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Candidates Tournament Round 6

  • SonofPearl
  • on 3/21/13, 1:41 PM.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
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It was another day of high excitement and fighting chess at the 2013 Candidates Tournament in London, with Magnus Carlsen winning his third game of the event against Peter Svidler.

As soon as Carlsen achieved the freeing central pawn break with 17...d5 his pieces were more active and the pressure gradually increased on Svidler until he blundered with 33.Qh5, losing his bishop and the game.

Magnus Carlsen scored his third win

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Carlsen's result was his second win with the black pieces

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The next game to finish was the clash between Vladimir Kramnik and Vassily Ivanchuk.  Kramnik was still looking for his first win after Lev Aronian miraculously slipped through his fingers yesterday, and with Ivanchuk once again burning a lot of time on the clock early in the game it looked good for the Russian.

Kramnik took advantage of Ivanchuk's time trouble by launching a direct sacrificial attack on his king.  But a rook down, Kramnik couldn't find a knockout blow for his attack and decided to repeat moves, despite Ivanchuk having just 1 minute left and 10 moves still to play before the first time control! 

Kramnik explained in the post match press conference, "If Vassily had 5 seconds left, then I would continue, but with one minute...", and joked,"Players are not blundering pieces to me!"

Win-less Vladimir Kramnik - unlucky so far?

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Carlsen may have had hopes of being the sole leader of the tournament, but Lev Aronian's perseverance in a long game with Teimour Radjabov was rewarded with a blunder from his opponent when 53. Nxe5 lost on the spot.

Lev Aronian, "I was very frustrated, but I got lucky"

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Teimour Radjabov's blunder proved costly

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It was also Lev Aronian's second win with black

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The last game to finish looked like being another win for the black pieces, but Boris Gelfand somehow managed to squander a winning position against Alexander Grischuk in a game where both players struggled to manage their clock time.

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Time-trouble addict Alexander Grischuk 

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Boris Gelfand missed a good chance for a win

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Alexander Grischuk and Boris Gelfand have both yet to win a game

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The standings after six rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 3
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 3
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 2
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740 2


Tomorrow (Friday) is the second rest day and two questions suggest themselves as we approach the halfway point of the tournament. Firstly, is the winner already between Lev Aronian and Magnus Carlsen who are 1½ points clear of the rest of the field? And secondly, is the time control (with no increments until move 60) having a significant effect on the results of the games?

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Anastasiya Karlovich at the official website, and Ray Morris-Hill (where indicated).

18597 reads 122 comments
6 votes

Comments


  • 16 months ago

    chichito

    bolshevikhellraiser yes he always uses the same shirt and I think it is more a tactical stratergy, I heard that the dark blue and small white lines affect his opponent's concentration 

  • 16 months ago

    Champeknight

    Carlsen is the best player right now. He will be retiring as the greatest ever.

  • 16 months ago

    JustanAmateur

    i went yesterday, atmosphere was brilliant in the playing hall. Carlsen and Aronian seemed to be more relaxed than the others

  • 16 months ago

    bolshevikhellraiser

    Is it just me or is radjabov is always whereing a blue and white striped shirt. Did he lose his luggage on the plane? 

  • 16 months ago

    neomaniac

    In all fairness though, I do think this Candidates format is quite ridiculous. It is pretty clear that MC and LA are playing far more dynamic chess than is Anand.

  • 16 months ago

    neomaniac

    It's been an amazing dynamic tournament so far. I am afraid Anand is very unlikely to be able to defend his title against either Magnus or Lev. On the flip side, if he does then I believe he can legitimately stake his claim as one of the greatest in chess history.

  • 16 months ago

    klasl09

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 16 months ago

    mueller

    The time control is as long as any you'll find. 
    "The time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra 1 hour for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes with a 30 second increment to finish." 

    So 40 moves in 2 hours, at which point you get an additional hour for moves 40-60. Then at move 60, you get 15 minutes and a 30 second increment per move.

