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Ilyumzhinov Extends Contract Deadline for World Championship | Update

  • PeterDoggers
  • on 8/29/14, 12:02 PM.

FIDE President Kirsan Ilyumzhinov has extended the deadline for the players' contracts for the world championship match between Magnus Carlsen and Viswanathan Anand until September 7, 2014.

This was mentioned on Facebook by GM Emil Sutovsky, the president of the Association of Chess Professionals (ACP).

Carlsen had requested to postpone his decision to sign the match contract or not until after the Sinquefield Cup, which ends on September 7.

Only two days ago, FIDE Vice President Israel Gelfer told Chess.com: “The deadline is August 31, 2014. A signature on September 1 or 2 is tolerable, but we cannot wait longer.” 

But today, Sutovsky posted "breaking news" on the ACP's Facebook page:

Yours truly just had a very constructive and fruitful conversation with FIDE President, Mr. Kirsan Ilyumzhinov. After hearing all the arguments, FIDE President has accepted my proposal to approve Carlsen's request, and agreed to extend the deadline for signing the contract till September 7. 

Gens una sumus again?”

Sutovsky spoke with Carlsen's manager Espen Agdestein earlier today, and then spoke with the FIDE president on the phone. 

“I find this possibility to speak to the FIDE president very important,“ said Sutovsky. “I wasn't excited by how the world championship and Olympiad commission treated this issue. Then I wrote an open letter, but as things didn't change, I found no other option than to call Kirsan.”

Emil Sutovsky | Photo © David Llada.

“I told him that it cannot be that the world's strongest player can be forfeited for this deadline," said Sutovsky. "He said that every day the deadline is extended, it is harder to organize the match. It was a friendly conversation.”

The FIDE President and Sutovsky eventually agreed on a new deadline: September 7, right after the end of the Sinquefield Cup.

Sutovsky: “This doesn't ensure the contract will be signed, but it was important to give them some time.”

Right after the phone call, Ilyumzhinov signed a formal letter and sent it to Sutovsky, who forwarded it to Carlsen's manager.

“Agdestein replied that he had received it. He will contact me later,” said Sutovsky.

Anand and Carlsen at the 2013 world championship match in Chennai, India (via Chess.com).

Carlsen's opponent in the match, Viswanathan Anand, has already signed the contract. If Carlsen decides not to sign it, Anand may end up playing Sergey Karjakin, who finished second at the 2014 Candidates’ Tournament.

The match between Carlsen and Anand is scheduled to be held November 7-28, 2014 in Sochi, Russia. The prize fund is about U.S. $1.5 million.


Update: Carlsen's manager Agdestein told VG that the 7 September date is “not very helpful” as now “[Magnus] has to think about this the whole tournament.” Agdestein also stated that they had in fact asked for 17 September. 


10316 reads 61 comments
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Comments


  • 4 months ago

    cavelorum

    @The_Jeh, the next time you decide to spread your political agenda I would suggest you to stick to the facts and not use your vivid imagination. There's no law, neither Norwegian nor European, that forbids Carlsen to travel, play and receive any prize money.

    If you want to talk politics, please, leave chess alone and go somewhere else. Thank you very much.

  • 4 months ago

    savantz

    surely you joke...

    anand help carlsen?

  • 4 months ago

    Fontanellean

    Savantz, if Anand is denied his rematch with Carlsen, he has no one to blame but himself. Signing the contract was profoundly irresponsible of him, but apparently Anand subscribes to India's good relations with Russia. What Anand should have done is partnered with Carlsen to pressure FIDE for a less controversial venue.

  • 4 months ago

    savantz

    yes it is...

    SIGN and PLAY

  • 4 months ago

    Fontanellean

    Let's examine Carlsen's two options:

    A. Play in a crappy venue dripping with the influence of crooked Putin supporters, unable to accept any prize money without breaking a Norwegian law that recognizes EU sanctions against the event's sponsors, and possibly violating future sporting sanctions against Russia.

    B. Tell a corrupt FIDE to shove it.

    I think the choice is morally clear. 

  • 4 months ago

    aspergr

    @TeleTwister "It's unbelievable that FIDE couldn't get a bid on the most marketable world champion since Bobby Fischer and had to resort to a last minute match with half the prize fund."

    Really? If we consider that the match is a repeat of the last one+for the first time just a year since the last match, I'm not sure it would have been easy to get a bigger prize fund, and it's not really a last minute match.

