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Carlsen To Take Part In Next WCC Cycle

  • SonofPearl
  • on 10/13/11, 9:39 AM.

Following his dramatic blitz playoff victory in the Grand Slam Masters, Magnus Carlsen has given an interview to the mass-market Norwegian tabloid newspaper Verdens Gang in which he says he will participate in the next world championship cycle.

Magnus receives his winner's trophy in Bilbao

Carlsen Champion bilbao 2011.jpg

 

When Magnus Carlsen withdrew before the last Candidates event in Kazan which produced Boris Gelfand as a challenger to Vishy Anand, the reasons in his letter to FIDE included the "shallow ceaseless match-after-match concept", and he gave his opinion that "privileges should in general be abolished and a future World Championship model should be based on a fair fight between the best players in the World, on equal terms."

It seems that Carlsen is prepared to accept that the reigning champion keeps his privileges for now, as long as the promised round-robin tournament format for the next Candidates event materialises.

The eight players in the 2012 Candidates Tournament will be:

  • The loser of the Vishy Anand v Boris Gelfand world title match in 2012
  • The top 3 in the 2011 World Cup (Peter Svidler, Alexander Grischuk, Vassily Ivanchuk)
  • The top 3 rated players not otherwise qualified (average of July 2011 and Jan 2012 rating lists)
  • A nominee from the hosts (minimum 2700 Elo on the Jan 2012 list)

The top three rated players that look set to qualify are Magnus Carlsen, Lev Aronian, and either Vladimir Kramnik or Sergey Karjakin.

The rules and regulations for the 2011-2013 World Chess Championship Cycle can be found here.

 

Picture from the official website of the Grand Slam Masters

5499 reads 34 comments
4 votes

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    chessroboto

    Now that he has announced his intention, I hope to actually SEE him in the Candidates' Match for the 2014 WCC.

    Everyone has an opinion or a theory on why Magnus boycotted the last Candidates' cycle. I think Magnus thought it was fair to let the last WCC sweat it out to the next WCC cycle just as it is for recognized sports such as soccer and basketball.

    Carlsen probably also thought it was easier to take Anand out of the equation through the regular tournaments prior to the next Candidates' Matches given Vishy's performance outside of the WCC matches ever since 2007.

  • 3 years ago

    Aaronsky72

    Rorshach -  "About time......now we'll see if Carlsen is as great as his fans think he is.  Good luck to all the candidates."

    Wow, you've got a bug up your rear about Carlsen haven't you. Bottom line. He's the number 1 ranked player in the world for a reason, yes, he is the best, period. End of discussion.What's the matter, didn't your G-Star jeans fit you?

  • 3 years ago

    rubenshein

    There is some amount of wishful thinking in here. Why is it that so many think that the No.1 player in the world will not be ut to this task? ISn't that assumption a wee silly? (what's the concrete justification for it?)

    And it should be possible to allow for some principled thinking concerning Carlsen's initial withdrawal. There is no reason to think that he chickened out. But he did make a principal point. And I do understand his wish for a reform: let the per date best rated players meet each other on an equal standing, period. Chess is not about nostalgic tears. 

  • 3 years ago

    rorschach1985

    About time......now we'll see if Carlsen is as great as his fans think he is.  Good luck to all the candidates.

  • 3 years ago

    fabelhaft

    "That attention started while he was still a 2600 player (or before), so one cannot simply say that he deserves the attention since he is ranked #1 and 2800+"

    Many, Kasparov included, considered Carlsen to be unusually talented very early in his career and they turned out to be right. Then maybe he got some extra attention for being from a western country, it's unusual that players from the west reach great results, all participants in the Candidates got their chess education in Eastern Europe. If one would pick the 25-30 best players of the last 10-15 years Adams is the only western player that possibly could be included apart from Carlsen, and he was never anywhere close to the position Carlsen is in, I wonder if Adams ever won a strong tournament in his career.

  • 3 years ago

    simplysquare22

    very boring, who cares...

  • 3 years ago

    rpranga

    I hope Vishy & Carlsen world title match in 2014 will be great and intresting.  Best of luck both my Champions.

  • 3 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    yorugua:

    I don't hate Carlsen at all (I don't know him). I hate the overwhelming amount of attention he receives from the chess media compared to other players. "All Carlsen, all the time." That attention started while he was still a 2600 player (or before), so one cannot simply say that he deserves the attention since he is ranked #1 and 2800+. The attention he received since he appeared on the scene was ALWAYS way more than other players who achieved more than he did.

