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Carlsen Defeats Caruana In Bilbao

  • SonofPearl
  • on 10/8/12, 12:15 PM.

The second half of the Chess Masters Final kicked off today in Bilbao with Fabiano Caruana holding a 4-point lead after the opening Sao Paulo leg a week ago.

Magnus Carlsen lost against Fabiano Caruana in the opening round in Sao Paulo, but he exacted revenge with the white pieces in round 6 today to make the tournament a real contest again. The Italian had his lead cut to just 2 points (using the 3-1-0 scoring system).

Elsewhere in the round, Sergey Karjakin drew with Lev Aronian, and Paco Vallejo Pons drew with Vishy Anand.

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The standings after 6 rounds (3-1-0 scoring)

# Name Fed Elo Pts
1 Caruana, Fabiano  ITA 2773 11
2 Carlsen, Magnus  NOR 2843 9
3 Aronian, Levon  ARM 2816 8
4 Anand, Viswanathan  IND 2780 6
5 Vallejo Pons, Francisco  ESP 2697 4
6 Karjakin, Sergey  RUS 2778 4


Fabiano Caruana lost his first game of the event

Sao Paulo 2012 Round 6 Magnus Carlsen Fabiano Caruana.jpg

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The Chess Masters Final is a 6-player double round-robin event which is held half in Sao Paulo, Brazil, and half in Bilbao, Spain.  The games in Bilbao start at 17:00 local time (15:00 UTC).

The tournament uses the "Sofia" anti-draw rules, meaning that players can only draw by mutual agreement with the permission of the arbiter. The "Bilbao" scoring system (3-1-0) is also in use.

The Bilbao schedule

07-Oct Opening
08-Oct Round 6
09-Oct Round 7
10-Oct Round 8
11-Oct Rest Day
12-Oct Round 9
13-Oct Round 10

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Games via TWIC. Photos from the official website.

10252 reads 70 comments
5 votes

Comments


  • 19 months ago

    ardiyono

    Smile

  • 24 months ago

    Tomcatsud

    Seriously !!! 20 moves ??

  • 24 months ago

    HyperDragon

    Just addressing the point about fatigue...

    The 'tactic' known as Cat and Mouse in endgames is very old and well known. The idea is you maybe have a slieght advantage but not enough to 'force' a win. So you will begin prodding your opponent. They way Carlsen played it was spectacular!
    He had a sleight advantage against Caruana after 27. Kxf3. In that position, he was the only one who could really play to win. His active king and rooks were good, but not quite enough to win on the spot. He recognized that he didn't have a forcing win, so he just started poking at Caruana. Caruana held up pretty well but eventually he cracked and conceded the point to Carlsen with 49. ... Bxf6?!

    This site gives a pretty good look at how to play Cat and Mouse endgames
    http://www.learn-and-play-online-chess.com/Lapoc_Chess_Board-cat-and-mouse-endgames.html

  • 24 months ago

    Mixologist

    "I'm not an advocate of the idea that there is a certain way in which you "ought to win." I know people often like to see "beauty," with lots of sacrifices and everything..."

    That mirrors the criticism Capablanca got from many of his contemporaries while he was the best in the world.  They said his chess was "simplistic" and "ugly".  The purpose of chess is, and always has been, to win.  The present position on the board determines whether or not "beautiful" tactics can be played for a winning advantage.  In many positions, such tactics are ineffective and the game must be won by grinding the opponent down until a single passed-pawn is all that remains to determine the winner.  Such games are not "pretty", but not any less valid for deciding who played better. 

    Also, endurance is a factor at this level because the games are much more positional.  The players understand their positions well enough to not be lured into a tactic that will cost them material, so there will be cases of "outrepeating" an opponent.  I notice at the GM level, a slight positional change by the opponent (often a pawn move) will prompt a GM to repeat a move, if they've calculated that the same move exploits a new weakness in the new position.

  • 24 months ago

    fabelhaft

    "I didn't address winning by fatigue"

    I don't think there is much to address. Just the idea that Carlsen's wins like the one against Caruana have nothing to do with chess understanding and knowledge, but just fatigue, is hard to take seriously.

  • 24 months ago

    Elubas

    I'm not an advocate of the idea that there is a certain way in which you "ought to win." I know people often like to see "beauty," with lots of sacrifices and everything, but my point of view is that such things are only truly beautiful if they were necessary to push forward your advantage. If you're just doing them for the sake of saying "look, I did it!" it just seems like a pointless spectacle to me, as if you stop caring about the accuracy of moves, you might as well praise any move you please (even 1 h4), whether it's good or not, as long as it is aesthetically pleasing to you. I mean, I could throw away all of my pieces (even if the position doesn't call for it) and consider myself a romantic, and tell my opponent who happily gobbles them up that he is ignorant of king safety or something, but he'll probably get the last laugh as he clobbers me.

    Sure, it would be cool if games were not won not based on checkmate but rather judging of who played better ("White ultimately got mated, but look at the beautiful queenside phalanx he built up! He clearly understands the game better than Black does!"), but of course that is silly, as the only objective thing in chess, after all, is the result! If it doesn't lead to eventual mate, that's all you need to determine whether a move is good or not, not an opinion about romanticism Smile

    I may have gone off on quite a tangent, there. I didn't address winning by fatigue, but again, I don't think it matters how you win as long as you do it. The pressure of having to do everything in one sitting is a big part of chess competition, something that separates it from Correspondence Chess for example. I'm sure, when we think about it, that all of us experienced tournament players know this.

  • 24 months ago

    lobosolo21

    Anand seems little tired,he's losing grip I think.

  • 24 months ago

    ClavierCavalier

    "I think the fact is that Carlsen is just a better player than all, because all in all, the end result is what matters, no matter how it is achieved :)"

    It'll be great if Carlsen loses this match and turns this into a contradictory statement.

  • 24 months ago

    yoam978

    I think the fact is that Carlsen is just a better player than all, because all in all, the end result is what matters, no matter how it is achieved :)

  • 24 months ago

    fabelhaft

    "Mag's opponent didn't demonstrate as superior knowledge in this endgame, however I have no doubts that if you gave the position to him prior to him playing a whole game he would have no problem in holding the draw. While I too am of the opinion that a mistake is necessary in order to lose a game of chess, I believe the winning side should draw that mistake out through superior calculation, knowledge, understanding etc., not fatigue"

    So Carlsen wins just because of the fatigue of the opponents, that's a new one.

  • 24 months ago

    fabelhaft

    "magnus is waiting for the opponent's mistakes, instead of playing chess thats what bareev says and i agree"

    If he can get these results without playing chess it's even more impressive.

  • 24 months ago

    RainbowRising

    It is true that Mag's opponent didn't demonstrate as superior knowledge in this endgame, however I have no doubts that if you gave the position to him prior to him playing a whole game he would have no problem in holding the draw.

    While I too am of the opinion that a mistake is necessary in order to lose a game of chess, I believe the winning side should draw that mistake out through superior calculation, knowledge, understanding etc., not fatigue. 

    On reflection, I suppose one could argue that a better understanding means that you are able to play these positions better when fatigued, so arguably they are one in the same. In addition, this phenomena of winning when your opponent(s) is(are) tired is not unique to chess, e.g. football.

  • 24 months ago

    Elubas

    "It seems to me that chess is becoming more about endurance than anything else. The strategy of the top players seems to be bore your opponent to death and wait for him to become tired and mess up. Truly awful."

    I like this quote, although I would replace "Truly awful" with "That's pretty cool." I have a lot of respect for not just Carlsen's endurance, but also his deep understanding of the endgame, which Caruana didn't demonstrate here to as high of a degree. It is really amazing that, even at the highest level, Carlsen is able to defy the wisdom of preparing in order to get a strong opening position against the opponent, showing that such is not in fact required to win the game.

    Trying to get your opponent to make a mistake before you is, last time I checked, the only way a chess game can be won, and Magnus is able to do it pretty well. What's especially nice is that, for how much he presses for the win (albeit in a fairly non-risky fashion), he rarely over-presses, a rare exception being his loss to Caruana earlier.

  • 24 months ago

    HyperDragon

    Carlson just beat Vallejo to tie for first place after Caruana drew with Karjakin!! :D

    This is going to be exciting :-)

  • 24 months ago

    snakehandler

    There's a word on the street that Aronian calculates even deeper than Magnus. These guys are starting to resemble supercomputers. They carry all tablebase solutions in their heads. Msagnificent

  • 24 months ago

    chess_cake

    It seems like Magus Carlen can calculate all the way to the end from the middle game.

  • 24 months ago

    razoman

    In an interview, Magnus said he can calculate up to 20 moves.

  • 24 months ago

    Tricklev

    Nick251359: Is there any link to that commant, or a place where I can find more information on it?

  • 24 months ago

    kiloNewton

    Good opening choice of Carlsen, 2.d3 against french!

  • 24 months ago

    irWietje

    On move 55 the game is a theoretical win, check the tablebases, Magnus has great technique, great game!

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