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High Excitement In London

  • SonofPearl
  • on 12/8/10, 2:08 PM.

The first round of the London Chess Classic lived up to expectations, with all games producing high drama in very different ways.

The biggest upset was the surprise victory by Luke McShane against Magnus Carlsen.  McShane took advantage of an uncharacteristic slip from the Norwegian to bring home the full point in fine style.

Luke wins against Magnus.  The force is strong with this one...

McShane_Carlsen_Rd1.jpg

 

Nigel Short fared less well with the white pieces against Vladimir Kramnik.  Short deliberately avoided heavy opening theory, but soon found himself with an inferior position.  Kramnik didn't need to be asked twice, and crashed through the centre with his pawns to take victory.

The highest rated of the English players, Michael Adams, had a very nice win against the lowest rated, David Howell.  A fluent attack ended the game, and Howell was generous enough to let him complete the final checkmate in mid-board.

Hey Mickey! You're so fine! England's #1 had a winning start in round one

Adams_Rd1.jpg

 

For a long time it looked for all the world that all the first round games would end decisively.  World Champion Vishy Anand had squeezed Hikaru Nakamura until none of the commentators gave the American any chance of saving the game.  Yet somehow, against the odds, Nakamura found a way to keep the champion out and earn a vital draw with the black pieces.

Back to the wall: Nakamura hangs on to shut-out the champ

Nakamura_Rd1.jpg

 

Round 2 games start 2 hours later tomorrow, at 16:00 local time (GMT) Look out for more live coverage on Chess.com, and at the excellent official site.

All pictures courtesy of Ray Morris-Hill.

 

 

 

13760 reads 54 comments
4 votes

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    mtguy8787

    PayprPlayn, Deep Fritz 12 scores bxc6 as its number 1 choice at a depth of 21

  • 4 years ago

    soothsayer8

    Wow, what a victory by this McShane guy, he must feel pretty good about himself about now ;)

    But at least Nakamura held on for a draw against the World Champ as black, that's an accomplishment in and of itself I'd have to say. Go Hikaru! =)

  • 4 years ago

    Ericbryan

    NO!! My two of my favourite GMs lost their games ( Magnus and Nigel) it's not a really good start but atleast Viswanathan got a draw.

  • 4 years ago

    Kolovrat

    I see what you mean, however, I believe he loses a pawn in the exchange, and personally his position does not improve whatsoever from the exchange.

  • 4 years ago

    rorschach1985

    Just who is Luke McShane and what business does he have being 2-0 after the first two rounds.  Seriously though, if he keeps this up then he is definitely a force to be reckoned with in this tournement and beyond.

  • 4 years ago

    payprplayn

    As my addendum to my previous comment mentioned, I figured out 19.bxc6, however, I don't see why black's only response should be Qxc6.  I think it would be more likely that black would simply move his queen off of the b-file, alowing white to play cxd7.  Black would then recapture on d7, probably with the bishop.  Nf6+ is no good now, because white would be giving up a night and a bishop for the rook.  At least that's my (extremely primitive) analysis.  feel free (encouraged, in fact) to point out why I'm wrong.

  • 4 years ago

    Kolovrat

    payprplayn I think it is because if Carlsen 18...bxc6?, McShane can also follow with bxc6, which is a threat, to which Carlsen could only respond with Qxc6, however then McShane would Nf6, which is a full on fork on Queen and King, game over. Try using the analysis board, you will see what I mean.

  • 4 years ago

    payprplayn

    I'm a terrible chess player, and never really understand the moves great players make.  I wonder, though, if someone more enlightened (and/or more Rybka-equipped) than I could explain to me why Carlsen doesn't play 18...bxc6?  I see a couple of discovered attacks (along the b-file and the long white diagonal) but no line I come up with gives black less than two minor pieces for a rook.  I'm sure there's probably a simple reason it would be horrible for black, but I don't see it. Can someone help me out?  What am I missing?  

     

    EDIT>> Ooh, i think I get it.  19.bxc6, then black has to move his queen (not sure where to, but he can't take the c6 pawn because of Nf6+), then 20. cxd7.  Is that right?

  • 4 years ago

    Kolovrat

    Carlsen bounces back and defeats Adams, but McShane has won again against Short, next round will be most intersting as McShane is tested against the veteran Kramnik.

  • 4 years ago

    leo5

    Carlsen is still perhaps the best in the world. McShane played a good attacking game. Why does everyone turn against the champion as soon as he loses one game? Show your loyalty :)

  • 4 years ago

    rockettorque

    Is is just me or did it look like Carlsen was playing defensive the entire game. I got the impression that he had no real plan, merely replying to the white threats. I couldn't find a single move that smacked of counter attack. As it has previously been mentioned, he's been inconsistent of lately. Perhaps he needs to refocus his priorities.

  • 4 years ago

    rockettorque

    I haven't seen so many bums wearing well cut suits ever. Come to think of it, I haven't seen such clean skins bums either. Maybe Thefairman lives in a more utopian society than I, but here, the homeless have a different look. Perhaps you were speaking about the carefully disheveled hairdos?

  • 4 years ago

    glennlmagnase

    i have no comment for win of mcshane using c4 is the key for winning for him, MC For magnus carlsen shane for shane mosley, watch for pacquiao vs. mosley nextyear its a great fight.

  • 4 years ago

    MWAISUMBE

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 4 years ago

    DmitriNet

    >>Somebody help me out here, I believe I see a mistake within Short vs. Kramnik's >>game.Move 36, Short takes the Rook on the h-file. He then is up materially.

     

    Black would play then Qf3+ and Rg4 with a clear win

  • 4 years ago

    2pacinchess

    Wow Carlsen really sucks. I don't understand why everyone likes him so much, I think that Anand or Kramnik are going to win this tournament.

  • 4 years ago

    placidopenitente2

    hello natalia!

  • 4 years ago

    msmv10

    Molekshine of Spain is in much favour of Carlsen, but that does not mean that each time and with everyone Carlsn will win. It must be praisewothy that a lo rated GM has beaten him. Don't count own mathematics that out of 100, McShine can win only 15. Supose if he wins 99 games, then ....????? 

  • 4 years ago

    Moleskine

    With a difference of 157 rating points (Carlsen-McShane) the odds are 71% to 29%. Sure, it's uncommon to witness a Carlsen's loss, but as an upset it's quite probable. Let them play 9 more games in a row and McShane would win at least 2 more.

    Btw, all the games are higly enjoyable, aren't they?

     

    Just for the record: a 2500 GM against Carlsen will be winning just 15 games out of 100. Mere mortals, even strong amateurs (2100, 2000+) can expect no mercy: Nordic triumph 100% granted!

  • 4 years ago

    mishanp

    GM Sergey Shipov's live commentary on Anand-Nakamura is now here: http://www.chessintranslation.com/2010/12/shipovs-live-commentary-on-the-london-classic-rd-1/

    It's an entertaining and instructive account of the "least interesting" game of the day!

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