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Beijing GP: Grischuk & Mamedyarov Maintain Lead, Karjakin Loses Again

  • webmaster
  • on 7/12/13, 10:18 AM.

Going into the second and last rest day, Alexander Grischuk and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov are still in shared first place at the FIDE Grand Prix in Beijing. Both players drew their games in round 8, against Anish Giri and Wang Yue respectively. Sergey Karjakin suffered his third straight loss, with White against Veselin Topalov. In the game between the 40-year-olds, Boris Gelfand defeated Vassily Ivanchuk.

These are tough times for Sergey Karjakin, who made such a strong impression during the first half of the tournament. The 23-year-old Russian grandmaster lost yet again, this time with the white pieces to Veselin Topalov. The game started as a Taimanov Sicilian where White played the English Attack, the main line against so many Sicilians these days. By putting his king's bishop on e7, Topalov managed to steer the game into a Scheveningen/Najdorf type of position where White's Qd2-f2 and Nc2-e3-g2 are less useful than e.g. h2-h4 and g4-g5. The ending that appeared on the board was slightly better for Black, but Karjakin might have kept things within the drawing zone until move 40, which was just a blunder. An excellent game by the Bulgarian, who has good chances now to finish either first or second in the overall Grand Prix standings (which qualify for the next Candidates tournament).

The only other decisive game was Boris Gelfand versus Vassily Ivanchuk, a Bayonet King's Indian with the old move 10.g3. (In the 1990s players like Vladimir Kramnik and Ivan Sokolov started to popularize 10.Re1 until it became the absolute main line.) The closed middlegame position required lots of piece maneuvering from both sides, and at some point the queens were traded. Just before the time control Gelfand missed the tactic 36. Nxe5! which would have decided the game immediately, but many hours later the Israeli grandmaster won anyway. In the final position 72...Nh7 73.Rh5 Rg7 74.Ke2 Ng5 75.Rh6 Nh3 was perhaps worth trying for Black.

Tournament leaders Alexander Grischuk and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov both drew their games with the black pieces. Grischuk played against Anish Giri, who started with 1.Nf3 but then transposed into a Sicilian, possibly in order to avoid the Berlin. It became a Classical Scheveningen where White's f4-f5 led to a massive series of exchanges.

Mamedyarov was a bit surprised by Wang Yue's choice of the Anti-Grünfeld and decided to avoid the theoretical lines by voluntarily trading on c3. White must have a tiny edge there, but not the way the Chinese played it. Black took over the initiative and declined a move repetition, but when White could suddenly take a pawn on the queenside, Mamedyarov was probably happy to draw after all.

Alexander Morozevich played the interesting and relatively new concept 4.c4!? in the 3.Bb5+ Sicilian. Wang Hao's moves looked healthy but 12...a5 weakened his queenside. The Russian GM demonstrated this with the surprising 14.Nc6!? and 15.Ne7!? and got some advantage, but the Chinese was never in serious danger.

Peter Leko and Gata Kamsky drew a Caro-Kann with 3...g6; a typical kind of opening for the American who likes solid, playable positions without too much theory. White seemed to be developing a dangerous initiative, but the queen trade 19...Qh4! and Kamsky's next few moves were very strong. Black's activity was just enough compensation for the pawn deficit.





Beijing GP 2013 | Scores

Round 1 15:00 CST 04.07.13   Round 2 15:00 CST 05.07.13
Giri 0-1 Karjakin   Karjakin 1-0 Wang Hao
Morozevich ½-½ Wang Yue   Grischuk ½-½ Ivanchuk
Gelfand 0-1 Topalov   Mamedyarov ½-½ Kamsky
Leko ½-½ Mamedyarov   Topalov ½-½ Leko
Kamsky 0-1 Grischuk   Wang Yue ½-½ Gelfand
Ivanchuk ½-½ Wang Hao   Giri ½-½ Morozevich
Round 3 15:00 CST 06.07.13   Round 4 15:00 CST 07.07.13
Morozevich 0-1 Karjakin   Karjakin ½-½ Grischuk
Gelfand 0-1 Giri   Mamedyarov 1-0 Wang Hao
Leko ½-½ Wang Yue   Topalov ½-½ Ivanchuk
Kamsky ½-½ Topalov   Wang Yue 1-0 Kamsky
Ivanchuk 0-1 Mamedyarov   Giri ½-½ Leko
Wang Hao ½-½ Grischuk   Morozevich 1-0 Gelfand
Round 5 15:00 CST 09.07.13   Round 6 15:00 CST 10.07.13
Gelfand ½-½ Karjakin   Karjakin 0-1 Mamedyarov
Leko ½-½ Morozevich   Topalov ½-½ Grischuk
Kamsky 0-1 Giri   Wang Yue 1-0 Wang Hao
Ivanchuk 1-0 Wang Yue   Giri ½-½ Ivanchuk
Wang Hao ½-½ Topalov   Morozevich 1-0 Kamsky
Grischuk 1-0 Mamedyarov   Gelfand ½-½ Leko
Round 7 15:00 CST 11.07.13   Round 8 15:00 CST 12.07.13
Leko 1-0 Karjakin   Karjakin 0-1 Topalov
Kamsky ½-½ Gelfand   Wang Yue ½-½ Mamedyarov
Ivanchuk 1-0 Morozevich   Giri ½-½ Grischuk
Wang Hao 1-0 Giri   Morozevich ½-½ Wang Hao
Grischuk 1-0 Wang Yue   Gelfand 1-0 Ivanchuk
Mamedyarov 1-0 Topalov   Leko ½-½ Kamsky
Round 9 15:00 CST 14.07.13   Round 10 15:00 CST 15.07.13
Kamsky - Karjakin   Karjakin - Wang Yue
Ivanchuk - Leko   Giri - Topalov
Wang Hao - Gelfand   Morozevich - Mamedyarov
Grischuk - Morozevich   Gelfand - Grischuk
Mamedyarov - Giri   Leko - Wang Hao
Topalov - Wang Yue   Kamsky - Ivanchuk
Round 11 13:00 CST 16.07.13        
Ivanchuk - Karjakin        
Wang Hao - Kamsky        
Grischuk - Leko        
Mamedyarov - Gelfand        
Topalov - Morozevich        
Wang Yue - Giri        

Beijing GP 2013 | Round 8 standings

# Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 Points SB
1 Grischuk,Alexander 2780 * 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½ 1 5.5/8 21.25
2 Mamedyarov,Shakhriyar 2761 0 * ½ 1 1 1 ½ 1 ½ 5.5/8 20.75
3 Leko,Peter 2737 ½ * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 4.5/8 17.50
4 Topalov,Veselin 2767 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 ½ 1 ½ 4.5/8 16.50
5 Ivanchuk,Vassily 2733 ½ 0 ½ * ½ 1 1 ½ 0 4.0/8 16.50
6 Karjakin,Sergey 2776 ½ 0 0 0 * 1 1 1 ½ 4.0/8 15.25
7 Giri,Anish 2734 ½ ½ ½ 0 * ½ 0 1 1 4.0/8 14.00
8 Wang,Yue 2705 0 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1 ½ 1 4.0/8 13.50
9 Morozevich,Alexander 2736 ½ 0 0 ½ ½ * ½ 1 1 4.0/8 12.75
10 Wang,Hao 2752 ½ 0 ½ ½ 0 1 0 ½ * 3.0/8 13.00
11 Gelfand,Boris 2773 ½ 0 1 ½ 0 ½ 0 * ½ 3.0/8 11.25
12 Kamsky,Gata 2763 0 ½ ½ ½ 0 0 0 ½ * 2.0/8

The 5th Grand Prix takes place 4-16 July, 2013 in Beijing, China. The games start 15:00 CST (09:00 CET, 03:00 EDT); the final round starts two hours earlier. Tournament website: http://beijing2013.fide.com. Photos by Anastasiya Karlovich courtesy of FIDE. Games via TWIC.

