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Nakamura At The Italian Club Championships

  • SonofPearl
  • on 5/1/12, 11:14 AM.

National chess leagues or team championships take place in most countries, not only those with the highest profile events such as the Schachbundesliga and the Russian Team Championships.

The Italian Team Chess Championship recently took place in Arvier, Aosta Valley between 27 April and 1 May.  The event was a 7-round Swiss with 14 teams competing and some big-name imports were playing.  

The winners were Obiettivo Risarcimento from Padova, who numbered Fabiano Caruana and Hikaru Nakamura among their squad. 

Interestingly, when Nakamura and Caruana both played it was Nakamura who played on top board, although it's not clear how the choice was made between these two closely matched young rivals.

The final team standings were:

# Team W L D MP BP
1 Ob. Risarcimento Padova 6 0 1 13 19.0
2 Scavolini Datagest Pesaro 6 1 0 12 20.5
3 Chieti 4 2 1 9 16.5
4 Libertas Nereto 3 2 2 8 16.5
5 Centro Studi Test Palermo 2 2 3 7 15.5
6 SS Triestina 3 3 1 7 14.0
7 Latina 3 3 1 7 13.5
8 Acc. Scacch. Italiana Bologna 3 3 1 7 13.5
9 SS Milanese 2 3 2 6 12.5
10 L'Arrocco A di Roma 2 3 2 6 12.0
11 CPS Banca Nuova 2 3 2 6 11.5
12 Pizzato Elettr. Scacchi Marostica 1 4 2 4 10.5
13 SS Eporediese Ivrea 1 5 1 3 10.5
14 CSKB Torveca Caffè Vigevano 1 5 1 3 10.0

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Nakamura's participation is part of his preparation for the 2012 US Chess Championships starting 8 May in St.Louis. Nakamura blogged yesterday about his activities since his 6th place finish at Tata Steel in January, and answered some recent criticism of his participation in the Grand Pacific Open, in Victoria, Canada:

"I am also aware that certain people on other blogs felt the need to belittle me for playing a weekend tournament with masters and experts in an attempt at picking up rating points. While rating points do matter, this tournament was simply an opportunity for me to play chess, enjoy a weekend with friends and have the opportunity to give back to the British Columbia chess community. The countless kids and parents who wanted photographs or signatures is what ultimately matters most. Having the ability to make a difference in the lives of people and be an inspiration is what will comprise the lasting memories I have of chess long after I have quit".

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4369 reads 30 comments
4 votes

Comments


  • 2 years ago

    sittingpawn

    @jester you said "sounds like all BS to me...he seems to be saying what his PR people instructed him to.

    This was nothing more than picking up a paycheque, and some rating points. And actually, I don't see anything wrong with this either...just be man about it, and not try to deceive the public...and your fans..." So you say what he said sounds like BS that he's essentially lying and only there to pick up a paycheck and that he's decieving  people. So if you were proven to be wrong this is what you would take back.

  • 2 years ago

    P_G_M

    It is nice to see Caruana winning with a Benko Gambit and Nakamura with a Dutch Defense!!!

    Both games shown here were really fun and instructive Laughing

  • 2 years ago

    jesterville

    "sittingpawn", what is there to take back? I was not there, I did not say these things, I did not go to any tournament looking for an autograph and was disappointed...people I know did...and all I did was indicate what their experiences were. If Naka comes out tomorrow and indicated that the signing and photo stuff was not done at the playinghall, but rather somewhere else...how does that negate what I have stated?

  • 2 years ago

    sittingpawn

    "And to top it off friends of mine, who actually went to the tournament supports the view that he appeared just before the start, and disappeared just as quickly...yet he talks about giving back, and being available for autographs and pictures...sounds like all BS to me...he seems to be saying what his PR people instructed him to."

    So curious jesterville, if it turns out that he did meet with kids and signed autographs and did all that stuff, you'll take back what you said about him? I can imagine that just before a match he doesn't want to walk around and schmooze with people and just after a match he likely goes back and reviews the game while it's fresh, but this doesn't mean that he just then sat in his hotel and did nothing to hang out with friends or meet fans or sign autographs.

  • 2 years ago

    trlns

    No problem with Nakamura playing in the tournament he did - in principle. However, the hypocrisy doing so after what he said about Caruana makes it laughable.

    If you look at the calibre of opponents Caruana has faced in the last couple of rating periods in open tournaments, it's simply insane. Only 6 of the 30 in the last rating period were under 2500 (early round opponents). While over 1/2 the guys he faced in the last rating period alone where 2600+. That's super solid GM territory and you need to win a considerable number of those games to protect your rating, let alone increase it. Respect for this young man, he's really embracing the challenge to improve himself.

    Nakamura is a rare talent, but good grief, the only thing he seems to work hard at is making himself look like a tool.

  • 2 years ago

    sittingpawn

    "After seeing people picking up rating points off of beating weaker players, I am convinced chess ratings should be weighted like in tennis."

    I'm curious how this is hypocritical? I mean I think here we are again with people taking his words and placing unsaid meaning into them to make it fit their opinions of the guy. What I read is a critque of the chess elo rating system... I mean if you read further and notice in his discussion with Polgar he mentions only the rating and not the players who play in them, it's clear that he's more  bothered by how tournaments which are clearly not equal get equal weight within the ratings system. It's perfectly reasonable for him to not like how Caruana's ratings grew in a weak tournament but still feel there's nothing wrong with Caruana playing in it. If he complained about stronger players playing weaker ones for ratings then he would be hypocritical, but since he's talking about the the ratings system I don't find what you others do.

  • 2 years ago

    jesterville

    In an open tounament anyone is free to join. Nothing is wrong with this...this is how it should be. But when a strong GM like Naka openly cries down Caruana for joining a tounament in Iceland (and he did so because Caruana overtook him in the rating standings after this tournament)...and then a few weeks later Naka joins one where the players are not even at GM level (2500)...wow, talk about the pot calling the kettle black.

    And to top it off friends of mine, who actually went to the tournament supports the view that he appeared just before the start, and disappeared just as quickly...yet he talks about giving back, and being available for autographs and pictures...sounds like all BS to me...he seems to be saying what his PR people instructed him to.

    This was nothing more than picking up a paycheque, and some rating points. And actually, I don't see anything wrong with this either...just be man about it, and not try to deceive the public...and your fans...

  • 2 years ago

    SonofPearl

    @ chessmaster102  -TWIC has a pgn file for the tournament:

    http://www.chess.co.uk/twic/chessnews/events/grand-pacific-open-2012

  • 2 years ago

    chessmaster102

    Does anyone know where I can get the PGN files of games played in nakamura playing in the Grand Pacific Open, in Victoria, Canada

  • 2 years ago

    Aknaim

    @jocelasi I don't think you read anything i wrote properly.

    Plus it was Nakamura who was claiming Caruana was picking up rating points by playing against weak opposition, its his own words your using to defend him....

    Yet he goes and does the same...

    The only one risking rating points is Caruana, infact he went and lost a game yesterday after like a 30 game win/draw streak. He went down 7.9 points cause of his loss.

    So frankly considering the level of Caruana's opposition and looking and Nakamura's it's Nakamura picking up rating points not Caruana, if anything Caruana still plays against 2400+ for 90-95% of his last 30-40 games. Yet Nakamura played strictly against opponents under 2350, and claims that it doesn't count as picking up rating points.

    If he wants to play against weaker players by ALL means go and do it. Just don't belittle others for the same thing.

  • 2 years ago

    jocelasi

    Picking points? You must be kidding.  I think Naka has more to lose than to gain by joining the above-mentioned tournament.  But because of his love for the sport he shared his time and he risked his rating points (but no one got lucky) and played competitively.  Aren't you happy that "a shark is playing with the school of fish?"  It is an opportunity for the Canadian chess afficianados to be playing against a big chess star.    

  • 2 years ago

    jesterville

    ...and these were the top 10 when he criticized Caruana for winning in Iceland-

    1  Caruana Fabiano ITA 2767 7.5 56.0 44.0
    2  Sokolov Ivan NED 2653 7.0 56.0 43.5
    3  Navara David CZE 2700 7.0 55.5 44.0
    4  Jones Gawain C B ENG 2635 7.0 53.0 41.0
    5  Avrukh Boris ISR 2591 7.0 51.5 42.0
    6  Hou Yifan CHN 2639 7.0 51.5 40.0
    7  Maze Sebastien FRA 2577 7.0 50.0 39.5
    8  Danielsen Henrik ISL 2504 7.0 48.5 38.0
    9  Cheparinov Ivan BUL 2664 6.5 56.0 44.5
    10  Hess Robert L USA 2635 6.5 53.5 42.0

    Clearly, Naka's opponents were patzers in comparison to Caruna's...

  • 2 years ago

    jesterville

    After seeing people picking up rating points off of beating weaker players, I am convinced chess ratings should be weighted like in tennis."

    I agree that he is a hypocrite...in fact, he was refering to Caruana when he made the above statement.

  • 2 years ago

    sryiwannadraw

    Frown

  • 2 years ago

    Aknaim

    Also look at the opposition in the Grand Pacific Open (B.C., Canada)

    Tell me the opposition isn't a "weak" field for Nakamura....

    Grand Pacific Open final standings:

    1. GM Hikaru Nakamura 2731 - 6.0/6.0

    2. WGM Nino Maisuradze 2346 - 5.0

    3-8. NM Nicolas Haynes 2320, NM Alisher Sanetullaev 2150, Jamin Gluckie 2156, NM Lucas Davies 2217, FM John C Yoos 2393 and NM Howard Wu 2148 - 4.5 9-15. NM Andrei Moffat 2172, NM Tanraj S Sohal 2208, Benedict Daswani 2041, Georgi Kostadinov 2124, FM Jason Cao 2033, Janak Awatramani 1882 and James Chan 1998 - 4.0 etc (67 players)

  • 2 years ago

    Aknaim

    I am perfectly fine with top level 2700+ chess players playing in any event they like. They should be able to whatever they want it's their own rating their risking.

    Yet the reason I wrote my previous comment was not to say that top level players shouldn't play against lower rated players in weaker tournaments. If they are better then they shouldn't be restrained to playing only against other high rated players.

    In fact this is what makes Caruana such a fresh player to watch in the top 10 he is constantly playing in tournaments consisting of just masters and experts all the way up to the elite. This adds variety and we don't see all those "boring" draws.

    What I am against is people belittling others about where they play. Yet going around doing the same and claiming that others are now belittling them. Nakamura is just being a complete hypocrite.

    After seeing people picking up rating points off of beating weaker players, I am convinced chess ratings should be weighted like in tennis."

    But tennis ranking has its own problem. Caroline Wozniacki was ranked #1 without winning a single Grand Slam.

     

    Perhaps, but there is no way that playing against a weak field in Iceland should be the same as playing in Wijk aan Zee..."

     

  • 2 years ago

    zotalegre

    «Having the ability to make a difference in the lives of people and be an inspiration is what will comprise the lasting memories I have of chess long after I have quit»  HIkaru Nakamura

    HIHI hihi ahahahaha lol hihiaaahahahaha ok ok cóf ahahahahhihi



  • 2 years ago

    NM BMcC333

    He can play wherever he wants in my opinion, but there is a reason the other 2700s avoid the masses. David could have taken a big chunk of rating points and his hide with 38 Qxg4 instead of losing his mind and giving away his queen. The strange thing, especially for a 2600 is that he clearly sees he can hang his queen since he did it the move before with Rf2.

  • 2 years ago

    griffinlongboards

    I was at the Grand Pacific Open and I saw him there. He said "The countless kids and parents who wanted photographs or signatures is what ultimately matters most." Well he did say that they want photos and signatures but he didn't say anything about giving them to anyone. Every day showed up 2 seconds before the games and left right after. I dont know when he would have had time. 

  • 2 years ago

    FreeRepublic

    Naka certainly is well spoken. In this case, he extends a great message. As to his sincerely, I can offer no opinion as I have not followed his words and actions closely. I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt.

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