Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Danny Saves Chess.com from Day 1 Sweep!

  • ChessMarkstheSpot
  • on 6/4/11, 9:51 PM.

   After a full day of chess for our favorite Chess.com IMs Danny Rensch and David Pruess, day one of the Chess.com GM Challenge goes to the GMs, but not without a fight.

   Taking place over the weekend at the Shelby School in Arizona with its legendary American chess scholastic team, of which Danny is a product, our "resident" IMs and favorite Chess.com/TV Hosts can go to bed tonight knowing they struck a blow, albeit a small one, against their GM counterparts.

   Facing GMs Alex Yermolinsky and Suat Atalik  in any fashion is pretty intimidating, but in a Double Scheveningen style match, meaning David and Danny play each GM with each color, just makes it more interesting. Cool

   Here are the pictures of the participating GMs:(Yermolinksy on top, Atalik below)

 

yermo.jpg

 

atalik.jpg

 

   With the action being relayed from Arizona to our Live Chess Analysis boards thanks to BuddyT, the audience was treated to some awesome games with some awesome tactics, and tomorrow's final two games promise more of the same.

   The time controls are 40 moves in 90 Minutes and a 30-second increment throughout the game with a 30-minute addition at move 40, making the games very exciting and up tempo, which they most definitely were.  Cool

   Round 1 took place this morning at 10 AM Pacific/1 PM Eastern on the Live Chess Analysis boards and Danny and David drew Black, a problem right off the bat, especially against GMs of this caliber. The games were official as they were USCF rated.

   David's game against Alex Yermolinsky was the first one to finish in Round 1, and as you will see from the game below, it wasn't a very pretty sight, as "Yermo" was beastly with his attacking. The game started out with a Queen's Indian with the sidelines of 4. g3.

 

 

   Danny's game against Atalik didn't go much better, but did go a little longer after an Open Catalan. Atalik spent a very long time in think mode after Black's 11...Nd7. And Danny would do the same before he played 16...d4.

 

 

   So after the first round, the GMs were each up a point. The games finished up at around 4:30 PM Eastern time, giving the players a little under two-and-a-half hours to prepare for Round 2, which started at 7 PM Eastern.

   The players switched partners and colors as now Danny and David had White. There was some conversation in the chat, especially with me and ChristianSoldier007, as to what openings would be played by Danny and David. David, we just knew, would go his favorite KG as he faced Atalik. But Danny, knowing that he is big on the Nimzo, was pretty close to a sure thing, at least it was for me. The problem was Yermo and Atalik play pretty much everything, so it's hard to prepare for, even as White.

   Once again, David's game finished first, and with his trusted King's Gambit (KGA: Muzio Gambit) in tow, we were pretty confident that he was ready to play. Sadly though, it didn't turn out the way we had hoped but it was an awesome game as the PGN below will show:

 

 

   The one problem showing the games this way is that you don't see the times on the clocks before, during, and after each move. David spent an enormous amount of time after the 13th move-set and was down almost an hour before playing 13.Nd5. At that time, he was under 15 minutes on his clock. After 21. Bb5+, he had less than 9 minutes while Atalik had nearly an hour. It was a great game nonetheless and he got a great cheer when he came into the room afterwards. The discussion in the room during his game was incredible. I just wished I would've logged it to give you some idea of the awesomeness that went on.

   Now, it's Danny's turn. Going up against Yermo in a Caro-Kann Advance Variation, Danny held the bishop pair but at the cost of both of his knights as the game began to develop even deeper. By move 30, both Queens were off the board, Danny had doubled rooks on the e-file, and once again, the discussion in the room was just incredible.

 

 

   Here are the scoring tables for each match: (the number colors represent what color the player had with his respective result)

 

Player G1 G2 Total
Danny Rensch 0 0
Suat Atalik 1 1

 

Player G1 G2 Total
Danny Rensch 1 1
Alex Yermolinsky 0 0

 

Player G1 G2 Total
David Pruess 0 0
Alex Yermolinsky 1 1

 

Player G1 G2 Total
David Pruess 0 0
Suat Atalik 1 1

 

   These were some fascinating games and tomorrow's final two rounds again starting at 10 AM Pacific/1 PM Eastern/6 PM London and 4 PM Pacific/7 PM Eastern/Midnight London, promise to be even more thrilling. Just go to LIVE Chess and check the "EVENTS" tab at the above times and enjoy the show everyone. The Analysis boards are open to ALL members!  Cool  To find out more about this event, check out my blog entry with more details on it.

   I hope to see you all there!

  -Mark

3504 reads 19 comments
4 votes

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    restinpeace

    awwww pruess didn't win, dang

  • 4 years ago

    IM dpruess

    when white plays g3 you know his bishop will probably go to g2. so black plays ba6 to use the bishop on the diagonal the f1 bishop will be leaving. also it attacks the c4-pawn. white has to do something slightly inconvenient to defend the pawn.

  • 4 years ago

    merchco

    Ok i am not strong enough to comment on the chess but i do think catching your opponent of guard is how many wars were won through out history so maybe the trick is to let everyone prepare for you on your regular opening but have a different equally as well prepared that no one knows about and only use it when playing considerably stronger players

    Also whats the idea behind 4 ba6 does it not put the rook under considerable pressure using up valuable time and moves in trying to protect it.

    It just seems to go against theory  just looks to be so wrong and what does it do for whites causes as it seems to defend nothing nor attack nothing it just seems a really bad move

  • 4 years ago

    StevenBearKing

    That is what I am talking about Papa Bear. Ride that momentom to victory! Break a leg.

  • 4 years ago

    Matthew_eh

    no excuses pruess ^^^

  • 4 years ago

    mobidi

    @dpruess Yes -this idea is interesting,but maybe 8.o-o-o was bad-interesting was-8.Bb5! Bd7 9.Bc6! Bc6 10.d5 Bd7 11. e5!(simply the best!)Qh4 12.g3 Bg4 13.Qd3 Qe7 14. 0-0! 0-0-0 15.ed cd 16 Rae1 Qd7 17.Qd4!!!-centralization a la Nimzowitsch...Good Luck! (with your new variation).

  • 4 years ago

    ccube1979

    from what i know fischer never lost using KG, so there must be something in this openning that is worht checking

    KG against a stronger oponnent is like playing with fire, but given the circumstance(a must win) it's worth it

    i agree, the earlly bishop sacrifice against a stronger opennent in a regular time control is suicide

  • 4 years ago

    IM dpruess

    well, i'd won every tournament game i'd played with this variation in the past, including against an im and a gm. this time he was well-prepared because it's a closed tournament, and played out a bunch of challenging moves quickly, and i got into bad time trouble. that happens. if you play an interesting opening in chess, if your opponent has prepared with a computer you are in big trouble. and then of course, Suat is a much stronger player than I.

  • 4 years ago

    dcremisi

    nice article

  • 4 years ago

    Aurel

    thanks for the great article !

    .. this Event is really cool :)

  • 4 years ago

    _valentin_

    mobidi:  I agree.  This is essentially the point I was trying to make.

  • 4 years ago

    mobidi

    @valentin and SonofPearl This version of KING's gambit is good only in BULLET games!

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    Or, maybe David just played into his own strength, and the GM proved to be even stronger. 

  • 4 years ago

    _valentin_

    SonofPearl:  The strategy you point at is certainly sensible, and I don't dispute that. The difference I see is in the level of risk involved and the strengths of the opponent.  Specifically:

    - King's Gambit takes on what I consider (though David may disagree) unnecessarily high risk for white very early on with the hope that black will slip, while there are many other openings starting with 1.e4 that have sharp lines.  After all, if King's Gambit was so good and sharp, it would be employed much more widely at the strong GM level, but we know it isn't; it only serves as the occasional surprise, but never a staple opening of these players.  For a reason...  Unlike, say, the Sicilian Defense, or the Meran variation (after 1.d4), which can be very sharp...

    - Karpov's (and many other strong GM players') strategy has been to play into the weaknesses of the opponent.  If that means a tactical game, so be it.  But this isn't always the case -- some people are weaker at openings (and specific openings), others at tactics in complex positions, others at endgames, others at playing under time pressure, etc.  David's pre-game preparation must have identified what Atalik tends to be weakest at, relatively speaking.  If that's tactical interchange, then his decision for King's Gambit may be better founded.

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    Woo Hoo!  Danny beat Yermo!  Cool  

  • 4 years ago

    SonofPearl

    Great report Mark! Cool

    @ valentin - I see your point, but isn't playing sharp positions supposed to be the best way to try to beat a stronger player?

    According to GM Gregory Sherper in his recent article, you should "play the sharpest chess you can and...the best openings you know".  I think David stayed true to that! Smile

  • 4 years ago

    mobidi

    @ IM dpruess.To catch The Bishop ? Better was to exchange HIM ! (12. or 13.!!! ...Nf4)-and Your  position is  BETTER (because of 2! BISHOPS)-Steinitz is forever YOUNG!

  • 4 years ago

    _valentin_

    Playing the King's Gambit with an early piece sacrifice (n.b. there are other variations not involving as much risk) against a stronger player, with lots of time on the clock (classical time control), and an opponent who is well-prepared for this opening (hence no surprise effect) because everyone knows David is a King's Gambit fan -- this all seems to me like asking for trouble...  It takes courage for white, but it wasn't clear what David was hoping for in that game, since the opening line was well-known for the first 10 moves or so, and then we saw no strong novelty introduced...

    The analysis by WanderingWinder is helpful in shedding some additional light on potentially better alternatives, but in any case it seems like white is on the back foot by their own choice from the very start of the game.  Could work against weaker players or with less time, but this wasn't the case.  Sorry, I am being pragmatic here.

  • 4 years ago

    IM dpruess

    Nice report, Mark!

    here's some analysis of the pruess-atalik game by WanderingWinder, incorporating the live game-time chat discussion:

    http://blog.chess.com/WanderingWinder/chesscom-gm-challenge---round-2

    i found it pretty interesting.

Back to Top

Post your reply: