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Candidates Tournament Round 7

  • SonofPearl
  • on 3/23/13, 1:46 PM.

Annotations by GM Sam Shankland
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The first half of the 2013 Candidates Tournament is over, and Magnus Carlsen and Lev Aronian have maintained their joint lead of 1½ points from the rest of the field. They meet again on Sunday in a crucial clash in round eight.

Today's seventh round was full of the usual hard-fought games we have become pleasantly accustomed to watching, yet none of them produced a decisive result. The nearest we came was in the game between Magnus Carlsen and Teimour Radjabov, but for once it was the world #1 who can count himself lucky to have survived.

Carlsen avoided a Radjabov opening speciality - the Sveshnikov - by choosing the 3.Bb5 line against the Sicilian. He then crippled Radjabov's queen-side pawn structure, but at the cost of allowing a dangerous initiative to develop for black on the kingside.  After 21.Qe4? Radjabov crashed through into Carlsen's position with 21...f3 and 22...Ng2 and looked like he would defeat the Norwegian. However, Carlsen's defensive exchange sacrifice blunted Radjabov's attack and he failed to find a clean finish in time trouble, allowing a repetition just before the time control.

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The photographers can't get enough of Magnus...

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The top seed and co-leader got into trouble today...

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...but he survived to stay as co-leader at the half-way point of the event

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Vassily Ivanchuk's opening of the day was the Scotch against Peter Svidler, which followed established theory for most of the game. Despite this, time trouble beckoned before a repetition ended the game at move 30.

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Peter Svidler relaxes before the game...

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...which finished in a draw

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Lev Aronian had the white pieces against Alexander Grischuk and found himself facing the Queen's Indian defence. Grischuk's backward pawn on d6 gave the Armenian some pressure, but piece exchanges left the position level and a draw was agreed after the first time control.

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Lev Aronian, watched closely by arbiter Adam Raoof

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Aronian's shirt deserves a colour photo!

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The result of the game was a draw

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The game between Boris Gelfand and Vladimir Kramnik was also a draw, but a careless slip from Kramnik with 18...Ne8? should have been punished by Gelfand with 19.Neg5. The moment passed, and Kramnik kept his unbeaten record.

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Vladimir Kramnik: Seven draws from seven games

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Boris Gelfand missed a fleeting opportunity

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The standings after seven rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Magnus Carlsen NOR 2872 5
Levon Aronian ARM 2809 5
Peter Svidler RUS 2747
Vladimir Kramnik RUS 2810
Teimour Radjabov AZE 2793 3
Alexander Grischuk RUS 2764 3
Vassily Ivanchuk UKR 2757
Boris Gelfand ISR 2740

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The 2013 Candidates Tournament runs from 14 March - 2 April in London, with the winner earning the right to challenge current world champion Vishy Anand for the title.

The tournament is an 8-player double round-robin event and the venue is The IET at 2 Savoy Place on the banks of the river Thames. The total prize fund is €510,000 (approx 665,000 USD). 

All rounds start at 14:00 GMT, and the time control is 2 hours for 40 moves, then an extra hour added for the next 20 moves, then 15 minutes more with a 30 second increment to finish.

The official FIDE website coverage is at london2013.fide.com.

Round-by-Round Pairings

Round 1  15/03/13   
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Round 2  16/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Teimour Radjabov  1 - 0 Vassily Ivanchuk 
Levon Aronian 1 - 0 Boris Gelfand
Round 3  17/03/13   
Boris Gelfand 0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vassily Ivanchuk  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Peter Svidler  1 - 0 Teimour Radjabov 
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Round 4  19/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen 1 - 0 Alexander Grischuk 
Teimour Radjabov  ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 5  20/03/13   
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Levon Aronian
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Round 6  21/03/13   
Peter Svidler  0 - 1 Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik ½ - ½ Vassily Ivanchuk 
Alexander Grischuk  ½ - ½ Boris Gelfand
Teimour Radjabov  0 - 1 Levon Aronian
Round 7  23/03/13   
Magnus Carlsen ½ - ½ Teimour Radjabov 
Levon Aronian ½ - ½ Alexander Grischuk 
Boris Gelfand ½ - ½ Vladimir Kramnik
Vassily Ivanchuk  ½ - ½ Peter Svidler 
Round 8  24/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Levon Aronian
Teimour Radjabov  Boris Gelfand
Alexander Grischuk  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Vladimir Kramnik Peter Svidler 
Round 9  25/03/13  
Vladimir Kramnik Magnus Carlsen
Peter Svidler  Alexander Grischuk 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Teimour Radjabov 
Boris Gelfand Levon Aronian
Round 10  27/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Boris Gelfand
Levon Aronian Vassily Ivanchuk 
Teimour Radjabov  Peter Svidler 
Alexander Grischuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Round 11  28/03/13  
Alexander Grischuk  Magnus Carlsen
Vladimir Kramnik Teimour Radjabov 
Peter Svidler  Levon Aronian
Vassily Ivanchuk  Boris Gelfand
Round 12  29/03/13  
Magnus Carlsen Vassily Ivanchuk 
Boris Gelfand Peter Svidler 
Levon Aronian Vladimir Kramnik
Teimour Radjabov  Alexander Grischuk 
Round 13  31/03/13  
Teimour Radjabov  Magnus Carlsen
Alexander Grischuk  Levon Aronian
Vladimir Kramnik Boris Gelfand
Peter Svidler  Vassily Ivanchuk 
Round 14  01/04/13
Magnus Carlsen Peter Svidler 
Vassily Ivanchuk  Vladimir Kramnik
Boris Gelfand Alexander Grischuk 
Levon Aronian Teimour Radjabov 

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Look out for details of Chess.com TV coverage of the event at this page.

Pictures by Ray Morris-Hill.

13944 reads 67 comments
6 votes

Comments


  • 20 months ago

    Dnyan-TheWarrior

    Carlsen seems to have too much Attitude...

    Down to earth approach of Champions like Anand, Messi, Federer,Schumi,Yelena,Jordan,Tendulkar, Tiger, Bolt or Mohammad Ali seems to be missing completely...

  • 20 months ago

    GoodGoodChess

    Go Carlsen! Go!!

  • 20 months ago

    Zinsch

    @Abduvohid: For this candidates tournament, the Grand Prix was no qualifier. It is, however, for the next one.

  • 20 months ago

    Uddipto

    wow.typically magnus

  • 20 months ago

    chess25836

    @machete68 its funny to watch a player who is not even rated above 1900 critising kramnik and gelfand who are MUCH MUCH better than him and know a lot more than his extremely LIMITED chess knowledge

  • 20 months ago

    Snajdan1308

    Gelfand is just a coward. The chess world was very lucky that he couldn't win the WC match against Anand.

  • 20 months ago

    Abduvohid

    What about Karjakin, Topalov? I suggest They won grand prix,Why don't they play in this very tournament? Thanks for explanation!Cool 

  • 20 months ago

    Balachandar

    Surely Carlsen's defence here is a masterpiece. He knows everything in chess, attack, endgame and defence. Wow. 

     

    And I think Kramnik played the Qb8 - Rc8 in an earlier game too. 

  • 20 months ago

    LaskerFan

    Magnus and Aronian are both tied in the top position - with differences:

    Aronian's middle-game strategy is superb; Magnus's endgame handling is perfection itself.

    Magnus dissipated Rajdabov's strong attack with a strong defense (Magnus made a mistake on move 23, as discussed by GM Kachiyan in chess.com TV; however Radjabov couldly not fully capitalize on it due to time trouble - he had only a few minutes left for 14 moves, so inaccuracy dissipated his attack, and he finally decided on a draw by repetition in the last 10-15 seconds or so rather than risk a loss on time); Aronian almost won his game against Grishcuk, but finally gave up against impeccable defense (if he captured Grishcuk's f-pawn on the 43rd move, he would have lost two pawns - f pawn, and either g or a pawn).

    Aronian sometimes run into time trouble; Magnus does not because of his younger and faster brain.

    From the play upto today and the point differences, it has become apparent that only one from these two will rise to be the challenger - none of the others will manage. Only time will tell who.

  • 20 months ago

    StevieBlues

    Ahh I see. Thanks for the info. Very surprising gelfand didn't see that isn't it? All his forces were in that area.

  • 20 months ago

    LaskerFan

    StevieBlues

    Can somebody elaborate on why Kramnik's 18... Ne8? is a mistake?

    As discussed by GM Kachiyan on chess.com TV, Gelfand could play 19.Neg5 (or even 19.Nfg5) after 18...Ne8 with a very strong (perhaps winning?) kingside attack.

  • 20 months ago

    carlsen_01

    A decisive result tomorrow in carlsen-aronian would decide the tournament outcome 😝 ..

  • 20 months ago

    PhoenixTTD

    The first time Magnus and Teimour repeated moves, Teimour broke the repetition with 32...h5.  The GM commentating here suggested 33 Nf2 Qf5 34 Qg2 and for Magnus to play for a win technically down a point but with lots of targets.  When asked why he repeated, he referred to after this and that he was not looking for a win.  It was clear to commentators on both feeds I was watching that he had a chance.  He did not notice because he said he was not looking for a win or there is something unsound with this line missed by the GM who suggested it.

  • 20 months ago

    Wappinschaw

    Carlsen looks shattered in the photograph!

  • 20 months ago

    pulpfriction

    Magnus stopped a penalty kick from Radjabov.  It adds to his invincibility image.  The second half will be interesting to watch.  Will the laggards lunge forward!

  • 20 months ago

    edpratomo

    the host always smiles to radjabov. got a crush on radjabov it seems. 

  • 20 months ago

    EternalChess

    Carlsen looked like he pulled an all-nighter, preparing too hard maybe? 

    You don't know Carlsen well :P He looks like he has no sleep every game! Innocent

  • 20 months ago

    PhoenixTTD

    http://new.livestream.com/WorldChess/Round7

     The second video has Carlen's post game interview for those who have not seen it.

  • 20 months ago

    Vlodior

    Please, tell me, what's wrong with Kramnik? He is the King of draws! In the last game with Gelfand they both two just don't WANT to play the game to the end. Endgame is the most exiting and the most difficult, but they thought that it's a draw!

  • 20 months ago

    Ptolemeu

    I think Gelfand didn't wanted to upset Kramnik,he thought a lot after Ne8 and i am sure he saw the winning moves with Ng5 with whatever Knight,but he choose to save him and made a move like Ned2 leading to a draw.

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