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(Another) Strong Start for Spoelman at Revived Dutch Championship

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 7/8/14, 2:42 PM.

Last year he started with 3.0/3, and this year it's not much worse. GM Wouter Spoelman, who rarely plays chess these days as he is very busy with his studies, is leading the Dutch Championship with 2.5/3, ahead of GMs Loek van Wely and Sipke Ernst.

The tournament, which has a new main organizer, is completely revived and has lots of nice side events.

The Dutch Championship had lost some of its glamour in recent years, but now, with a new tournament director (Paul Rump), a daily host (Tex de Wit) and several cultural side events, the Dutch Chess Federation can already be satisfied with the event -- even though it's just three days old.

For starters, the tournament is held at a brand new location: the Manor Hotel Amsterdam, in the east of the Dutch capital, but still rather central. The historic building started as hospital a long time ago: the Burgerziekenhuis (Citizen's Hospital), which was designed by architect A.L. van Gendt and opened in 1891.

The former Burgerziekenhuis, now a hotel

One famous Dutchman born in the hospital is Johan Cruijff. According to a book about the history of the hotel, the football player, already famous, once returned to the hospital suffering from headaches. “What do you do for a living?” the neurologist asked. “I'm playing football,” Cruijff answered. “Well, you have to stop using your head then!” said the doctor.

The official website is new as well, and a quick glance shows that a lot is going on in that Manor Hotel. There is daily commentary by the aforementioned Tex de Wit, an FM but also a professional stand-up comedian who performed at the opening ceremony. He is joined by a different Dutch grandmaster (often a former champion!) every day. And each day the commentary is paused for a moment for a “cultural intermezzo,” about art, theater, literature or poetry -- an excellent idea.

However, the commentary would attact more spectators if there weren't another tournament in Amsterdam at the same time. Somehow the organizers of both events haven't been able to figure out a schedule that allows the participants of the open tournament to visit the Dutch Championship, which is less than ten minutes away by bike.  A pity.

The commentary deserves more spectators.
GM Hans Ree explains the opening in Van Wely-Tiviakov from round 2.

On Monday night, after the round and in the playing hall, there was a theater performance by the famous Dutch actor Porgy Franssen, whose one-hour monologue was based on Stefan Zweig's famous novel Die Schachnovelle. Another splendid side event which makes this year's championship a special one.

On Tuesday afternoon, there was a lecture about chess and literature, and for Wednesday a “chess pop quiz” was scheduled. That last item had to be cancelled, though -- basically because the whole country has something else to do tomorrow night! The organizer, GM Dimitri Reinderman, intends to hold it next year.

The “cultural emphasis” can also be seen in the playing hall. Four pieces of art are placed alongside the tables and chairs, two by Ivon Drumman and two by the late Frans Fritschy. All in all, the organizers have succeeded in bringing chess back to where it belongs: as an important part of our culture, just like art, literature or theater!

The playing hall
Chess art by Ivon Drumman
One of the two pieces of art by Frans Fritschy
Chess players by Frans Fritschy -- for more info on the artist see this article.

Unfortunately the tournament is a rather short event as both the Dutch Championship and the Dutch Women's Championship are 8-player round robins, and so there are only seven rounds. Another small disappointment: the organizers didn't manage to contract Anish Giri (who will play in Biel), Ivan Sokolov, or Jan Timman. 

The “open” group has GMs Loek van Wely (2657), Sergey Tiviakov (2656), Erwin l'Ami (2650), Robin van Kampen (2630), Dimitri Reinderman (2604), Benjamin Bok (2586), Wouter Spoelman, and Sipke Ernst (2554).

After three rounds, the tournament has a surprising leader: Wouter Spoelman, who scored 2.5/3. Well, maybe it's not that surprising when you realize that he started even better last year, when he won his first three games! Somehow the 24-year-old medicine student can find his best shape when it matters, even though he plays rarely these days. Since last year, he played only one tournament (the Groningen Open in December) and some Bundesliga games.

