Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

London Grand Prix 9th Round Thrills

  • SonofPearl
  • on 10/1/12, 12:31 PM.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix banner.jpg

After a rest day on Sunday, the refreshed players were in a fighting mood in round 9 of the FIDE London Grand Prix!

Boris Gelfand lost his first game of the tournament against Alexander Grischuk, which allowed Shakhriyar Mamedyarov to snatch the lead with just two rounds remaining.  Mamedyarov beat Leinier Dominguez Perez with an aggressive attacking game to take his score to 6/9.

Elsewhere, Veselin Topalov scored his second win of the competition against an out-of-sorts Vassily Ivanchuk, and Michael Adams piled on the agony for Hikaru Nakamura by inflicting a fourth consecutive loss on the American.

The standings after 9 of 11 rounds

# Name Fed Elo Pts
1 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  AZE 2729 6
2 Grischuk, Alexander  RUS 2754
3 Topalov, Veselin  BUL 2752
4 Gelfand, Boris  ISR 2738
5 Leko, Peter  HUN 2737 5
6 Wang, Hao  CHN 2742
7 Giri, Anish  NED 2730 4
8 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam  UZB 2684 4
9 Ivanchuk, Vassily  UKR 2769 4
10 Adams, Michael  ENG 2722 4
11 Dominguez Perez, Leinier  CUB 2725
12 Nakamura, Hikaru  USA 2783

.

Alexander Grischuk beat Boris Gelfand in round nine

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Alexander Grischuk Boris Gelfand.jpg

.

.

Beware the Shak attack! Mamedyarov takes the lead in London

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.jpg

.

.

Veselin Topalov is one of three players just half a point behind the leader

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Veselin Topalov.jpg

.

.
Last-minute replacement Michael Adams is holding his own in London

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Michael Adams.jpg

.

.
Peter Leko clung on for a draw against Wang Hao

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Wang Hao Peter Leko.jpg

.

.
Rustam Kasimdzhanov survived a breakthrough in a blocked position by Anish Giri

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 9 Rustam Kasimdzhanov.jpg

.

.

On Sunday's rest day, many of the players visited the Saatchi Gallery's Art of Chess exhibition

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Rest Day The Art of Chess Exhibition.jpg

.
The London Grand Prix is the first tournament of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix series. After London the series moves on to Tashkent, Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris.  Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events.  Details of dates and participants can be found here.

The overall winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.

The schedule for the London Grand Prix:

Arrival & Opening  20th September
1st Round  21st September
2nd Round  22nd September
3rd Round  23rd September
4th Round   24th September
5th Round  25th September
Free Day  26th September
6th Round    27th September
7th Round    28th September
8th Round   29th September
Free Day    30th September
9th Round  1st October
10th Round    2nd October
11th round & Closing  3rd October
Departure  4th October

.

Rounds start at 14:00 local time (13:00 UTC). The time control is 40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves in 1 hour, then an extra 15 minutes to a finish with a 30 second increment after the second time control.

Draws can only be claimed for triple-repetition of position, theoretical draws, or 50-move rule.

The official regulations for the 2012 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

Official website here. Games via TWIC. Photos by Ray Morris-Hill (except Saatchi gallery photo by Nastya Karlovich - see more here).

Look out for coverage at Chess.com/TV!

6307 reads 27 comments
3 votes

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    mottsauce

    Jeez, I love Naka's style, but this is just...bad.  I know he can't be feeling too great, I wonder if something else is going on.  He seems distracted.

  • 2 years ago

    Sahasrara

    Not surprised Grischuk was the one to upset Gelfand, more than once I have heard from other GMs that Grischuk is a very awkward player, employing very unorthodox openings. 

  • 2 years ago

    Kazemi1990

    naka why????? i like your style i am upset

  • 2 years ago

    NajdorfDefense

    Meh, still got like 35 games left. An eternity. Regardless, I'd be surprised if it didn't end up being Carlsen v Anand.

  • 2 years ago

    Czechman

    Nakamura's play is painful to watch. Could you imagine trying to get past this kind of brutal drubbing?!

    Naka-haters can start piling on now... we know how much you love it.

Back to Top

Post your reply: