1991
38 Moiseenko, Alexander g UKR 2707 11 1980
39 Navara, David g CZE 2706 22 1985
40 Naiditsch, Arkadij g GER 2706 12 1985
41 Jobava, Baadur g GEO 2706 11 1983
42 Rublevsky, Sergei g RUS 2706 0 1974
43 Kryvoruchko, Yuriy g UKR 2704 17 1986
44 Shirov, Alexei g LAT 2702 12 1972
45 Areshchenko, Alexander g UKR 2701 13 1986
46 Malakhov, Vladimir g RUS 2701 11 1980
47 Bu, Xiangzhi g CHN 2699 0 1985
48 Rapport, Richard g HUN 2698 17 1996
49 Korobov, Anton g UKR 2698 16 1985
50 Tomashevsky, Evgeny g RUS 2697 11 1987
51 Almasi, Zoltan g HUN 2693 11 1976
52 Vallejo Pons, Francisco g ESP 2693 2 1982
53 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam g UZB 2693 0 1979
54 Inarkiev, Ernesto g RUS 2691 11 1985
55 Matlakov, Maxim g RUS 2690 13 1991
56 Riazantsev, Alexander g RUS 2688 11 1985
57 Cheparinov, Ivan g BUL 2686 11 1986
58 Nisipeanu, Liviu-Dieter g ROU 2686 2 1976
59 Motylev, Alexander g RUS 2685 11 1979
60 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2685 11 1976
61 Granda Zuniga, Julio E g PER 2685 6 1967
62 Van Wely, Loek g NED 2685 3 1972
63 Sargissian, Gabriel g ARM 2684 11 1983
64 Khismatullin, Denis g RUS 2681 11 1984
65 Berkes, Ferenc g HUN 2680 11 1985
66 Sasikiran, Krishnan g IND 2680 2 1981
67 Onischuk, Alexander g USA 2679 0 1975
68 Alekseev, Evgeny g RUS 2678 11 1985
69 Rodshtein, Maxim g ISR 2678 9 1989
70 Bruzon Batista, Lazaro g CUB 2678 0 1982
71 Zhigalko, Sergei g BLR 2675 11 1989
72 Akopian, Vladimir g ARM 2674 11 1971
73 McShane, Luke J g ENG 2674 2 1984
74 Laznicka, Viktor g CZE 2673 21 1988
75 Dreev, Aleksey g RUS 2670 11 1969
76 Movsesian, Sergei g ARM 2670 7 1978
77 Edouard, Romain g FRA 2670 0 1990
78 Yu, Yangyi g CHN 2667 11 1994
79 Istratescu, Andrei g FRA 2667 10 1975
80 Saric, Ivan g CRO 2665 13 1990
81 Fedoseev, Vladimir g RUS 2663 11 1995
82 Lysyj, Igor g RUS 2662 11 1987
83 Short, Nigel D g ENG 2661 10 1965
84 Lupulescu, Constantin g ROU 2660 11 1984
85 Mamedov, Rauf g AZE 2660 0 1988
86 Bartel, Mateusz g POL 2659 16 1985
87 Grachev, Boris g RUS 2659 11 1986
88 Efimenko, Zahar g UKR 2657 0 1985
89 Balogh, Csaba g HUN 2656 13 1987
90 Smirin, Ilia g ISR 2656 11 1968
91 Safarli, Eltaj g AZE 2656 0 1992
92 Najer, Evgeniy g RUS 2655 20 1977
93 Lenic, Luka g SLO 2655 4 1988
94 Gharamian, Tigran g FRA 2655 0 1984
95 Ni, Hua g CHN 2654 9 1983
96 Howell, David W L g ENG 2654 4 1990
97 Nielsen, Peter Heine g DEN 2654 1 1973
98 Sjugirov, Sanan g RUS 2653 11 1993
99 Popov, Ivan g RUS 2651 11 1990
100 Erdos, Viktor g HUN 2651 3 1987
101 Tiviakov, Sergei g NED 2651 3 1973

April 2014 FIDE Ratings (Top 50, Women)