GM Wouter Spoelman, a not-very-active but nonetheless strong grandmaster

In the first round, Spoelman defeated GM Erwin l'Ami, who did something wrong in a very sharp Nimzo-Indian and got into a worse ending.

Not a great start for GM Erwin l'Ami

The next day, Spoelman got a better rook ending against reigning champion Dimitri Reinderman, and then converted the point convincingly:

Spoelman took revenge for a lost playoff last year, against the same opponent. 

There was some luck involved, too. In the third round, Spoelman escaped against the top seed, Loek van Wely, who at some point was two healthy pawns up. But in time trouble, “KingLoek” sacrificed one of them, only to realize that the queen ending was very hard to win.

GM Loek van Wely, the top seed in Amsterdam

In the first round, Van Wely had started with a nice victory over Robin van Kampen, who took too much risk as Black in the opening:

Dutch Championship 2014 | Round 3 Standings

# Name Rtg Perf 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts SB
1 Spoelman,Wouter 2571 2916 phpfCo1l0.png ½ 1 1 2.5/3
2 Van Wely,Loek 2657 2741 ½ phpfCo1l0.png ½ 1 2.0/3 3.00
3 Ernst,Sipke 2554 2733 phpfCo1l0.png ½ ½ 1 2.0/3 2.00
4 Tiviakov,Sergey 2656 2633 ½ phpfCo1l0.png ½ ½ 1.5/3
5 Reinderman,Dimitri 2604 2474 0 ½ ½ phpfCo1l0.png 1.0/3 1.75
6 L'Ami,Erwin 2650 2450 0 ½ phpfCo1l0.png ½ 1.0/3 1.50
7 Van Kampen,Robin 2636 2513 0 ½ phpfCo1l0.png ½ 1.0/3 1.25
8 Bok,Benjamin 2586 2493 0 ½ ½ phpfCo1l0.png 1.0/3 1.00

The years that Zhaoqin Peng was dominating the women's section are over. In 2012, Tea Lanchava took the title, and last year Lisa Schut won. But Peng should probably still be considered the slight favorite - -she is going for her fourteenth(!) title, by the way!

GM Zhaoqin Peng

Anne Haast had started with 2.0/2, but on Tuesday she lost to Bianca Muhren-De Jong:

Dutch Women's Championship 2014 | Round 3 Standings

# Name Rtg Perf 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Pts SB
1 Peng Zhaoqin 2402 2346 phpfCo1l0.png 1 1 0 2.0/3 3.00
2 Haast,Anne 2296 2382 phpfCo1l0.png 1 0 1 2.0/3 3.00
3 Padurariu,Smaranda 2205 2326 0 phpfCo1l0.png 1 1 2.0/3 2.00
4 Muhren-De Jong,Bianca 2296 2243 1 0 phpfCo1l0.png ½ 1.5/3 2.75
5 Paulet,Iozefina 2227 2241 0 ½ phpfCo1l0.png 1 1.5/3 1.25
6 Hortensius,Lisa 2162 2237 0 phpfCo1l0.png 1 ½ 1.5/3 1.25
7 Lanchava,Tea 2286 2167 1 0 0 phpfCo1l0.png 1.0/3
8 Kazarian,Anna-Maja 2025 1919 0 0 ½ phpfCo1l0.png 0.5/3

The Dutch Championship takes place 5-13 July in Hotel Manor in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. The games can be followed live here. Games via TWICphpfCo1l0.png

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Comments


  • 2 months ago

    KMagik

    @awesomechess1729 in 2009, which means that shortly before he entered Medical University.

    Which probably makes him a prodigy, although you never know these days.

  • 2 months ago

    awesomechess1729

    When did Spoelman become a grandmaster? If he rarely play chess now because he is a medical school student, but he is already a grandmaster at 24, then he must have been some kind of child (or adolescent) chess prodigy.

  • 2 months ago

    _valentin_

    Why "slight favorite" -- Zhaoqin Peng is 100+ points over her nearest rival...?

  • 2 months ago

    DM_knight

    I like when you give variation that goes for some other games but can you also post the result of that game's variation?it will be helpful :)

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