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London Grand Prix Round 6: Nakamura Blunders

  • SonofPearl
  • on 9/27/12, 1:53 PM.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix banner.jpg

Hikaru Nakamura lost with the white pieces against Wang Hao in round six of the FIDE London Grand Prix. Nakamura blundered with 45.Nxa4 and resigned two moves later.

There were two other decisive results in the round: Veselin Topalov won an impressive game against Leinier Dominguez Perez, and Shakhriyar Mamedyarov defeated Rustam Kasimdzhanov thanks to a blunder from the Uzbek player on move 38.

Boris Gelfand drew his game against Vassily Ivanchuk and leads with 4 points out of 6.

The standings after 6 rounds

Name Fed Elo Pts
Gelfand, Boris  ISR  2738 4
Grischuk, Alexander  RUS  2754
Topalov, Veselin  BUL  2752
Leko, Peter  HUN  2737
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  AZE  2729
Adams, Michael  ENG  2722 3
Wang, Hao  CHN  2742 3
Ivanchuk, Vassily  UKR  2769
Giri, Anish  NED  2730
Dominguez Perez, Leinier  CUB  2725
Nakamura, Hikaru  USA  2783
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam  UZB  2684 2

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Hikaru Nakamura and Wang Hao shake hands at the start of their game

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Hikaru Nakamura Wang Hao.jpg

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Veselin Topalov was impressive against Leinier Dominguez Perez

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Veselin Topalov Leinier Dominguez Perez.jpg

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Shakhriyar Mamedyarov beat Rustam Kasimdzhanov

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Rustam Kasimdzhanov Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.jpg

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Alexander Grischuk and Michael Adams

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Alexander Grischuk Michael Adams.jpg

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Peter Leko and Anish Giri

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Peter Leko Anish Giri.jpg

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Boris Gelfand and Vassily Ivanchuk

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 6 Boris Gelfand Vassily Ivanchuk.jpg

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The London Grand Prix is the first tournament of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix series. After the first contest in London, the series moves on to Tashkent, Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris.  Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events.  Details of dates and participants can be found here.

The overall winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.

The schedule for the London Grand Prix:

Arrival & Opening  20th September
1st Round  21st September
2nd Round  22nd September
3rd Round  23rd September
4th Round   24th September
5th Round  25th September
Free Day  26th September
6th Round    27th September
7th Round    28th September
8th Round   29th September
Free Day    30th September
9th Round  1st October
10th Round    2nd October
11th round & Closing  3rd October
Departure  4th October

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Rounds start at 14:00 local time (13:00 UTC). The time control is 40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves in 1 hour, then an extra 15 minutes to a finish with a 30 second increment after the second time control.

Draws can only be claimed for triple-repetition of position, theoretical draws, or 50-move rule.

The official regulations for the 2012 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

Official website here. Games via TWIC. Photos by Ray Morris-Hill.

Look out for coverage at Chess.com/TV!

5946 reads 29 comments
3 votes

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    hwatuseke

    Nakamura,Hi (2783) vs. Wang Hao (2742)
    It's nice to see an arrogant player like Nakamura lose( Wicked Soul )
    Nakamura Lose  Cool Wang Hao Wou Puche tau
  • 2 years ago

    techron

    Wang bangs out e5, f4, and f3 to sacrifice two pawns to bring the dragon/indian bishop to e5 and dominate the f-file. Not as exciting as Caruana's double exchange sacrifice, but sound double sacs are a weapon against super GMs.

  • 2 years ago

    P_G_M

    Nakamura with today's lost vs Mamedyarov has lost 4 of his last 8 games, with only 2.5 points out of 8 points, and this is the guy who was complaining about his team mates Laughing

     

  • 2 years ago

    caminanteno

    @MaartenSmit Bxf6 was a force move.

  • 2 years ago

    mobidi

    What i can to say about Nakamura's hypermodern-it's not Your style ,Naka.best for You is only 1.e2-e4! ONLY.Fischers debutes are good for You too,just play like Bobby-and books books books ,history ,history ,history-you extremely need it.Your need to study Morphy,Steinitz, ZIEGBERT,Garry Nelson-is for Your Too,and Rubinstein.After such LESSONS-maybe You will be the Champion of the World!Embarassed

  • 2 years ago

    _valentin_

    This is the third loss of Nakamura to Wang Hao this year: he lost twice to him in Biel in July (with both colors) as well.

  • 2 years ago

    SonofPearl

    @ ChocolateTeapot - the official website called the move as a blunder, so that's why I described it as such.  I'm not a strong enough player to argue with them! Wink

  • 2 years ago

    Nosorog79

    ChocolateTeapot: 100% right. I had the very same feeling about this article.

  • 2 years ago

    ChocolateTeapot

    Nakamura was comprehensively outplayed, and to describe his 45th move as a blunder gives the wrong impression. He was completely lost by then, whatever he played.

  • 2 years ago

    drumdaddy

    Nakamura is a nice guy, the haters need to chill.

  • 2 years ago

    mobidi

    Naka is very brave and interesting player-now he is trying to play hypermodern chess,but ,of course,he needs good coach-he playes without understaning,with only believing-young manEmbarassed.Antipod is Gelfand-chess academic...

  • 2 years ago

    FilipinoChess

    and you are just appa lolLaughing

  • 2 years ago

    Appa

    Nakamura is just a  japanese-sri lankan-american fluke , just as Mike Tyson .....lol

  • 2 years ago

    ScottishSpartan

    You should watch Ivanchuk's interviews the guy is so funny and such a good chess player! He has has some of the coolest looking games...well him and Mamedyarov!

  • 2 years ago

    Andre_Harding

    I usually root for Nakamura, but I can understand why some people dislike him. He doesn't always make the most endearing comments, especially on Twitter.

    It's interesting that Wang Hao has become a "problem opponent" for him recently.

    I also feel that sometimes Nakamura doesn't play to his strengths like he could (with his opening choices). I think he would be better off if he took an approach like a Radjabov or Gelfand (Black), or Karjakin or Kramnik (White) and stuck to a few main weapons, rather than diversifying so much like an Ivanchuk or Carlsen. I don't think openings diversification is necessarily good, I think it depends upon the kind of talent/ability the player possesses, and I think Nakamura's abilities would be best highlighted in specific kinds of dynamic positions. The game against Gelfand is a good example: that was not Nakamura's kind of chess, and even worse it was exactly the kind of game Gelfand likes!

    But who am I to question a player rated 2780+?

  • 2 years ago

    FilipinoChess

    It's nice to see a patzer criticize a super GM.Laughing 

  • 2 years ago

    Wicked_Soul

    It's nice to see an arrogant player like Nakamura lose.

  • 2 years ago

    FilipinoChess

    When people criticize here you get the feeling that it would seem that they think they are better in chess or in life than the person they criticize. Funny.Laughing

  • 2 years ago

    Nobodyslamb

    @resulterush thats never going to happen. it does seem though that like every time naka gets close to the 2800 marker he starts to screw up.

  • 2 years ago

    rana2000

    It is sad when someone good lose.. most people start attacking. I guss it is the nature of most people... 

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