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Mamedyarov Wins In London Grand Prix Round 3

  • SonofPearl
  • on 9/23/12, 1:14 PM.

London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix banner.jpg

Shakhriyar Mamedyarov was the only winner on day three of the 2012 FIDE London Grand Prix.

Mamedyarov destroyed Anish Giri in just 21 moves to join the leaders Peter Leko and Boris Gelfand on a score of 2 points out of 3.

Top seed Hikaru Nakamura was the last to finish, but was unable to defeat Peter Leko with the white pieces after missing a win in a rook ending.

The standings after 3 rounds:

Name Fed Elo Pts
Gelfand, Boris  ISR 2738 2
Leko, Peter  HUN 2737 2
Mamedyarov, Shakhriyar  AZE 2729 2
Grischuk, Alexander  RUS 2754
Topalov, Veselin  BUL 2752
Dominguez Perez, Leinier  CUB 2725
Adams, Michael  ENG 2722
Nakamura, Hikaru  USA 2783
Wang, Hao  CHN 2742
Ivanchuk, Vassily  UKR 2769 1
Kasimdzhanov, Rustam  UZB 2684 1
Giri, Anish  NED 2730 1

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov Anish Giri.jpg

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Leinier Dominguez Perez Boris Gelfand.jpg

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Vassily Ivanchuk Michael Adams.jpg

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Veselin Topalov Rustam Kasimdzhanov.jpg

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Wang Hao Alexander Grischuk.jpg

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London 2012 FIDE Grand Prix Round 3 Hikaru Nakamura Peter Leko.jpg

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The London Grand Prix is the first tournament of the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix series. After the first contest in London, the series moves on to Tashkent, Lisbon, Madrid, Berlin and Paris.  Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events.  Details of dates and participants can be found here.

The overall winner and runner-up of the Grand Prix qualify for the March 2014 Candidates Tournament.

The schedule for the London Grand Prix:

Arrival & Opening  20th September
1st Round  21st September
2nd Round  22nd September
3rd Round  23rd September
4th Round   24th September
5th Round  25th September
Free Day  26th September
6th Round    27th September
7th Round    28th September
8th Round   29th September
Free Day    30th September
9th Round  1st October
10th Round    2nd October
11th round & Closing  3rd October
Departure  4th October

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Rounds start at 14:00 local time (13:00 UTC). The time control is 40 moves in 2 hours, followed by 20 moves in 1 hour, then an extra 15 minutes to a finish with a 30 second increment after the second time control.

Draws can only be claimed for triple-repetition of position, theoretical draws, or 50-move rule.

The official regulations for the 2012 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

Official website here. Games via TWIC. Photos by Macauley Peterson at the official website.

Look out for coverage at Chess.com/TV!

3193 reads 11 comments
2 votes

Comments


  • 19 months ago

    igorotak_123

    can you play like them? NO!

  • 19 months ago

    LetsReason

    I have never seen Giri as a World Champion contender.  But who knows?  I'm not a World Champion chooser.  

    I'm hoping that a few of these blown games by Naka will instill at least a hint of humility.  I have seen him and his comments to lesser players for years as he has grown online.  He has always been cocky and disrespectful.  I'm not a fan.  

    Glad to see good games though from all of the players.

  • 19 months ago

    ScottishSpartan

    Mamedyarov and Ivanchuk are some of my favorite players to follow, so I'm glad one is doing good. Ivanchuck should hopefully bounce back here and get at least two wins! Lastly, is it just the pictures or does it look like poor lighting in that building?

  • 19 months ago

    mobidi

    @_valentin_ funny case with poor Naka,but we all remember the game Botvinnik -Fischer (varna 1962)-where poor was Bobby-remis with two pawns ( h and a)-x- files with American greatest ChampionsCool

  • 19 months ago

    _valentin_

    Nakamura had a winning position up until move 61, in a rook ending that is about as simple as it gets.  Then, he missed it (61.Rb7?) and Leko defended superbly, on many of his remaining moves picking the only possible way to draw, according to Nalimov Tablebases.  Of course, these drawing (and winning) schemes are in the endgame textbooks studied by junior aspiring players, so one wonders why Nakamura got astray there.  Was he blitzing or too tired?

    This goes back to the point of experience too, I suppose -- while he objectively is stronger than most players, his play is characteristically uneven, suffering from inexplicable (ups and) downs.

  • 19 months ago

    igorotak_123

    nice games that is what we called sports. all of us make mistakes no one is perfect.

  • 19 months ago

    Andre_Harding

    marklimpin:

    I agree partially...Giri is (or was) attending school, which is a big disadvantage. Caruana was always extremely serious about getting to the top.

    But I get the idea some people view Giri as a potential World Champion. I don't see it.

  • 19 months ago

    marklimpin

    Giri is a overrated player!! Fabiano Carruana is much better than him.

  • 19 months ago

    lethal_banzai

    Grishuk also blundered big time

  • 19 months ago

    TheMagicianPaul

    Giri, remember to castle!

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