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Aronian Keeps Up The Pace In Tata Steel

  • SonofPearl
  • on 1/25/12, 1:35 PM.

Official Website Round 10 Report

Armenian GM Levon Aronian seemed well on his way to win the 10,000-euro first prize in Grandmaster Group A of the 74th annual Tata Steel Tournament at Wijk-aan-Zee on Wednesday.

With just three more rounds to go in this, the world’s strongest chess event, he defeated Dutch champion Anish Giri with black to remain on top of the standings, one point ahead of the competition.

Of the runners-up sharing second place at the outset of the tenth round, only Vassily Ivanchuk of the Ukraine managed to keep up the pace, winning his game with black against David Navara of the Czech Republic. Azerbaijan’s Teimour Radjabov and Norway’s Magnus Carlsen were both held to a draw and fell back to the third spot.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Anish Giri - Lev Aronian.jpg

 

“It was a very complicated game,” Aronian said about his victory over Giri, which came after 43 moves from a rare line of the Queen’s Gambit and in which preparation played a crucial part. The Armenian knew the line quite well.

“Actually, I was the first person to try 7.Be2 dxc4 8.0-0 with white myself and, with black, I now played the new 8…Nb6, which may not have been the best move, but white must know how to play. Anish didn’t quite grasp the position. After 13.Bf3 Rxf3, maybe it was unclear but it was easy for black to play. I had a clear plan and, somehow, Anish began to play very badly. Maybe he was upset it wasn’t what he had prepared for. He committed some inaccuracies and after that it was more or less easy for me.”

 

Asked whether he felt he was going win the tournament, Aronian smiled and said: “We’ll have to wait and see, don’t we? Anyway, I hope I’ll be able to play the next few games as well as I did today.” Giri, who felt he “was a little bit unlucky, getting these coffee-house positions against coffee-house players” had different hopes for the remainder of the tournament. “Maybe, after three defeats in a row, it is time for a new approach: not to try anything and just play better.”

 

 

 

 

The ‘Piet Zwart Prize’ – 500 euros set aside for the best game of the day by the municipalities of Velsen and Beverwijk – went to Ivanchuk. GM Ivan Sokolov was impressed by the way ‘Chucky’ handled the modern Benoni line, in which black delays castling, changing pieces and freeing his game. “The most interesting aspect was that after move 27, the black knight on g7 turns out to be much stronger than the white bishop on d3, as he demonstrated convincingly,” Sokolov said.

Ivanchuk himself felt that he “was in good shape the last few days” and said that Navara had giving him a helping hand, allowing the devastating 30.Bxf5 Re2. “Before that, I believe the position was maybe about equal.”

Tata 2012 Round 10 David Navara - Vassily Ivanchuk.jpg

 

 

 

Carlsen, the world highest ranked player but still smarting from his defeat at the hands of Russia’s Sergey Karjakin in the previous round, settled for a quiet draw after just 21 moves with black from a semi-Slav Defense against Hikaru Nakamura of the U.S., who said “the opening came as a surprise” for him. “Anyway, I haven’t been feeling too well these last few days, and so,” accepting the peace offer “seemed the practical thing to do. After all, the onus wasn’t on me here. I mean, he’s the stronger player,” Nakamura said.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Hikaru Nakamura - Magnus Carlsen.jpg

 

 

 

Radjabov splitting the point with Holland’s Loek van Wely was a comedy of errors caused by the fact that both players were in time trouble. Their game, from a Dutch Defense with the Azeri playing white, was entirely balanced until Radjabov reached the time control with 40.Qf3?? and proposed a draw. With only seconds left on his clock, Van Wely went for the half point – a serious blunder, as 40…Ra2! would at least have earned him a piece.

“It seemed a very reasonable peace offer to me,” said Van Wely, for whom it was his tenth consecutive draw. “Of course, if I’d had a little more time to consider his proposal …”

Tata 2012 Round 10 Teimour Radjabov - Loek van Wely.jpg

 

 

 

The draw between World Championship Challenger Boris Gelfand of Israel and Azerbaijan’s Vugar Gashimov, in 25 moves from a Queen’s Indian, was less spectacular with neither player getting any chances or making any serious mistakes.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Boris Gelfand - Vugar Gashimov.jpg

 

 

There were mistakes galore, however, in Karjakin’s Ruy Lopez with white against U.S. champion Gata Kamsky. Karjakin, still in a winning mood after his victory over Carlsen, was too aggressive, Kamsky felt. “It was a very strange game,” he said, in which “I messed up the opening. But then when I played 18…Qc7, he forgot that I had the retreat 19.Qg3 Bd8 after which I equalized because he couldn’t get the two bishops any longer. 22.Nf5 was a mistake, because after 22…Bxf5 23.exf5, he gets no attacking chances and I can just push my pawn and position my rooks.” Karjakin resigned after the time control in a hopeless position.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Sergey Karjakin - Gata Kamsky.jpg

 

 

 

The final Group-A game of the day also ended in a victory for black, with Italy’s Fabiano Caruano beating Bulgaria’s Veselin Topalov in 39 moves from rare line of the Sicilian Defense.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Veselin Topalov - Fabiano Caruana.jpg

 

 

The standings in Group A after round 10:

Aronian, Levon      ARM  2805
Ivanchuk, Vassily      UKR  2766
Carlsen, Magnus      NOR  2835 6
Radjabov, Teimour      AZE  2773 6
Caruana, Fabiano      ITA  2736
Nakamura, Hikaru      USA  2759
Kamsky, Gata      USA  2732 5
Van Wely, Loek      NED  2692 5
Karjakin, Sergey      RUS  2769
Giri, Anish      NED  2714 4
Topalov, Veselin      BUL  2770 4
Gashimov, Vugar      AZE  2761 4
Gelfand, Boris      ISR  2739 4
Navara, David      CZE  2712

 

In Grandmaster Group B, Sokolov awarded the daily prize of 250 euros to Russia’s Sacha Motylev for his “brilliant technical victory with white” against Holland’s Sipke Ernst in an open Ruy Lopez that took moves. “Ernst was gradually pushed off the board.”

Tata 2012 Round 10 Motylev - Ernst.jpg

 

 

India’s Pentala Harikrishna kept the lead in this group after downing Italy’s Daniele Vocaturo in 27 moves with white from a Catalan opening. It was Harikrishna’s sixth victory from the ten rounds played so far.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Harikrishna - Vocaturo.jpg

 

 

The results from round 10 in Group B:

Motylev, Alexander   1-0 
Ernst, Sipke  
Harikrishna, Pentala   1-0 
Vocaturo, Daniele 
Reinderman, Dimitri   1-0 
Nyzhnyk, Illya 
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro   ½-½ 
Tiviakov, Sergei 
Lahno, Kateryna   ½-½ 
Potkin, Vladimir 
Harika, Dronavalli   ½-½ 
Timman, Jan H 
Cmilyte, Viktorija  0-1 L'Ami, Erwin  

 

The standings after round 10 in Group B:

Harikrishna, Pentala    IND    2665 8
Motylev, Alexander    RUS    2677 7
L'Ami, Erwin    NED    2596 7
Bruzon Batista, Lazaro    CUB    2691
Reinderman, Dimitri    NED    2581 5
Tiviakov, Sergei    NED    2677 5
Nyzhnyk, Illya    UKR    2568
Ernst, Sipke    NED    2606 4
Vocaturo, Daniele    ITA    2545 4
Potkin, Vladimir    RUS    2684 4
Timman, Jan H    NED    2571 4
Lahno, Kateryna    UKR    2557 4
Cmilyte, Viktorija    LTU    2503
Harika, Dronavalli    IND    2516

 

Holland’s Pieter Hopman took the 100-euro day prize in group C for his streamlined victory with white in 41 moves from a Slav Defense against leader Hans Tikkanen. Russia’s Maxim Turov became the sole leader in this group after a quick draw in 16 moves with black against Germany’s Elisabeth Paehtz. Tikkanen fell back to second place, half a point behind Turov.

