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Deadlock Continues In Moscow

  • SonofPearl
  • on 5/18/12, 8:35 AM.

The 12-game world chess championship match between Vishy Anand and Boris Gelfand in Moscow has now reached the halfway point without a decisive game.

The game was another Slav, and this time Gelfand varied from his earlier attempts with 6.Qc2, but a well prepared Anand achieved equality without any difficulty.

Another rest day is scheduled for tomorrow, so the second half of the match begins with game 7 on Sunday 20 May, when Anand will again have the black pieces.

Name  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Pts
Vishy Anand ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . . 3
Boris Gelfand ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ ½ . . . . . . 3

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Garry Kasparov visited the event today and gave a press conference for the world's media.  The former world chess champion also made a surprise guest appearance in the commentary room..

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Garry Kasparov holds court at the press conference...

Garry Kasparov 2012 WCC by Alexey Yushenkov 4.jpg

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...and with Peter Svidler (right) in the commentary room

WCC Anand v Gelfand game 6 Peter Svidler Garry Kasparov.jpg

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The video of the day's action, with the comments of Peter Svidler and Garry Kasparov on the game and other chess-related matters is available for replay at the official website.


All games start at 15:00 local time (11:00 UTC).  The time control is 120 minutes for the first 40 moves, then 60 minutes for the next 20 moves, and a final 15 minutes to a finish with a 30 seconds increment after move 61.

The prize fund is $2.55 million, with the winner receiving $1.53 million (60%), the loser $1.02 million (40%).

If the match is level after 12 games there will be a 4-game rapid match tie-break at 25 minutes per game plus 10 second increment. If scores are still level a 2-game blitz match will be played at 5 minutes plus 3 second increment.  If the deadlock is still not broken, there can be up to 5 of the these 2-game blitz matches before a sudden-death blitz game will decide the winner (5 minutes for white, 4 minutes for black, and a 3 second increment from move 61).

The full rules for the match can be found here (pdf).

The match schedule is below (times are Moscow time = UTC+4 hours):

Date Event Time Date Event Time
11-May Game  1  15:00 21-May Game  8  15:00
12-May Game  2  15:00 22-May Rest day   
13-May Rest day    23-May Game  9  15:00
14-May Game  3  15:00 24-May Game  10  15:00
15-May Game  4  15:00 25-May Rest day   
16-May Rest day    26-May Game  11  15:00
17-May Game  5  15:00 27-May Rest day   
18-May Game  6  15:00 28-May Game  12  15:00
19-May Rest day    29-May Rest day   
20-May Game  7  15:00 30-May Tie break  12:00

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The official match website has video commentary in Russian and English.  The English language host is Dirk Jan ten Geuzendam, who will be joined by Nigel Short (on 11–12 May), Jan Timman (14–15 May), Joel Lautier (17 May), Peter Svidler (18, 23–24 and 28 May), Peter Leko (20–21 May), and Vladimir Kramnik (26 May).

Kasparov picture by Alexey Yushenkov at the official match website.

6002 reads 39 comments
3 votes

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    TheMagicianPaul

    Gelfand won! All hail the new World Champion!!

  • 3 years ago

    Chesspanzer

    Vishy looks lost ;o

  • 3 years ago

    Sahasrara

    @sooth you should see the interview that Kasparov gives, he explains why the players are playing the way they are. 

  • 3 years ago

    soothsayer8

    davidmelbourne, I understand that--perfect play will result in a draw, and these guys are as close as it gets to perfect, but how many of these games have even reached the 40th move? Most of these draws have been in less than 30 moves: 1. d4 d5, then trade, trade, trade, trade until there are a few pieces left and neither side has made any headway. Again, a trickier opening would be in Anand's favor, this is how he beat Topalov and Kramnik, with openings such as the Meran and Catalan.

  • 3 years ago

    soothsayer8

    I think this stalemate chess will ultimately be in Gelfand's favor, this, you'll remember, was how he won the candidates match, drawing every single game until the one that really matters. Anand should be more agressive. Not reckless, but playing to win. If he did that, Gelfand would already be on the ropes. Anand is the stronger player in this match and he should play like it. And I agree with drumdaddy, I'm having much more fun following the US Championships ;)

  • 3 years ago

    The_Seventh_First

    Carlson verses Nakamura for the World Championships in 2013/14...Anand and Gelfand are boring chess players albeit GREAT but extremely tentative and that is so annoying.  With a 60/40 split and World Champion title on the line where is the passion or the desire to win?  A draw is playing to kings...PERIOD

  • 3 years ago

    angad93

    What time are the matches eastern standard time? 

