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Carlsen Wins The 2012 Tal Memorial

  • SonofPearl
  • on 6/18/12, 10:19 AM.

After all the remarkable twists and turns of the 2012 Tal Memorial, it was the world #1 Magnus Carlsen who finished on a high, beating Luke McShane to win the tournament with a score of 5½/9.

In an incredibly close finale, if McShane had beaten Carlsen and the other results had remained the same, then the English amateur would have won the tournament!

The leader before the final round was Fabiano Caruana, but he fell to defeat against an inspired Lev Aronian, slipping down to second place.

The other games ended all-square, but not through lack of effort; especially from Vladimir Kramnik who tortured Alexander Morozevich for a long time before eventually conceding a draw after 72 moves.

The final standings in the 2012 Tal Memorial:

Name Elo 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Pts
Carlsen, Magnus 2835 * ½ 1 ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 ½
Caruana, Fabiano 2770 ½ * ½ 0 0 1 ½ ½ 1 1 5
Radjabov, Teimour 2784 0 ½ * ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ 1 1 5
Morozevich, Alexander 2769 ½ 1 ½ * 1 ½ 1 0 0 0
Aronian, Levon 2825 ½ 1 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 1 0 ½
Kramnik, Vladimir 2801 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ * 1 ½ 0 1
Grischuk, Alexander 2761 ½ ½ ½ 0 ½ 0 * 1 1 ½
Nakamura, Hikaru 2775 ½ ½ ½ 1 0 ½ 0 * ½ ½ 4
McShane, Luke 2706 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 ½ * ½ 4
Tomashevsky, Evgeny 2738 ½ 0 0 1 ½ 0 ½ ½ ½ *

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Magnus Carlsen was the only undefeated player, and took first place

Tal Mem 2012 Magnus Carlsen Winner.jpg

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Lev Aronian turned Fabiano Caruana's dreams of winning into a nightmare

Tal Mem 2012 Lev Aronian Round 9.jpg

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Teimour Radjabov claimed third place with a draw against Hikaru Nakamura

Tal Mem 2012 Teimour Radjabov Round 9.jpg

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Evgeny Tomashavsky finished last, despite a Tournament Performance Rating of over 2700!

Tal Mem 2012 Evgeny Tomashevsky Round 9.jpg

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Vladimir Kramnik finished with an even score...

Tal Mem 2012 Vladimir Kramnik Round 9.jpg

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...as did his final round opponent Alexander Morozevich

Tal Mem 2012 Alexander Morozevich Round 9.jpg

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Photos by Eteri Kublashvili.  Games via TWIC.

The official website has all the round-by-round videos available for replay here (Russian commentary) and also here (English commentary).

The tie-breaks were:

  1. Number of games played with black
  2. Number of wins
  3. Result of direct encounter
  4. Koya system
  5. Sonneborn-Berger

11449 reads 71 comments
9 votes

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    WalangAlam

    why are you arguing? Anand is great his accomplishments solid. With age comes the decline and so Anand is the past and Carlsen is the future. 

  • 2 years ago

    Aaronsky72

    BSDKcebu, Kasparov is the greatest ever period, put your political predjudice aside. Mulaton, Yes you can claim Carlsen is better, his ELO is higher, he was consistently better from an earlier age. I sense some serious anti-white, anti-West sentiment in some of the comments. 

  • 2 years ago

    fabelhaft

    The Candidates are certainly going to be tough, it's 50 years since the last round robin Candidates, and then 0.5 point separated the top three. Whoever had won would probably have beaten the 52-year-old Botvinnik. Fischer was three points from third place, but I'd still have expected him to win just as easily as Petrosian did in the match. Maybe it's something similar this time, and I'd have most of the participants in London as favourites against Anand. Except Gelfand, but I think he will finish last. Carlsen's winning chances should be below 50%, maybe it's something like: Carlsen 30%, Aronian 25%, Kramnik 15%, Radjabov 10%, Ivanchuk 10%, Grischuk 5%, Svidler 4%, Gelfand 1%.

  • 2 years ago

    gxtmfa

    While Smyslov and Korchnoi were quite old, they are also among the greatest chess players to ever live, one having a 18-19 w-l record in his 3 World Championship matches (Smyslov) and the other having challenged for the title twice and playing his eighth candidates match.

  • 2 years ago

    fabelhaft

    "the format for the cadidates tournament is different than regular tournament play. It's match-based. Magnus Carlsen is among the best when it comes to regular tournament play. But matches require a different mindset. Anand not only had to win the WC title by defeating Kramnik in a match, he successfully defended it twice"

    The format was a knockout but is now a double round robin, the same format in which Anand won the title he defended against Kramnik. As for minimatches as qualifiers I don't think they are good for much else than seeing to it that the best players don't reach the title match. When Kasimdzhanov won in 2004 he wasn't even top 50, and also Khalifman and Gelfand never won a top event with another format. It's just very unpredictable with all the blitz tiebreaks, and the draw that ensures that some players avoid the top ranked opponents.

    The Candidates being a double round robin definitely doesn't make it certain that Carlsen will succeed. Even if he usually wins the strongest tournaments he doesn't win every time, and the Candidates could well be one of those events where some other player does better. I think winning the Candidates will be more difficult than winning the title match. Kramnik failed in the Candidates but was given a title match anyway, and Anand won the title in a tournament in 2007.

    The last player to win a Candidates event in the cycle where he won the title was Kasparov. That was 30 years ago, and he faced Korchnoi and Smyslov (over 115 years old together) in the final Candidates matches. So winning Candidates plus title after playing several opponents ranked in the top five like Aronian, Kramnik, Radjabov etc isn't easy and hasn't been done in many decades, so Carlsen's chances shouldn't be overestimated in spite of his being the best player in the world the last years.

  • 2 years ago

    gxtmfa

    Elubus- I suppose you're right. And Carlsen did receive some coaching from Kasparov a year or two ago. For me, that was a sign that Carlsen was gunning for WC Champ. Even there were drastic differences between match and tournament play, having Kasparov's insight would definitely pay off for approaching match play (after, Kasparov has had some of the most memorable matches in chess history). 

    Maybe I'm just reluctant to embrace change. But I don't expect Anand to roll over, especially after this last match. I feel that he's going to face the next challenger with better preparation to make up for those questionnable moments in the Gelfand match.

  • 2 years ago

    Elubas

    gxtmfa, I think you are overestimating the difference between regular play and match play; it shouldn't be used as an infallible excuse, disregarding even the largest differences in rating (I'm mostly referring to how much higher rated Carlsen is than Anand). I get that the two things are different, but come on, chess is chess. Carlsen has for years been able to get more consistently good results than Anand, and I just don't think that the difference between regular and match play can make up for that; it probably doesn't change the fact that Carlsen probably makes better moves, on average, than Anand throughout his games.

    Maybe I'm ignorant about match play -- it's not like I'm an expert on it -- but I think it's enough that I simply have been watching a lot of big matches such as the WCC for the past few years. A lot of it is chess skill, a chunk of it is strong preparation, but all in all, I think Carlsen, if he was in Anand's position, with confidence in his chess ability, should be able to rise to the "challenge" of match play. It's not so much a challenge as it is an adjustment of routines (tournament play to match play).

  • 2 years ago

    chesstraveler

    Anand is one of the greatest of all time, but time has caught up with him. Now in his 40's, his peak has come and gone. Carlsen is half Anand's age, hasn't begun to reach his peak, and already has a rating considerably higher than Anand's (Anand's currently being in decline) at the Super Grandmaster level. Not only that, does anyone really believe that if Carlsen were to play a 12 game match today with Gelfand (another player in his 40's) that it would have to go into overtime for Carlsen to win? Carlsen will be the next World Chess Champion.

  • 2 years ago

    gxtmfa

    1. Kasparov is a crazy politician, but he has the wherewithall to be jailed for his beliefs. Moreover, he grew up in Azerbaijan during the Soviet Regime and still stood up for his beliefs. 

    2. Ain't no one more moody than Fischer. That guy was insane. 

    3. I'll concede Anand at his best is a juggernaut, and I'm not sure if I can imagine many beating him in tournament play. 

  • 2 years ago

    BSDKcebu

    I see Magnus won't become a world champion.. the facts are fighting against the myths.. it's just a feeling.  He's too moody more than Bobby Fischer.  I still have my banks on Anand, i think Anand is the greatest.. Kasparov? wow the guy is crazy potician.

  • 2 years ago

    gxtmfa

    I'll reiterate despite redundancy: the format for the cadidates tournament is different than regular tournament play. It's match-based. Magnus Carlsen is among the best when it comes to regular tournament play. But matches require a different mindset. Anand not only had to win the WC title by defeating Kramnik in a match, he successfully defended it twice. nand might not shine as much in regukar tournament play, but he is very powerful in matches. Each have their own strengths and weaknesses. In a regular tournament, I'd put my money on Carlsen. In accelerated time controls and extended matches, I'd put my money on Anand.

  • 2 years ago

    Mulaton

    gxtmfa the title was defended against who?? not only carlsen but there are a lot of players stronger that the last challenger, anand has a winning score against magnus but not in recent tournaments

  • 2 years ago

    fabelhaft

    "winning the last game playing the black piece is phenomenal!"

    It's becoming a habit for Carlsen in the Tal Memorial, he won with black in the last round also in his two previous starts, against Nakamura when he won in 2011 and against Leko when he finished in second place in 2009, as with McShane the only times he has beaten these opponents with black.

  • 2 years ago

    fabelhaft

    "Stop doing the chess media hype while stroking his ego and return him to nomal as a human being. He plays good chess but until he captures the world chess title and wins the candidates match to represent "he has nothing to write home about.""

    Every time Carlsen scores another great result people keep repeating that he is lucky, overrated, hyped, and has "nothing to write home about".

  • 2 years ago

    novzki41

    carlsen is impressive and winning the last game playing the black piece is phenomenal!

    he needs to join the next candidates matches and challenge WCC Anand for the title while he is in his prime...

  • 2 years ago

    gxtmfa

    Mulaton, you actually can. The WC title is won in match play, which is quite different from tournies. You can't say Carlsen is better just because of elo. 

  • 2 years ago

    Mulaton

    sorry my friend but you cant say that anand is better than carseln just because he holds a world title.

  • 2 years ago

    Mulaton

    lol funny drumdaddy!!! so that he is not a real good player now??

  • 2 years ago

    drumdaddy

    This Carlsen kid is going to be a real good player some day.

  • 2 years ago

    mobidi

    Yes ! Magnus is almost strong (positional player)-but ...his opponents helps him to win.Boys...Embarassed

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