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Carlsen Crushes Anand at Tal, Gelfand & Nakamura Lead

  • webmaster
  • on 6/18/13, 10:41 AM.

The fifth round of the Tal Memorial was marked by Magnus Carlsen's crushing victory over Viswanathan Anand, the two players who will play a match for the world title later this year. It was over in a mere 29, and it wasn't even clear which was the decisive mistake! Boris Gelfand defeated Alexander Morozevich from the white side of a Benoni to catch Hikaru Nakamura in first place.

The Game of the Day started with the Simagin variation (5.Nge2) of the Rubinstein variation (4.e3) of the Nimzo-Indian. Carlsen explained this choice of opening as follows:

"I thought I'd play a line that he hasn't faced in a long time and I thought that hopefully he wouldn't be too prepared for that."

Carlsen then followed the same plan which Ponomariov had beaten Kramnik ten years ago in Wijk aan Zee: trading the black-squared bishops. The world number one felt that Black should have maneuvered is knight to d6 at some point; in the game Anand's decision to move his bishop from b7 to d5 was positionally sound, but tactically flawed.

The next time Carlsen and Anand will shake hands is in November in Chennai

Carlsen admitted that this win was probably more important than any other game in this tournament.

"I think it's good before the World Championship match to remind him that I can outplay him once in a while! Obviously between us there have been a lot of draws, recently at least. But I'm not going to g around and think that he's going to have such a bad day every day at the World Championship. I'll have to prepare for the worst, definitely. And to clarify, I don't mean to prepare for the worst, that I'm going to lose necessarily, but that he's going to be at his best and not give away anything free like today."

Carlsen also gave a comment about the news that he'll be playing in Saint Louis in September, not long before he has to be heading to India.

"I think it will be useful for me before the World Championship match because obviously the match will be tough and the players in the Saint Louis tournament are not only very strong, but also very tough characters, all of them, at the board, and thus it will be a good test, to have such an atmosphere before the World Championship match. Besides, I think not playing between this tournament till November will be too long a break for me. I'm still used to playing quite a few tournaments, and that's also part of my training."

Carlsen, obviously in a good mood at the press conference

In this round tournament leader Hikaru Nakamura was involved in a very uneventful game. In a Queen's Indian with 4.a3, he played the original 5.Bf4!? but didn't expect his opponent's setup of ...d7-d6 and ...Nbd7. One move 8 there were many interesting possibilities, but White's 8.dxc5 turned out to be just equal.

Another easy draw for Dmitry Andreikin

This allowed Boris Gelfand to catch Nakamura in first place. The Israeli nicely defeated Alexander Morozevich in a Benoni, where Black played a positional exchange sacrifice very early in the game - in fact it was all theory. Morozevich's follow-up wasn't accurate, though, and with the big series of exchanges that started at move 18, White got the upper hand. Gelfand's decisive combination deserves a puzzle:

A nice finishing touch by Boris Gelfand

Kramnik-Karjakin was for most of the game a quiet, positional ending that started as an English Four Knights. The players followed the game Kramnik-Anand, Zurich 2013 for a while, and when Karjakin deviated, very soon the queens were traded. White tried to create weaknesses on the kingside, but Karjakin's active defense was enough to draw the game comfortably.

The games Kramnik-Karjakin and Mamedyarov-Caruana

Mamedyarov and Caruana split the point in a 4.e3 Grünfeld where Black typically exchanged his white-squared bishop for the knight on f3 because he puts all his pawns on white squares - a bit like Carlsen did against Anand today! Caruana called his setup "solid", but felt that after White forced him to play ...b6, he was slightly worse. Mamedyarov could have hoped for an advantage with 41.Re3 Qf8 42.Qe1. In the game Caruana managed to close the h3-c8 diagonal after which the d-pawn would drop.



2013 Tal Memorial | Results & pairings

Round 1 15:00 MSK 13.06.13   Round 2 15:00 MSK 14.06.13
Andreikin ½-½ Morozevich   Morozevich ½-½ Mamedyarov
Anand 0-1 Caruana   Kramnik 0-1 Nakamura
Gelfand ½-½ Karjakin   Karjakin ½-½ Carlsen
Carlsen 1-0 Kramnik   Caruana 0-1 Gelfand
Nakamura 0-1 Mamedyarov   Andreikin ½-½ Anand
Round 3 15:00 MSK 15.06.13   Round 4 15:00 MSK 17.06.13
Anand 1-0 Morozevich   Morozevich ½-½ Kramnik
Gelfand ½-½ Andreikin   Karjakin ½-½ Mamedyarov
Carlsen 0-1 Caruana   Caruana 0-1 Nakamura
Nakamura 1-0 Karjakin   Andreikin ½-½ Carlsen
Mamedyarov ½-½ Kramnik   Anand ½-½ Gelfand
Round 5 15:00 MSK 18.06.13   Round 6 15:00 MSK 19.06.13
Gelfand 1-0 Morozevich   Morozevich - Karjakin
Carlsen 1-0 Anand   Caruana - Kramnik
Nakamura ½-½ Andreikin   Andreikin - Mamedyarov
Mamedyarov ½-½ Caruana   Anand - Nakamura
Kramnik ½-½ Karjakin   Gelfand - Carlsen
Round 7 15:00 MSK 21.06.13   Round 8 15:00 MSK 22.06.13
Carlsen - Morozevich   Morozevich - Caruana
Nakamura - Gelfand   Andreikin - Karjakin
Mamedyarov - Anand   Anand - Kramnik
Kramnik - Andreikin   Gelfand - Mamedyarov
Karjakin - Caruana   Carlsen - Nakamura
Round 9 13:00 MSK 23.06.13        
Nakamura - Morozevich        
Mamedyarov - Carlsen        
Kramnik - Gelfand        
Karjakin - Anand        
Caruana - Andreikin        

2013 Tal Memorial | Round 5 standings

# Player Rating 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 Points SB
1 Nakamura,H 2784 * 0 ½ 1 1 1 3.5/5 7.25
2 Gelfand,B 2755 * ½ 1 ½ ½ 1 3.5/5 7.25
3 Mamedyarov,S 2753 1 * ½ ½ ½ ½ 3.0/5 7.25
4 Carlsen,M 2864 * ½ 0 ½ 1 1 3.0/5 5.75
5 Andreikin,D 2713 ½ ½ ½ * ½ ½ 2.5/5 6.75
6 Caruana,F 2774 0 0 ½ 1 * 1 2.5/5 6.50
7 Karjakin,S 2782 0 ½ ½ ½ * ½ 2.0/5 5.50
8 Anand,V 2786 ½ 0 ½ 0 * 1 2.0/5 4.50
9 Morozevich,A 2760 0 ½ ½ 0 * ½ 1.5/5 3.50
10 Kramnik,V 2803 0 ½ 0 ½ ½ * 1.5/5 3.25


The 8th Tal Memorial takes place June 12-23, 2013 at the technology center Digital October in Moscow, Russia. The total prize fund is 100,000 EUR. The official website is providing live games, streaming video and commentary in Russian by GMs Alexander Grischuk, Peter Svidler, Sergey Rublevsky and Sergey Shipov. The games start each day at 15:00 local time which is 13:00 CET, 10:00 EDT and 07:00 PDT. The last round starts two hours earlier. Photos © Eteri Kublashvili courtesy of the Russian Chess Federation. Games via TWIC.

12417 reads 55 comments
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Comments


  • 14 months ago

    tripathi7

    Last 4 moves of Gelfand, WOW, looked like TAL himself playing

  • 14 months ago

    tripathi7

    oh anand, what happened to you

  • 14 months ago

    bachofchess

    I am starting to become a "Gelfand-fan" :)

  • 14 months ago

    Freydar

    I think Carlsen's latest win shows that, when he pulls himself together, he's world's number one chess player. After all, his rating can't be a coincidence. Lately, however, he has often seemed uninspired and bored with the whole thing. After having met Anand in November, no matter who wins or loses, I think he should take a break from chess for about a year or so. It'll do him good. He's still young and there's plenty of time left for him to bounce back afterwards.

  • 14 months ago

    Lawdoginator

    Carlsen looks great. 

  • 14 months ago

    IM DanielRensch

    Some game by Carlsen. He just makes things look *so easy* sometimes. It hurts my brain Tongue Out

  • 14 months ago

    yogiOK

    Wow, Gelfand definitely played like a Top 10 elite player of the world. He has been playing well the entire year, and has even climbed higher than he's ever been.

  • 14 months ago

    dandof

    Very easy and quick win for Magnus...

  • 14 months ago

    bigbikefan

    Anand will be eager to shed some blood tomorrow...  Andreikin, it's time to start snatching full points and winning the whole thing!

  • 14 months ago

    Vingore

    Incredibly brilliant game by Carlsen.  Truly the Mozart of chess!

  • 14 months ago

    albatrosses

    Carlsen beats Anand. A prelude to a new world champion!

  • 14 months ago

    sixtyfoursquares

    Vishy has given the taste of CARROT to Carlsen.

    Now let us await the taste of STICK in November!!

  • 14 months ago

    GeniusKJ

    Vishy will probably remain champion.

  • 14 months ago

    leonidp

    Gelfand reaches his highest ever rating (2765 on the live rating list) at age 44! Amazing!

  • 14 months ago

    TerryMills

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 14 months ago

    jocelasi

    I like the way how Carlsen anotated his game.  Straightforward.

  • 14 months ago

    Apsd1109

    Pick up the pace carlsen! we need you to win this!

  • 14 months ago

    lovinfeelin

    Vishy is playing mind games w/ Magnus. Letting him win the small battle @ then crushing him in the big one. I say Vishy retains title.

  • 14 months ago

    Tyozao

    Oh my God! we had plenty of good games. 

  • 14 months ago

    bolshevikhellraiser

    He was just giving Anand a taste of what's to come.

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