    Anyone is welcome to show me a top level classical tournament with longer time controls. If the tournament uses the 30 second increment from move 1, they almost always start with 90 minutes for 40 moves, or only get 30 minutes at move 40. The players time troubles are entirely their own fault for mismanaging things or due their opponents forced them to use a lot of time by playing good accurate moves quickly. 

     

  • 16 months ago

    chessdoggblack

    As a social chess scientist and chess player I have made yet another starling discovery. Frist: Carlsen has admitted to the chess world in game 5 that he underestimated Ivanchuk. Like Gelfand he thought this game would be just another walk in the park...not so. In other words, he disrespected "Ivan the terrible" chess skills and the man himself...wrong move. Secondly: my discovery of Carlsen's weakness is not in his chess ability but in his human character: he has negative innate signs of brattiness. This was discovered by me in his press conference after his crushing round 5 disappointing draw against Ivanchuk. Carlsen's chess attitude: "I don't care 2 cents about any other chess players in this world." I have been made into a chess God and no one can destroy me. I believe that Anand understands this weakness and will be prepared to destroy this myth.

  • 16 months ago

    NM Cryptochess

    Having no increment in such a high-level tournament is utterly ridiculous. This is having a clear effect - a great number of games are being spoiled or just outright lost due to time. There just isn't any good excuse for this when a simple 5-second increment essentially eliminates the problem. 

  • 16 months ago

    Zinsch

    @chess25863: Because Carlsen is way past his prime, right? Wink

  • 16 months ago

    Dnyan-TheWarrior

    Really Happy For Carlsen & Aronian and also for Anand...

    Because the Margin with which MC & LA are winning will answer who is the best Challenger in the World for World Championship...

    Also When one of them meets Anand, result will tell Who is best player on the earth without questioning!

  • 16 months ago

    Anatoly_Sergievsky

    Round 8 is going to be clutch: Carlsen v. Aronian.

  • 16 months ago

    chess25836

    @Sahasrara just because he beat kramnik earlier doesnot mean he can do it now

  • 16 months ago

    reboc

    @Adrian_Kinnersley - totally agree that this candidates format is somewhat bogus and arbitrary.

    If chess must have a World Championship, it should simply be an annual tournament of the 10 highest rated players.

    Other great sports (tennis comes to mind) don't have a world championship at all, and great players' status is simply determined by how long they were number one, and how many tournaments they won.

    FIDE, get rid of the chess world championship! 

  • 16 months ago

    Sahasrara

    @Chess actually Carlsen has beaten Kramnik with black before, so it is possible to happen again. 

  • 16 months ago

    dancentino

    if Hou is MCs girlfriend then i'll be for Magnus..Wink

  • 16 months ago

    Marcokim

    I hear a lot of criticism about Carlsen not being a sensational tactical player... Kasparov is more dynamic... blah blah blah...

    If you are rated below 2200+ (most of us are), you simply aren't skilled enough to make such an assessment. I know you want to see fireworks cause thats what you understand, but most GM games are won on deep strategy not club level tactics. Even Kasparov launched his attacks on the back of a deeper strategy thats why they worked. Magnus has a more positional style but the basic fundamentals are the same.

    Karpov once said, "the difference between me and Kasparov isn't our reading of the game, its the type of car we use to get there... Kaparov prefers a Ferrari, me on the other hand prefer a Horse Carriage... eventually the result is the same, we all arrive. But I prefer the beauty of positional precision play to the fireworks of tactical brilliance. You can say I am a romantic." (Anatoly Karpov)

  • 16 months ago

    layphyu

    @Masterexplode23 After Nxf7 then Kxf7 Qxg6+ Ke6! Bf5!? Qe8! or Qa7! seem good for black either way and white just loses a piece for no compensation. what i meant is after Nxf7 white just giving away a piece and black is up big advantage.

  • 16 months ago

    chess25836

    @Zinsch i mean that he is not invincible. Although he is the best player now, he is not the best player of all time

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