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Nakamura The Only Round 10 Winner In London

  • SonofPearl
  • on 10/2/12, 1:43 PM.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix banner.jpg

Hikaru Nakmaura ended his disastrous string of four consecutive losses at the London Grand Prix by beating Anish Giri in the 10th round. However, the top-seeded American still lies in last place with just one round remaining.

The other games in this penultimate round were evenly fought draws. Alexander Grischuk had the best chances for a win, but Rustam Kasimdzhanov survived the Russian's attack and escaped into a drawn endgame.

So Shakhriyar Mamedyarov leads by half a point going into the final round.  The 11th round pairings are: Mamedyarov v Leko, Ivanchuk v Wang Hao, Adams v Dominguez, Giri v Topalov, Grischuk v Nakamura, Gelfand v Kasimdzhanov.

The standings after 10 of 11 rounds

# Name Fed Elo Pts
1 Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  AZE 2729
2 Grischuk, Alexander  RUS 2754 6
3 Topalov, Veselin  BUL 2752 6
4 Gelfand, Boris  ISR 2738 6
5 Leko, Peter  HUN 2737
6 Wang, Hao  CHN 2742 5
7 Adams, Michael  ENG 2722
8 Kasimdzhanov, Rustam  UZB 2684
9 Ivanchuk, Vassily  UKR 2769
10 Giri, Anish  NED 2730 4
11 Dominguez Perez, Leinier  CUB 2725 4
12 Nakamura, Hikaru  USA 2783

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Hikaru Nakamura turned around a 4-game losing streak with a win against Anish Giri

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Hikaru Nakamura Anish Giri.jpg

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Shakhriyar Mamedyarov leads by half a point into the final round

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov.jpg

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Alexander Grischuk (right) had winning chances against Rustam Kasimdzhanov

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Rustam Kasimdzhanov Alexander Grischuk.jpg

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Leinier Dominguez Perez (left) and Vassily Ivanchuk

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Leinier Dominguez Perez Vassily Ivanchuk.jpg

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Peter Leko (left) and Boris Gelfand

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Peter Leko Boris Gelfand.jpg

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Veselin Topalov (left) and Michael Adams

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 10 Veselin Topalov Michael Adams.jpg

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The London Grand Prix is the first tournament of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix series. After London the series moves on to Tashkent, Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris.  Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events.  Details of dates and participants can be found here.

The overall winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.

The final round starts 2 hours earlier, at 12:00 local time (11:00 UTC). The time control is 40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves in 1 hour, then an extra 15 minutes to a finish with a 30 second increment after the second time control.

Draws can only be claimed for triple-repetition of position, theoretical draws, or 50-move rule.

The official regulations for the 2012 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

Official website here. Games via TWIC. Photos by Ray Morris-Hill.

Look out for coverage at Chess.com/TV!

4510 reads 19 comments
2 votes

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    P_G_M

    Extremely poor performance by Nakamura at top level competition, in his last 12 games he had 6 loses, 4 draws and only two wins for a total of 4 points out of 12 points (33%).

    And his only two wins were against a 2684 Kazimdzhanov (who ended sharing 8th with Ivanchuck and Adams one full point ahead of Nakamura) and against the young and still sometimes naive Giri who yesterday lost against Nakamura was due to a huge positional blunder on move 46...,Be5???, and Nakamura being a more experienced player he simply and immediately took advantage of Giri's positional blunder.

    Nakamura needs to stop Tweeting and start preparing better for this top level tournaments if he ever intends to play a WCC candidates tournament.

  • 2 years ago

    diogens

    Just finished the Topalov game (I think today they started earlier so I missed the games Cry).

    Mamedyarov, Gelfand and Topalov shared first

  • 2 years ago

    diogens

    I would like to see Mamedyarov winning. He's a very enterprising player and has no major tournament still in his account.

  • 2 years ago

    JBades6310

    yeah chess_lover11 those series of moves are truly incredible

  • 2 years ago

    Chess_Lover11

    Wow Naka g5, h6, Rxe5!

  • 2 years ago

    ClavierCavalier

    Gelfand is doing pretty well for someone people kept calling a hack during the WCC.

  • 2 years ago

    drumdaddy

    The two pawn sacs left me confused, the rook sac left me breathless. Thanks, Naka!

  • 2 years ago

    P_G_M

    Giri lost the game when he made the positional blunder 46...,Be5 this provided Nakamura with the opportunity to exchange the useless white rook for the passive but mighty black square bishop which had the important role of protecting the weak backward c5 pawn, this bishop was the key to hold the position close and draw.

  • 2 years ago

    mobidi

    @steve_bute Yes, Cochrane Gambit is very interesting-it,s in Nakamura's style.Greatest expert of this opening was Alvis Vitolinsh (from Latvia)-20 century,who will be now (21)?

  • 2 years ago

    mobidi

    Fantastic game by Nakamura-he played like great Harry Nelson Pillsbury!

  • 2 years ago

    steve_bute

    When faced with the Petroff, a real man plays the Cochrane Gambit.

  • 2 years ago

    CM JamesColeman

    52...Kxf7 would have been equally hopeless I think, White just plays Bf5-e4, Black's rook will be completely tied down to b8, White easily blockades the g+h pawns with his king if needs be, meanwhile White will be able to take the c5 pawn and the win won't be very far off.

  • 2 years ago

    XI_XI

    Nakamura played this one brilliantly....bravo naka...double sac pawn sac a rook....wow...impressive stuff....i think he played carelessly and without energy the 4 games he lost probably because he was very dissapointed with the way he lost against ivantchuk....

  • 2 years ago

    mottsauce

    holy crap, Naka's g5/h6/Rxe5 is just unbelievable.  That's the Naka we wanted to see in the first few rounds!

  • 2 years ago

    JBades6310

    I like waldermar's answer better Tongue Out

  • 2 years ago

    SonofPearl

    @ FM KaydenTroff - I believe that there are NO tie-breaks. The prize money and Grand Prix points are shared in the event of a tie.

    The rules are here. (see section 7.2)

  • 2 years ago

    GM KaydenTroff

    If Mamedyarov draws and Gelfand, Topalov, and Grischuk all win. Who takes 1st place on tiebreaks?

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