    I DO agree that it was wrong for FIDE to change the cycle after it started.

    I also believe (of course I cannot prove anything) that Carlsen didn't play because he was afraid of being knocked out, as Kramnik, Aronian, and Topalov were. I guarantee you, if one of those three players had won the Candidates cycle and not Gelfand, a LOT less people would have been complaining about the format.

  • 3 years ago

    yorugua

    Andre-Harding, your comment is ridiculous. Of course the changes FIDE made to the cycle after its start and the fact that Carlsen withdrew as a result decreased the validity of the title. 

    Imagine if the NBA when the playoffs are about to start decides that there are no more 3-pointers. If Dallas complains and withdraws, then the validity of the championship is decreased as a result. No question about it. 

    On another note, why do you hate Mganus so much? 

  • 3 years ago

    fabelhaft

    In the previous cycle Carlsen started playing according to the agreed rules that it would end with a Candidates match of eight games. FIDE changed the rules after Carlsen already had won the first qualifying event and replaced the Candidates match with a knockout where various players were invited without participating in the qualification. Many players disliked this, Adams and Carlsen withdrew from the qualification and Aronian wrote a very critical letter, urging FIDE to go back to the rules that had been agreed with the players when the qualification started.

    When Carlsen declined to play the knockout many were very critical of him, and the simplified version that was repeated over and over again was that Carlsen was a coward, that he knew that he wasn't good enough to win, that the minimatch knockout was much better than having the longer Candidates match Carlsen wanted etc.

    I found Carlsen's irritation with the rule changes quite understandable. Maybe he should have participated anyway, but minimatch knockouts really is the worst possible system and I agree with Carlsen that it would have been better not to change the rules halfway through the cycle. A longer Candidates match would have been preferable, and no free invitations to players that didn't want to participate in the qualification. One can agree or disagree with Carlsen's stand, but it's good to see that FIDE now moved away from the knockouts, where most of the games can be rapid or blitz. With a double round robin the whole cycle will become much more serious.

  • 3 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    By the way, Carlsen's presence or lack of presence will not make the cycle more or less "legitimate." If the Number 1 ranked player is given the chance to play, but chooses not to, whose fault is that? Not FIDE's fault, nor the fault of the other players who do choose to compete.

  • 3 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    I think Carlsen made the wrong decision last year to not play the Candidates. Why miss a chance to go for the World Championship? Well, anyway, FIDE gave him what he wanted in the end.

  • 3 years ago

    yorugua

    For all those who said Carlsen was wrong by standing up for himself and challenging FIDE, how do you like him now? :) This will definitely increase the validity of the World Ch title.

  • 3 years ago

    2pacinchess

    Carlsen may win the Candidate matches, but in my opinion both Aronian or Kramnik have better chances of winning.. Carlsen is a tournament player, new day new opponent.. I am not sure if he can survive a 12 game match against Anand.

  • 3 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    Carlsen should win the Candidates Tournament, but I won't be rooting for him. Let's be real here. There was nothing wrong with having elimination matches ('cept maybe the length). The reason a tournament format was preferred this time was so that Carlsen would have a better chance of winning, since he is the best tournament player in the world.

    ChessBase and the Western chess media are just dying to have Carlsen become World Champion. The next "Great Western Hope" to "save" chess from all the "Russians" (yeah, Ivanchuk, Gelfand, Radjabov, Ponomariov, Aronian...Russians...).

  • 3 years ago

    jesterville

    I just can't see Gelfand defeating Anand in Match play...although the current WCC is lacking in tournament results, he really prepares well for defending his crown.

    ...but I do see Magnus winning the next "Candidates", and facing Anand for the next WCC. This match I predict will be more watched than Kasparov vs Karpov...and high time that the world's top 2 players face off. 

  • 3 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    I wonder what the reaction will be when Carlsen plays and falls on his face? I can't wait to see that!! Oh the excuses!

    I am thinking more and more that drumdaddy is right and Gelfand will be the man wearing the crown Carlsen and others want. Boris is brilliant at preparing for big events.

  • 3 years ago

    pawngenius

    Hail Carlsen, future world champion!

     

  • 3 years ago

    arizona49

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago

    jesterville

    ...at last the boy has come to his senses...what has he accomplished by staying out of this year's Candidates? Zero.

    Anand vs Magnus will be great to watch in 2014.

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