Tata 2012 Round 10 Hopman - Tikkanen.jpg

 

 

 

The results from round 10 in Group C:

Hopman, Pieter   1-0    Tikkanen, Hans  
Grover, Sahaj   1-0    Ootes, Lars 
Sadler, Matthew D   1-0    Haast, Anne 
Tania, Sachdev   1-0    Schut, Lisa 
Paehtz, Elisabeth   ½-½    Turov, Maxim 
Brandenburg, Daan   1-0    Danielian, Elina 
Adhiban, Baskaran  ½-½    Goudriaan, Etienne 

 

The standings after round 10 in Group C:

Turov, Maxim    RUS 2645 8
Tikkanen, Hans    SWE 2549
Adhiban, Baskaran    IND 2561 7
Brandenburg, Daan    NED 2527 6
Grover, Sahaj    IND 2532 6
Sadler, Matthew D    ENG 2660 6
Goudriaan, Etienne    NED 2279
Paehtz, Elisabeth    GER 2454
Tania, Sachdev    IND 2411
Schut, Lisa    NED 2290 4
Ootes, Lars    NED 2326 3
Danielian, Elina    ARM 2490 3
Haast, Anne    NED 2290 3
Hopman, Pieter    NED 2342 3

 

Report and photos from the official website coverage. Videos by Freshmen media.

9597 reads 35 comments
2 votes

Comments


  • 3 years ago

    dracoms

    You're right. I miscalculated.

  • 3 years ago

    C0ldSh0ckW1z

    Your math is a bit off dracoms.  Aronian still has the outright lead with 7.5, Carlsen and Radjabov are right behind him with 7, with Ivanchuk further back.

  • 3 years ago

    dracoms

    Carlsen and Radjabov won, Aronian lost. Three way tie for first again!

    Ivanchuck loses to fall half point behind the leaders.

  • 3 years ago

    Tobbie

    iz lyk aronian gonna win

  • 3 years ago

    Twobit

    Oh no, yet another rest day; Carlsen will rest himself into losing the next game again...

  • 3 years ago

    Hopleaf

    I wonder how Aronian took Anish's comment about finding himself in "coffee house positions against coffee house players" It almost sounded like a slight against Aronian.

  • 3 years ago

    2pacinchess

    Its only my opinion, but I think they also take a look at how many prices for the best game that player has already won, and tries to give the price to the player who has fewer/none prices for the best game.

  • 3 years ago

    fabelhaft

    "why was chucky's game chosen ahead of Aronian's for the prize?"

    Good question, Aronian's game was really memorable, maybe the game of the tournament, while Navara just donated another point in a way that wasn't too exciting.

  • 3 years ago

    novzki41

    interesting to note that black won a majority of games today..  i am WAITING for carlsen to make a very INTERESTING WIN using the black pieces since he always draws while using black!!

  • 3 years ago

    Ckhaan

    So, the black pieces won 4 (5 if you take LVW's) out of 6 games. Weren't they supposed to be handicapped, fighting for draws and such?

  • 3 years ago

    Nao83

    lilAj, actually Naka said "he's supposed to be the better player". It makes a great difference.

  • 3 years ago

    monib112

    Anish over confident!!

  • 3 years ago

    SonofPearl

    Thanks all - I've removed the variation in the Radjabov game - I was a bit hasty there! Laughing

  • 3 years ago

    Stella_Woo

    In the Radjabov's game the suggested move should not have been 42... Qxb3 but Ra1+ with Rb1, Rxb1+, Bxb1, Rd1+, Qf1 and Rxf1# to follow

  • 3 years ago

    Stella_Woo

    Radjabov has only one shirt

  • 3 years ago

    NM flashboy2222

    Aronian o_O

  • 3 years ago

    TALminator

    Question:

    In the Radjabov-Van Wely game, was white considering 40. Qg2 instead of Qf3 and  let go too soon?

  • 3 years ago

    TALminator

    @sonofpearl: In the Radjabov-Van Wely game @sonofpearl, you note that if

    41. Qg3 Qd5+ 42. Rg2 Qxb3. 

    Black surely has to trade rooks first on g2 (42...Rxg2 43. Qxg2 Qxb3); otherwise, 43. Qxg7mate

  • 3 years ago

    JustinLuti

    Radjabov - Van Wely:
    In the analysis after 42. ... Qxb3  doesn't mate in one follow?

     

    Old lesson: when your opponent makes a sudden draw offer, something's fishy!

  • 3 years ago

    jesterville

    wow...Carlsen and Aronian, both neck and neck fighting for the number one rated spot...and the chance to topple Kasparov's record (which has been standing since 1999). Will Aronian take over the top spot from the kid from Norway? Will either be able to put together a string of wins to reach 2851? Garry is probably sleeping with both fingers crossed these nights...

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