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Candidates Tournament Round 6

  • SonofPearl
  • on 3/21/13, 1:41 PM.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
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It was another day of high excitement and fighting chess at the 2013 Candidates Tournament in London, with Magnus Carlsen winning his third game of the event against Peter Svidler.

As soon as Carlsen achieved the freeing central pawn break with 17...d5 his pieces were more active and the pressure gradually increased on Svidler until he blundered with 33.Qh5, losing his bishop and the game.

Magnus Carlsen scored his third win

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Carlsen's result was his second win with the black pieces

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The next game to finish was the clash between Vladimir Kramnik and Vassily Ivanchuk.  Kramnik was still looking for his first win after Lev Aronian miraculously slipped through his fingers yesterday, and with Ivanchuk once again burning a lot of time on the clock early in the game it looked good for the Russian.

Kramnik took advantage of Ivanchuk's time trouble by launching a direct sacrificial attack on his king.  But a rook down, Kramnik couldn't find a knockout blow for his attack and decided to repeat moves, despite Ivanchuk having just 1 minute left and 10 moves still to play before the first time control! 

Kramnik explained in the post match press conference, "If Vassily had 5 seconds left, then I would continue, but with one minute...", and joked,"Players are not blundering pieces to me!"

Win-less Vladimir Kramnik - unlucky so far?

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Carlsen may have had hopes of being the sole leader of the tournament, but Lev Aronian's perseverance in a long game with Teimour Radjabov was rewarded with a blunder from his opponent when 53. Nxe5 lost on the spot.

Lev Aronian, "I was very frustrated, but I got lucky"

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Teimour Radjabov's blunder proved costly

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It was also Lev Aronian's second win with black

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The last game to finish looked like being another win for the black pieces, but Boris Gelfand somehow managed to squander a winning position against Alexander Grischuk in a game where both players struggled to manage their clock time.

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Time-trouble addict Alexander Grischuk 

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Boris Gelfand missed a good chance for a win

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Alexander Grischuk and Boris Gelfand have both yet to win a game

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The standings after six rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872
Levon Aronian ARM 2809
Peter Svidler RUS 2747 3
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810 3
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757 2
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740 2


Tomorrow (Friday) is the second rest day and two questions suggest themselves as we approach the halfway point of the tournament. Firstly, is the winner already between Lev Aronian and Magnus Carlsen who are 1½ points clear of the rest of the field? And secondly, is the time control (with no increments until move 60) having a significant effect on the results of the games?

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Anastasiya Karlovich at the official website, and Ray Morris-Hill (where indicated).

18842 reads 122 comments
6 votes

Comments


  • 17 months ago

    forrie

    b1: "I've got to wonder about the round-robin format. If Carlsen and Aronian pull away to an extent that makes it impossible for the rest of the contestants to win, what is the the motivation for the rest to give 110%."

    I also thought about whether this is the best format. One player can have a off game now (and blunder) and a good game later depending on how he feels - this can have a huge influence on whether the leader is 0 or 0.5 point ahead. Let say Lev and MC is equal until the last round then whether their opponents have an "off" day may have a huge influence.

    Was the candidate matches (of 6 games) that was played in the 60 and 70's not perhaps the best format?

  • 17 months ago

    Zinsch

    Actually it's Svidler, who tried a cheap endgame trick on Carlsen. And see, what it got him. He lost a piece and the game.

  • 17 months ago

    JEMORANGE

    @vodkarov. There is no such thing as cheap endgame tricks... Chess is a war, you play on your strengths and not your opponent's. Magnus proves that the endgame is the most important part of the entire game when all other players are stressing over having an advantage in the opening. Magnus does not care as much about the opening. He downright shows why hes better than anyone else.

  • 17 months ago

    stupid_chess

    go magnus!

  • 17 months ago

    Ecurbetneilav628

    My favourite Lev Aronian will clash with Alexander Grischuk in round seven...Hope Lev will win the match...GO..GO..GO..!!!!!

  • 17 months ago

    Ecurbetneilav628

    Aronian or Carlsen???? Depends.....who got a strong nerve will win the match!!!!!

  • 17 months ago

    zhouwei

    Aronian will be the next world champion. He leads the trend of creation on attack.

  • 17 months ago

    Ecurbetneilav628

    BLUNDER??? It happened to all players when they are in a critical situation and because of the pressure in the game they could not escape from mistakes...i believe that the guy who has a strong nerve, calm and concentrating well during the match...will always win!!!

  • 17 months ago

    diogens

    It was not so easy, at least for me, to see Radjabovs blunder on the spot.

    After Qxe4+, move the king, QxN, white has the discovered Bh6+, Kf6, Bg5+, Ke6/Kf5, QxQ, KxQ, BxB and seems that white saves the piece, but then Rd2 and white pawns begin to fall.

  • 17 months ago

    Ecurbetneilav628

    You're absolutely right Andrew...that's why chess participants should be mentally and physically fit before competing the tournament and although they are not using physical strength during the game but mentally, they are consuming a lot of energy when they clash on the chess board...

  • 17 months ago

    vodkarov

    I disagree with you @Champeknight. And I don't like the time controls used in this tournament, with no increments before move 60. I think 30 seconds per move should be reasonable to avoid some blunders in a serious competition like this.

  • 17 months ago

    Champeknight

    Cheap endgame tricks????? Anand as best chess player on earth???? Aronian is a contender but Magnus is simply superior.

  • 17 months ago

    vodkarov

    Like I predicted Aronian is doing a good job with his very creative and strong play, while MC insists in his cheap endgame tricks.

    I hope Aronian will win the tournament and qualify to the match against the best player on earth, the champ Vishy Anand!

  • 17 months ago

    b1_

    I've got to wonder about the round-robin format. If Carlsen and Aronian pull away to an extent that makes it impossible for the rest of the contestants to win, what is the the motivation for the rest to give 110%.

    Also annoying is the challenger to a match-play world championship is being decided by a round-robin tournament.

  • 17 months ago

    friendjonny

    Ooo! The next three games have Carlsen up aginst the three highest rated opponents of the tournament. We may see Aronian pull ahead a little before the next rest day. 

    Rooting for Carlsen this year. I want Carlsen to become world champion. Then I want him to defend that championship against a few oldies (like Kramnik). And then I want a fantastic rivalry between Carlsen and Aronian for the future!

  • 17 months ago

    abotass

    can we get some more annotations on some future rounds?

    i really enjoyed them

  • 17 months ago

    Melvin_pariyadan

    now the question for me is aronian or carlsen

  • 17 months ago

    Ecurbetneilav628

    As I predicted yesterday Lev will win againts Radjabov...It is very unfortunate Radjabov blundered on his 53rd move Nxe5 and loss the game...great games!!!

  • 17 months ago

    titust

    Magnus Carlsen is playing well so far.

  • 17 months ago

    martin_caballero

    This is a great way to watch the games.  It's a fresh modern approach.  

    I like how time is and advantage are graphically displayed.  

    It works best during the live games.  Try it during the next round.  

    http://candidates2013.worldchess.com/#todays-pairings-view

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