  • 3 years ago

    davidmelbourne

    The reality of chess is if one person makes 40 good moves, and his opponent makes 40 good moves, then the result will always be a draw.

    When you have two chess geniuses, each with 30 years experience and knowledge of the game, a decisive result will always be the exception. This is even more the case when they are following as thier first rule: don't lose a game. 

    Topolav lost against Anand becuase he feared the Rapids so much that he played recklessly in the final game. Gelfand has no such fears and will continue to avoid losing, first, rather than playing risky chess.Anand is naturally cautious, relying on inaccuracies of others, rather than trying to push his opponents into complexity, and so error. Thus, the present course of the match is the one we should expect. 

    Gelfand is gaining a psychological edge, given his underdog status. I also feel he is more motivated than Anand, who has been WC for many years now and is, according to commentators, thinking hard about retiring. 

    That said, there will be a winner and, as each game passes, the tension builds....

  • 3 years ago

    Mike-StCath

    ClavierClavalier...I agree with you 100% about the blitz chess...right on!!!

  • 3 years ago

    ClavierCavalier

    I like the idea of a 1 on 1 match, especially since they have tournaments to decided who will face the champion.  I think this blitz chess stuff to break ties is a little stupid.  Most people say things like "Blitz is fun, but it's not really chess," and "Analyzing blitz is a waste."  I also feel like the younger, (physically) faster player will have a bit of an edge in blitz.

  • 3 years ago

    rodrigoponteras

    Laughing

  • 3 years ago

    leibo

    The format itself - 2 candidates only - is the problem. No offense to Gelfand, but does it make any sense that he is the only one contending for the title? He's not even in the top 15 rated players in the world today! So you have all these higher-rated players left out, including some up-and-coming geniuses, talented, brilliant, and exciting to watch - and they're nowhere to be seen. So you expect this to be interesting?! 

    What they need to do is change the whole format by having the top 20 players in the world play each other in many rounds - and from that Swiss-style tournament will emerge the next world champion. Chess is not NBA or MLB where you will always have exciting championship series; in chess, the only way to keep it exciting is to transform this championship into a tournament, and have a group of the best players in the world fighting each other, with all the tumultuous drama that will ensue! 

  • 3 years ago

    WestofHollywood

    20-24 classical games. If match tied champion keeps championship. No blitz chess. What is so bad about that?

  • 3 years ago

    chapablanca2000

    @Bamaknight: Black is going to play ...Rfd8, trade off the rook on d5, and White is still left with his undeveloped rook and bishop, which will be hard to bring out. It's very uncomfortable for White, even though he's a pawn up. One line is 18. Qd3 Rfd8 19. g3 (what else? 19. Bd2? Rxd5 20. Qxd5 Rd8; 19. b3? Rxd5 20.Qxd5 Rd8 21. Qf3 Qf6 21. Rb1 Qxf3 22. gf Rd1+ 23. Kg2 Ba3)19...Bb6!? (black has a choice of ways to continue) 20. e4 (20. Qb3 prevents the rook from invading on c2, but then how is white going to develop after 20..Rd8?) 20...Rc2, and Black is definitely better.  In any case, White is groveling for a mere pawn, and Gelfand preferred to finish his development rather than defend passively.

    Just doesn't seem fair, though: White saddles black with the weak isolated pawn, and Black just sort of shrugs and readily gives it up, knowing that losing the pawn won't actually give him a disadvantage.  

  • 3 years ago

    chessrook1234

    Glefond needs to get his act together. if anand wins one now, glefond cant catch him ever

  • 3 years ago

    Fantasto

    IMHO rapid and blitz games are no way to determine the world championship. A bit like 20 / 20 versus test match cricket!

  • 3 years ago

    WestofHollywood

    This match reminds me somewhat of Lasker-Schlechter. I really believe you need at least 20 classical games to decide a world championship. I miss the old days of 24 game matches. I guess I'm a dinasour.

  • 3 years ago

    Bjarkoff

    @swineking hahaha

  • 3 years ago

    hydroheal

    +1000 to @chessdoggblack comment.. I:)

  • 3 years ago

    JoeTheV

    When will Gelfand win a game?

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