5906 reads 23 comments
4 votes

Comments


  • 15 months ago

    Marcokim

    Personally I don't see why any chess player would respond to the post of "Mr. Know it all": Marcokim. You chess players are wasteing your time with him. Just don't entertain this whale mouth and move on; you're taking up to much space responding to nonsense.

    The know-it-all was b2b2... at least I am not wrapping myself in an American flag and then sticking my finger up Uncle Sam. Hating on anything Western yet I am sure your family begged and prayed to get residency, I find the hypocrisy of your kind legendary.

    I once met a guy just like you - "I hate this country... blah, blah... i wish Nakamura loses the match... I hope Carlsen loses... blah, blah blah... screw the west...blah blah" - then I asked him have you considered taking your family back to Syria, I am sure Al Assad would love to put your tools in a vice. He laughed.

  • 16 months ago

    xxbro

    @marcokim he's not chubby! i guess you're too slim marco. eat more...

  • 16 months ago

    Marcokim

    b2b2,

    nothing personal... its just that I don't like know it alls. I would have prefered you just say "I am not sure how the selection is done but I guess the ratings are important"

    And I would have said "Ratings are important but I know they also use other criteria. Also at times its just a buddy system, if I know a player I will invite him. However I am sure ratings do matter a lot, they are just not the only way. But mostly the local sponsors want to have a few local players."

    The above conversation actually involved an exchange of useful info. I did not claim to know everything, I just said I have seen French organizers (for example) call a GM cuz he speaks French - assuming he is at least 2700+. Or some players interview well and they get called (assuming again that they are strong).  

  • 16 months ago

    Blastingchess

    I think Marcokim and b2b2 both made some good points. but one thing that both don't mentionned about this Beijing tournament is that its part of the Grand prix cycle and that implies specific rules concerning its organisations, for ex. players have to play four tournament in the cycle, etc..it's another thing to consider.

    in a way a "filler" in a grand prix tournament is a player that is invited as a replacement isntead of a player competing o qualify to the next candidates tournament.

    of course that doesn't mean that this player can't win the tournament (a bit unlikely but still a real possibility). and it's clear that the choice of replacement players is not made only according to the rating list. the higher rated th player is the more likely he gets invited but I thin the nationality and the carreer as a whole of the player is often more important.

  • 16 months ago

    b2b2

    @MarcoKim,

    I should have known, you do not even play chess at this site. You have no rating, no games, no history.  All your posts are criticisms of other people's comments, often laced with profanity.  Goodbye persona non grata. 

  • 16 months ago

    Marcokim

    b2b2

    - Karjakin is not true to himself and plays the opponent, not the board.
    - Mamedyarov tries harder, but is not as gifted as the others.
    - Grischuk 1st: talent, experience, and the absence of Kramnik, Carlsen, Anand, and Aronian (not sure about Caruana).
    - Leko is solid as a rock and may take 2nd or 3rd.
    - Gelfand is not prepared and will be lucky to place.
    - Topalov can be a spoiler but he is retiring and lacks the drive.
    - The rest are fillers.

    Conjencture at work... lala land syndrome.Imagine the truth and it shall be.

    -"Karjakin plays the opponent...." I am guessing your Russian is better than mine.

    -"Mamedyarov tries harder....not as talented"... yeah I am sure the chubby Arzhabi spends his nights reading chess theory in the cold maountains of Arzhabaijan.

    -"Grishuik... first talent"... I am sure his mother told you he begun playing chess in the womb with her overies. I am not sure Kramnik and Anand are better than Grishuik. Tell me the last tournament Kramnik and Anand placed top 3.

    -"Leko is solid as a rock..." I thought he was a "filler"... heck "feel-her" sounds better

    -"Gelfand is not prepared..." Not prepared he just won a Cat 21 tournament last week.

    -"Topalov is a spoiler and lacks the drive..." psychology 101, a former world no.1 lacks the drive to win a tournament, maybe he just needs money for rent.

    -"The rest are fillers..." Anish the strongest junior in the world, Ivanchuk the crazy genius, Wang Hao (the strongest Chinese GM 2750+), Wang Yue (Chinese), Mamedyarov (World Rapid champion, World blitz runner-up, Tal Memorial top 4, Morosevich who at the age of 21yrs was the world no.2, runner up world rapid....

    I think the need for intellectual approval may be hurting your ability to be honest to yourself and improve yourself. I am weary of smart arses, I prefer a fool to a smart arse, at least the fool will learn and become wise, the smart arse will wallow in self delusion.


  • 16 months ago

    Marcokim

    @b2b2,

    I happen to know how some of these things work. Most of the sponsors want to have at least the best local player(s) in the tournament. Thats all that matters to them. In this case Yue and Hao are probably enough. Manytimes the sponsors representative is a 30something woman who thinks chess is a card game, its not like she will impose her "list" on you.

    Then you have 30 very good players to chose from. Ivanchuk is charismatic and popular, Anish is young and photogenic, then maybe cold call some strong players. Mamedyarov and Morosevich are very exciting attacking players, Gelfand is a top GM... of course there may be some "fillers" or 2nd choices, but I know there is a little more sophistication than using a crude live rating from the internet... otherwise my grandma could organize an event with google and a fone.

    Sometimes organizers can meet players in tournaments and build a rapport and invite them personally. Sometimes you want to bring a mix of ages, nationalities - we all know that any 2700+GM can beat. Like anything in life, personable personalities will get more invites given equal rating. Maybe you attended a tournament and stayed in the same hotel as Nipomneshi, and he taught you a thing or 2 about openings, probably shared a whiskey together, then when you get the chance you invite him.

    Thats how the world works... not some robot looking at live ratings and calling international numbers. C'mon, how old are you? Thats how the world works.

  • 16 months ago

    b2b2

    @Marcokim,

    Apparently, you have never held a title.  The impact of a tournament's category affects the sponsors, the players, the organizers, and the FIDE. 

    - Organizer's need sponsors for tournaments (people who put up the $$) 
    - Sponsors (banks, conglomerates, etc.) know nothing about chess but want the strongest players, and the rule of thumb is the FIDE rating list (which is also used to determine pairings.)
    - The higher the rating of players the easier it is to get sponsors to put up big $$.

    - Because ratings are tied to invitations and $$ players want to maximize their rating.
    - The players themselves do not wish to play lower ranked players because the gain in points from winning is negligible compared to the loss of points from losing.
    - This partially explains why there are so many draws, because the rating formula does not penalize you as much.
    - This also explains why the top 10 ranked players are very selective in their tournaments.  (Carlsen and Anand are preparing for a match but why didn't Aronian, Caruana, Nakamura, or Kramnik play?)

    - FIDE determines which tournaments feed into the Championship cycle.
    - FIDE also maintains the rating list.

  • 16 months ago

    Marcokim

    b2b2

    If you know the FIDE categories then you know what I mean by "filler".  Typically, the top 10 FIDE rated players are invited.  When they turn down the invitation, the organizers must find someone to fill their places.

    The tournament organizers were turned down by Carlsen, Anand, Aronian, Kramnik, and probably Caruana).  This is why Wang Yue, Anish Giri, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Morozevich, and even Peter Leko were asked to play in the tournament. 

    Instead of having a category 22 rated Tournament you have a category 20 rated tournament.  The highest rated tournaments have been category 22, with an average from 2776 to 2800.

    Plenty of rational sounding arguments such as this one are pulled out of ones arse - they sound right but are often misleading.

    Tournament organizers are not some zombies who look at the live rating lists and start cold calling GMs. There are 20 - 30players in the world who can win any top tournament. The organizers might look at contrasting styles, mix up the ages a bit, sometimes charisma does play a part, recent victories, players who will give interesting insights after the match. To say that 2700+ GMs were merely fillers for some other people is patronizing at best.

    Carlsen is a top GM and very consistent, but he is not that much better than the rest, he is no Bobby Fischer. Aronian is tired and hasn't won a tournament in a long long time. Carlsen won the candidates by a hair's breadth. Mamedyarov and Morosevich won the world rapid and finished second in the world blitz. Another strong GM the vietnamese La Quang Liem the winner of the world blitz and a very positional player would probably have been considered. Wang Yue is Chinese and a very strong GM, a filler are u kidding me? Ivanchuk is a genius on the board despite his inconsistency, they love Chucky. Peter Leko has been a top 20 GM for more than 8yrs. Anish is only 19yrs and is already 2740+, even Karjakin wasn't that strong at 19yrs.

    As for Categories anything above Cat 19 is Academic. There are very strong 2650 to 2720 GMs out there and maybe they don't play enough to improve their rating but they are by no means whipping boys. The cuban GM (forget his name) is a good example, the guy was 2680 a year ago but has been consistently beating 2750+ GMs and winning tournaments convincingly. I predict that the average elo for the top 10 will come down to reflect actual relative strength... because the truth is that even Carlsen is not much better than a 2700 GM (ask him what happened when he played Wang Yue with white and underestimated his oponent, he was demolished), so its good to mix it up in tournaments because all these guys are very good.



  • 16 months ago

    b2b2

    If you know the FIDE categories then you know what I mean by "filler".  Typically, the top 10 FIDE rated players are invited.  When they turn down the invitation, the organizers must find someone to fill their places.

    The tournament organizers were turned down by Carlsen, Anand, Aronian, Kramnik, and probably Caruana).  This is why Wang Yue, Anish Giri, Vassily Ivanchuk, Alexander Morozevich, and even Peter Leko were asked to play in the tournament. 

    Instead of having a category 22 rated Tournament you have a category 20 rated tournament.  The highest rated tournaments have been category 22, with an average from 2776 to 2800.

  • 16 months ago

    SebLeb0210

    this is a good tournament so far :)

  • 16 months ago

    xxbro

    @b2b2: "Mamedyarov ... as not gifted as the others."

    peh peh peh what a finding! (but maybe sexier)

  • 16 months ago

    Melchizedek10

    Chess is a mentally exhausted game...today the competition is more fierce then ever with the help of technology...These super GMs can feel proud at the end of the day whether win or lose that they belong in the elite group and their great memorial games are left behind for all to learn and enjoy...of course beside the great feeling of winning a great mind battle game...the two games win today truly illustrated the intense battle of the mind..

  • 16 months ago

    drumdaddy

    Ivanchuk defeated Carlsen and Kramnick in the candidates matches this spring. That makes him quite a good "filler".

  • 16 months ago

    b2b2

    - Karjakin is not true to himself and plays the opponent, not the board.
    - Mamedyarov tries harder, but is not as gifted as the others.
    - Grischuk 1st: talent, experience, and the absence of Kramnik, Carlsen, Anand, and Aronian (not sure about Caruana).
    - Leko is solid as a rock and may take 2nd or 3rd.
    - Gelfand is not prepared and will be lucky to place.
    - Topalov can be a spoiler but he is retiring and lacks the drive.
    - The rest are fillers.

  • 16 months ago

    hohohohihihi

    ivanchuck is bored of playing the game with the same moves for more than 30 years i think is time for him to either take a long braak or just to retire. it happens

  • 16 months ago

    Juan_Merlino

    Cant see why Ivanchuk has resigned in that position.

  • 16 months ago

    Sahasrara

    Aw darn, Karjakin started off so well and now on a losing streak, he can still catch up but needs to go back to his winning ways. 

  • 16 months ago

    CP6033

    good win Gelfand

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