    Also, I doubt the Norwegian Carlsen is as marketable as the American Fischer (for purely demographic reasons+no cold war context+intellectual stuff like chess having less attraction).

    Basically, Anand has signed, and I think quite a few people think that Carlsen's arguments for not signing don't weigh enough to refuse Anand this match. And as has been pointed out, Carlsen actually wanted the crown to be disputed more often, so if he indeed ends up refusing this match, it will look kind of political and disrespectful towards Anand and the chess world, at least for quite a few people. I guess Anand's feelings will weigh quite a lot in such a case.

  • 4 months ago

    savantz

    finding financing for chess events, to include world championships, has always been an "uphill" proposition. western interest in chess is almost nonexistent and sponsors/financiers don't make money on these events, rather they're making 'donations'. it's mostly largesse.

    the fact that they come up with any financing is astounding and $1 million is nothing to sneeze at.

  • 4 months ago

    TeleTwister

    @aspergr I'll agree the world champion can't sit back and dictate all the terms of the match, but surely Carlsen has the right to insist FIDE live up to some kind of professional standard, which clearly is not the case right now. It's unbelievable that FIDE couldn't get a bid on the most marketable world champion since Bobby Fischer and had to resort to a last minute match with half the prize fund. It would appear that no reputable financial backer wants to do business with current FIDE leadership. With all the great young players, it's  remarkable they cannot effectively promote professional chess.  I think the players deserve better leadership. Until FIDE purges itself of the crooks running it, things are going to remain a mess, whether Carlsen plays or not.

  • 4 months ago

    cavelorum

    @Sharkmeister, dude, do you even know where Sochi is? What war zone are you talking about?

  • 4 months ago

    cavelorum

    [double post]

  • 4 months ago

    aspergr

    @highshock Carlsen can't just decide that it's up to him when the match will be played, neither with whom, that's arrogant and disrespectful.

  • 4 months ago

    highshock

    please give magnus to prepare

  • 4 months ago

    highshock

    i will kill u ilumzhinov if u force the current wcc u buisness man

  • 4 months ago

    savantz

    @Inselschaker

    Thx for that information... appears 'team carlsen' has put the "cart before the horse"

  • 4 months ago

    inselschaker

    There is another update - Morten Sand on Facebook via Europe Echecs:

    "Finally, FIDE has extended the deadline for Magnus. But the key question is if this changes anything from Magnus' point of view. I don't think so. The political situation hasn't changed [can FIDE change the political situation?], the match conditions are the same, ... . Magnus again has to show his intentions [well, of course!?]. I really doubt he will sign, but time will tell. Team Carlsen keeps constructing the Magnus brandname.I don't think he really needs this match, and the long-term value of his brandname will be maintained if FIDE deprives him of the title."

    If that's the attitude of team Carlsen, Sutovsky's efforts were in vain!? BTW Morten Sand is a Norwegian lawyer, involved in financial deals around the transfer of Igantius Leong form Ilyumzhinov to Kasparov, subsequently rewarded with the position of deputy tournament director (Leong himself was tournament director) at the Tromso Olympiad.

  • 4 months ago

    aspergr

    @Klurk: At the moment nothing prevents him from meeting Anand. If ever something comes in the way for either of the players (and one never has any guarantee that it won't), then he will have all right to say "Unfortunately I can't play the match right now", but nothing prevents Carlsen from signing like Anand and nothing prevents him from playing the match right now.

    As for "possibility of future sanctions unabling Carlsen to play", I can't think of any. An excuse made up out of thin air, if you ask me. As long as there is no such sanction, there is no excuse.

  • 4 months ago

    savantz

    that was done for the benefit of carlsen when he didn't participate in the previous cycle; he specifically proposed that he would be more willing to participate if the title were challenged on an annual basis.

  • 4 months ago

    pgrossin

    I am sorry if I am not up to date on these matters - but why is it necessary to play the WC again this year, so soon after the last one?

  • 4 months ago

    chessrook1234

    Update: Carlsen's manager Agdestein told VG that the 7 September date is “not very helpful” as now “[Magnus] has to think about this the whole tournament.” Agdestein also stated that they had in fact asked for 17 September. 



    you mean///Magnus was playing without thinking the first 3 rounds? lol


  • 4 months ago

    chessrook1234

    i think Magnus is perfecting a new signature.....and so wants to wait for some time before auto-graphing the contract

     

    Its not a new signature line of cloting for his moedling- I mean- his actual signature

    lol lol

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