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Ivanchuk Leads Peristeri To Victory In Greek Champs

  • SonofPearl
  • on 7/9/11, 7:03 AM.

The 2011 Greek Team Championships ran from 3-8 July in Eretria, Greece. 

The format was a 7 round Swiss team competition with 34 teams taking part. Each team had to consist of 3 men, 1 woman, 2 juniors (U18 and U12) and 2 girls (U18 and U12).  Also, only two foreigners were allowed in each team.

The powerful Peristeri team headed by Vassily Ivanchuk (pictured) and featuring Judit Polgar as their woman player emerged as champions. A selection of games are below.  More information can be found at the official website (in Greek).

The final team standings:


 Team W L D Pts
1  SS Peristeri 6 0 1 13
2  CC Kavala 4 0 3 11
3  HRC Korydallos 5 1 1 11
4  E.O.A.O. Fysiolatris Nikaia 5 1 1 11
5  ES Thessaloniki 5 2 0 10
6  Chess Academy Thes. Galaxias 4 2 1 9
7  Heraklion CC 4 2 1 9
8  Chess Union Amfissa 4 2 1 9
9  Panionios G.S.S. 2210 4 2 1 9
10  Chania Chess Academy 4 3 0 8
11  AO Kydon Chania 4 3 0 8
12  N.O. Kalamatas Poseidon 3 2 2 8
13  Culture Club Florinas 3 2 2 8
14  Ptolemaida Ptolemaios CC 3 2 2 8
15  AEK 3 3 1 7
16  OS Triandria 3 3 1 7
17  O.A.A. Heraklion 3 3 1 7
18  SK.AK.Chalkidos Palamidis The Evvoefs 3 3 1 7
19  F.O. New Irakleion Attica 3 3 1 7
20  Peiraikos OS 3 3 1 7
21  Aigaleo CC 2 3 2 6
22  Ilioupolis CC 3 4 0 6
23  S.A.S. Koropiou 2 3 2 6
24  Kallithea CC 2 3 2 6
25  CC Patron 3 4 0 6
26  AO Zenon Glyfadas 3 4 0 6
27  CC Ikaria J. Tzelepis 2 4 1 5
28  Polichni CC 2 4 1 5
29  Chess Academy of Gazi 2099 2 5 0 4
30  CC Amfissa 2 5 0 4
31  Association of Chess Players of Ioannina 2 5 0 4
32  Papagou 2 5 0 4
33  Chess Union Kalamata 1 6 0 2
34  Aigialeias Chess Union 0 7 0 0

 

 

 

 

Judit Polgar (picture from the official website)

Judit polgar50.jpg

 

 

 

Vassily Ivanchuk (picture from the official website)

Vassily ivanchuk8.jpg

 

 

6136 reads 30 comments
2 votes

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    TadDude

    Re: "Judit Polgar's game from the final round -- which put her into the 2700+ group once again after a few years of absence -- had an interesting (albeit) tactical combination to end the game.  Worth watching!  (Available, for example, from http://www.2700chess.com/)

    By the way, it wasn't an all-women event for Judit, as her opponent in this last round was Peter Prohaszka (clearly a male, given his name Peter)."

    If the players mixed and Polgar played men then was there a possibility of Ivanchuk vs. U12 player?

    It might have looked similar to this.  http://www.chessclub.com/resources/event/corus2003/Round12/round12.html

  • 3 years ago

    ncsapiens

    @_valentin_: Thanks for the discussion of the Mastrovasilis vs. Ivanchuk match. I am still not sure about Mastrovasilis's choice of 6. Bd3. It seems to me that black can play c5 and be pretty much assured of a good game, so it is a pretty weak try as white against a player as strong as Ivanchuk. Be3, g3, and Be2 all look like better moves to me. I am curious what the logic behind Bd3 is (I am sure that Mastrovasilils had a plan). I guess it allows white to push d6, but why not try to prepare for e6?

  • 3 years ago

    kevinkin

    ok ... will ask the question another way  ... why are non-Greeks in this event?

    Kevin

    PS: cant they find a better pic of Chuck?

  • 3 years ago

    _valentin_

    Judit Polgar's game from the final round -- which put her into the 2700+ group once again after a few years of absence -- had an interesting (albeit) tactical combination to end the game.  Worth watching!  (Available, for example, from http://www.2700chess.com/)

    By the way, it wasn't an all-women event for Judit, as her opponent in this last round was Peter Prohaszka (clearly a male, given his name Peter).

  • 3 years ago

    _valentin_

    ncsapiens:  The exchange sacrifice by Ivanchuk seems sound, as it closed down the position (so white can't really use the rooks very effectively) and left white with gaping black squares on the king-side and in the center against a dominant black bishop there.  So, black was risking very little.

    After that, the game was mainly decided (quickly) by the time-control, most likely, as white made a number of mistakes after move 30.  Certainly the rook sacrifice wasn't warranted, though white was feeling increased pressure and the threat of black taking on b2 and pushing their c-pawn forward.  Perhaps the Greek player was hoping for Rxh7 with the threat of Qf7x, but overlook the simple response ...Rf8, after which black threatens checkmate already.

    Even after that, white blundered their rook, as they should have simply exchanged rooks and tried to defend (difficult but plausible) with queen vs. three light pieces.

  • 3 years ago

    predator1

    impressive ivanchuk.

  • 3 years ago

    nxavar

    Ivanchuk played well!

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    "Actually Nd4 is stronger than Ng3 because it is followed by Ng4 hitting the knight and winning an exchange."

    Unfortunately, that is not correct.

     Judit's  18...Nd4 was not best. Had white answered 18...Nd4 with 19. Nf3 (instead of resigning), the line you give is not possible, and white can still put up a fight. The immediate 18...Ng3 is a knockout punch.

  • 3 years ago

    ncsapiens

    Dimitrios vs. Ivanchuk deserves an in-depth game analysis by an expert to enlighten us club players. As a devoted Pirc player myself I loved it, but there are some nuances that I clearly do not understand. Starting with the most obvious questions, why was Ivanchuk's giving up the rook exchange sound? And was the rook sack by Dimitrios just a mistake because he overlooked Ivanchuk's Queen takes Bishop? Somebody please help!

  • 3 years ago

    Abulabanchess

    "instead of 18...Nd4, which was good enough to win (although the resignation was premature), actually much stronger was 18...Ng3, and white could resign with a clear conscious."

    Actually Nd4 is stronger than Ng3 because it is followed by Ng4 hitting the knight and winning an exchange.

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    "There has never been a chess phenomenon like Judith Polgar." --

     Judith makes mistakes like everybody else. For example, looking at her 18 move win...instead of 18...Nd4, which was good enough to win (although the resignation was premature), actually much stronger was 18...Ng3, and white could resign with a clear conscious.

  • 3 years ago

    TadDude

    Looks like Judit Polgar played an all-women event for the first time in a very long time.

    http://www.chessvibes.com/reports/peristeri-with-ivanchuk-polgar-retains-greek-title/

  • 3 years ago

    marwanradman123

    There has never been a chess phenomenon like Judith Polgar.

  • 3 years ago

    FM VPA

    It's nice to watch the pyrotechnics displayed by great playersKiss

  • 3 years ago

    rorschach1985

  • 3 years ago

    emileokada

    Was just wondering why it says that SS Peristeri has only wins and one draw, when Ivanchuk lost one game..

     

    Anyway, it was fun looking at those games, and nice to see Polgar playing.

  • 3 years ago

    fish_food

    "Judit Polgar , simply the best female ever in chess , simply legend"-- yes she is good.

    Kasparov's comment on the Polgars: "They are just like trained dogs", a comment which speaks for itself.

    Judit's father has explained why her results have been the best of 3 Polgar sisters...According to Laszlo, she is the hardest working of the three.

  • 3 years ago

    marwanradman123

    Judit Polgar , simply the best female ever in chess , simply legend

  • 3 years ago

    KahunaNui

    Oh man, Ivanchuk's game with the black pieces in the Pirc defense is so brilliant.

  • 3 years ago

    Summum_Malum

    Nice to see Judit Polgar play the Benoni with Nfd7 against this very solid version for White, and get away with it. I thought it had been largely abandoned by the top due to exactly the f4 version.

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