Rank Name Title Country Rating Games B-Year
1 Polgar, Judit g HUN 2685 11 1976
2 Hou, Yifan g CHN 2618 11 1994
3 Koneru, Humpy g IND 2613 0 1987
4 Muzychuk, Anna g SLO 2560 0 1990
5 Zhao, Xue g CHN 2552 0 1985
6 Dzagnidze, Nana g GEO 2550 11 1987
7 Lagno, Kateryna g UKR 2543 0 1989
8 Ju, Wenjun wg CHN 2527 11 1991
9 Kosteniuk, Alexandra g RUS 2527 0 1984
10 Muzychuk, Mariya m UKR 2524 0 1992
11 Khotenashvili, Bela g GEO 2513 11 1988
12 Kosintseva, Nadezhda g RUS 2513 0 1985
13 Cmilyte, Viktorija g LTU 2511 2 1983
14 Gunina, Valentina g RUS 2508 2 1989
15 Hoang, Thanh Trang g HUN 2508 1 1980
16 Harika, Dronavalli g IND 2507 10 1991
17 Cramling, Pia g SWE 2507 3 1963
18 Ruan, Lufei wg CHN 2503 0 1987
19 Ushenina, Anna g UKR 2501 0 1985
20 Pogonina, Natalija wg RUS 2499 0 1985
21 Kosintseva, Tatiana g RUS 2496 0 1986
22 Krush, Irina g USA 2491 9 1983
23 Sebag, Marie g FRA 2490 0 1986
24 Stefanova, Antoaneta g BUL 2489 13 1979
25 Tan, Zhongyi wg CHN 2488 11 1991
26 Huang, Qian wg CHN 2484 0 1986
27 Javakhishvili, Lela m GEO 2475 11 1984
28 Zatonskih, Anna m USA 2475 3 1978
29 Moser, Eva m AUT 2463 6 1982
30 Zhu, Chen g QAT 2461 0 1976
31 Danielian, Elina g ARM 2460 11 1978
32 Khurtsidze, Nino m GEO 2460 11 1975
33 Melia, Salome m GEO 2459 13 1987
34 Zhukova, Natalia g UKR 2459 0 1979
35 Bodnaruk, Anastasia m RUS 2453 2 1992
36 Guo, Qi wg CHN 2452 11 1995
37 Socko, Monika g POL 2450 2 1978
38 Girya, Olga wg RUS 2450 0 1991
39 Mkrtchian, Lilit m ARM 2449 11 1982
40 Shen, Yang m CHN 2449 11 1989
41 Lei, Tingjie CHN 2442 20 1997
42 Atalik, Ekaterina m TUR 2442 0 1982
43 Skripchenko, Almira m FRA 2442 0 1976
44 Paehtz, Elisabeth m GER 2440 11 1985
45 Ding, Yixin wg CHN 2439 11 1991
46 Hunt, Harriet V m ENG 2438 0 1978
47 Peptan, Corina-Isabela m ROU 2438 0 1978
48 Munguntuul, Batkhuyag m MGL 2432 0 1987
49 Tania, Sachdev m IND 2427 10 1986
50 Bojkovic, Natasa m SRB 2425 9 1971

All data courtesy of FIDE

8322 reads 19 comments
7 votes

Comments


  • 7 months ago

    G-Jax

    this next WCC is going to be boring...

  • 7 months ago

    cheese714

    GREAT NEWS, WOW!!!

  • 7 months ago

    Marcokim

    @b2b2, I am not sure you can admire Kasparov, Fischer and Tal at the same time.

    Fischer despised Tal's style even though he lost to him a few times Fischer thought very little of Tal as a player.

    "Tal is like a crazy Fisherman who casts his wild net into the lake hoping to catch a confused fish" (Bobby Fischer)...

    Fischer knew that the Latvian relied more on tactical chaos (in open complex positions) than sound chess and soon Spassky and Petrosian punished him severely by closing up their games and playing strategically. Tal did try and balance his style later on but his health was failing already.

    I believe Fischer would worship Magnus style more than anyones because he wished to play like that and admired Capablanca greatly. Kasparov called Magnus the modern Capablanca.

    Kasparov style was balanced by the great Karpov and Kaspy says that their first WCC match was the greatest chess lesson in his life. He begun to appreciate strategic play a bit more and balanced his style. Many believe that Karpov at his peak was Kasparov's equal not his inferior.

    I guess the question is... can someone play like Kasparov in this day and age and beat a solid 2700+ GM. Maybe Magnus style of seeking minute advantages in the middle game and then building on them with consistent solidity over 30+ moves is the only way to beat the modern 2700+ GM. The opportunities for opening preparation advantages have been reduced by the enormous amount of theoretical knowledge available.

  • 7 months ago

    b2b2

    Style is a matter of taste and although each has its merits those which attack warms me.   So I am wishing Anand the best of luck.

    Carlsen's style is sound, technical chess, akin to Capablanca and Petrosian. They eschew unfathomable tactics for safe, sound moves.  Frequently, this results in a pawn or piece advantage, which is converted to an endgame win. 

    Personally, I prefer the style of a Kasparov, or a Fischer, or a Tal.  Players who push imagination to the limit, while thrilling the audience, in pursuit of their art.

  • 7 months ago

    Marcokim

    Ratings are not perfect - how can they be - but they aren't meaningless either. Unfortunately in this universe of space-time past perfomance is really the only way to predict future performance. However when we invent time travel, I am sure the world will be more than happy to look into a crystal ball to predict future behavior.

    Until then you will probably have to go to your interview with your CV and FIDE will have to rely on "meaningless" ratings.

    Good day

  • 7 months ago

    fabelhaft

    If ratings are meaningless, who are the four strongest players in the world if it isn't Carlsen, Aronian, Anand and Kramnik?

  • 7 months ago

    ildolphino

    @VahanGoldenStar: I think they are still a pretty good indication of a player's current strength. You just overemphasize exceptions when a player's current strength is below his mean strength over a longer time period (in case of Aronian).

    You are right that they are sometimes deceptive, but not meaningless...

  • 7 months ago

    JuanchoniAlex

    I really expected of ARONIAN-CARLSEN match 'cause I think it would be great. But watching each and every rounds changed my expectations. Vishy played carefully each and every game. I was wrong when I said that Vishy just got lucky on the first round against Aronian but on 8th round, Vishy proved that he really deserves to be the contender. Goodluck Vishy. So to you my idol, Mozart!

  • 7 months ago

    VahanGoldenStar

    Ratings are very deceptive. They are merely indication of your past success. Your future success depends on your preparation. We can see this truth in performance of Levon Aronian who, despite being 60+ points ahead of his competitors, lost to Anand, Mamedyarov, and Karjakin. He even lost to Andreikin - who was more than 120 points behind him! And Aronian, the favorite of the event, ended up being the biggest loser! I hope he recovers and plays better since he's a terrific player. Also remember what happened to one of last year's high rated player - Teimur Rajabov? He was rated 2793 and now he's in low 2700s and no one knows if he will climb the ladder again. I hope he does since he's another great chess player whose play enriches the game.


    So please ignore ratings, they're virtually meaningless! Let's just hope that both Anand and Carlsen are well prepared for their match. If so, it will be a very interesting one.

  • 7 months ago

    joncasals5

    Richard Rapport is near to 2700 ELO! A very young-talented player

     
  • 7 months ago

    sixtyfoursquares

    I think China will be a dominant player in Chess soon; with about 7 Male Players in the top 100 and about 10 Female Players in the top 50!!

    India is lagging behind for its size of population playing chess with only 3 Male Players (including Anand) in the top 100 and 3 Female Players in the top 50.

  • 7 months ago

    yashar04

    It's hard to be 2785 and still have to play a guy with about 100 rating points above you! Magnus's rating is just crazy!!

  • 7 months ago

    TheMagicianPaul

    Sad to see Luke McShane in 73rd spot with a 2674 rating. I mean it's very, very good level, but it would be cool if he somehow got back to 2700. He always brought excitement in the London Chess Classic tournament (back in the days with classic time control), and competed toe-to-toe with the best players in the world, even tho he's an amateur. As for the top guys, nobody is challenging Carlsen anytime soon, unless he decides to quit chess, goes ludacris or something else crazy happens to him...

  • 7 months ago

    FanOfCarlsen

    Anand ke liye Delhi bahot door hai abhi..

  • 7 months ago

    ErwinSachs

    Looks like the strongest ever field for the Norway tourney....

    http://norwaychess.com/en/new-player-confirmed-for-norway-chess/#more-12212

  • 7 months ago

    volencho

    Veskooooooo why????????????

  • 7 months ago

    senthurbharathi

    congrats anand....

  • 7 months ago

    sixtyfoursquares

    The WCC 2014 should be interesting if World No.1 is playing World No.3!!

    Ranking-wise also Anand has shut the mouth of his naysayers.

    Let us now look forward to some fireworks!!

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