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Tie-break To Decide 2010 U.S. Champion

  • SonofPearl
  • on 5/25/10, 8:37 AM.

Gata_Kamsky2.jpgBy FM Mike Klein

After a draw between GM Yury Shulman and GM Gata Kamsky today, the 2010 U.S. Championship will be decided by a tiebreaker. Shulman and Kamsky will play again today at 11 a.m. Eastern Time. They have each earned $25,000 for being tied so far.

The game featured a battle of preparation. Both men were familiar with the variations arising from the Grunfeld Defense, but even so Kamsky played much more quickly. For the second game in a row, Shulman said he had studied the position, but struggled to remember his analysis. Shulman said he last looked at the variations from the game 15 years ago.

The players repeated their game from the 2009 U.S. Championship, until Kamsky differed with 10..Bxc3+. Last year he played the more common 10Ne5. After sacrificing the pawn, Shulman got control of the center and began simultaneous operations against Kamsky’s king, previously weakened by trading the fianchettoed bishop.  I knew at worst I would have some kind of perpetual, so I felt kind of safe, Shulman said.


I think the whole variation is basically a draw, Kamsky said.

Neither player gave much away regarding their thoughts or emotions heading into tomorrow’s sudden-death final. I’ve found that if I get so excited and worked up before the game, it’s not going to help me, Kamsky said.

On whether or not the players planned to play in the $10,000 blitz tournament yesterday evening, Kamsky called the opportunity tempting but said he would only play if Shulman played. Although the carrot was dangled, neither competitor came out to compete, but Kamsky did make an appearance as an interested spectator.

Shulman left the Chess Club & Scholastic Center of Saint Louis right after his game to begin preparing for the tiebreak. The first question both players will contend with is how much time they will bid. Shulman and Kamsky will begin the game today by secretly bidding an amount of time they would be willing to accept. The player with the lower bid will get that amount of time (plus a five-second increment) and the other player will get 60 minutes. The lower bidding player will also get choice of color, with Black having draw odds. Most players expect that unless the winning bid is close to 60 minutes, then the person with less time will choose Black.

The winner of the tiebreak gets an extra $5,000 and the title of 2010 U.S. Champion. Shulman last won the title in 2008 and Kamsky in 1991.

In the third place game, GM Alex Onischuk and GM Hikaru Nakamura also drew. They finish equal third and both win $12,500.

 

 


 

UPDATE: KAMSKY WINS THE TIEBREAK BY DRAWING WITH BLACK (HIS BID OF 25 MINUTES WON HIM THE CHOICE OF COLOURS).

 

2819 reads 17 comments
3 votes

Comments


  • 4 years ago

    musiclife

    Still, he took draw odds with a more than 2:1 time disadvantage.  That's a huge time differential!

  • 4 years ago

    TheWontrob

    That tie-break system is silly. Play pairs of rapid games or something. Draw odds for a victory is ridiculous. It's like first score wins in the NFL overtime Yell

  • 4 years ago

    musiclife

    I'm amazed that Gata took at 35 min disadvantage for black draw odds.  That's a pretty strong statement that white wouldn't be able to drum up any complications.

  • 4 years ago

    nerv

    I probably understand now. That one who bids lower must have this time control. (I thought that BLACK must have it). But nobody can expect that the man with the lower time take white pieces. It is whole insane.

  • 4 years ago

    msoewulff

    what was shulman's bid?

  • 4 years ago

    jlueke

    The tie break was entertaining but it doesn't leave you thinking the winner played the best chess.  I'd rather they try something with a longer time control, maybe a Chess960 game

  • 4 years ago

    Dauerschach

    Yeah, I think this play-off rule is a little bit strange. But I enjoyed as being an audience anyway. :-)

  • 4 years ago

    nerv

    "The player with the lower bid will get that amount of time (plus a five-second increment) and the other player will get 60 minutes. The lower bidding player will also get choice of color, with Black having draw odds." That doesn't make any sense. The palyer who bid lower must have black pieces, doesn't he?

  • 4 years ago

    dementko

    Of course each player is a native American.

  • 4 years ago

    zankfrappa

    That was exciting but once again I don't like the idea of the title being
    decided by all those fast moves.

  • 4 years ago

    cofail

    It is all over Kamsky won as black. (or drew, i dont know, but he won overall)

  • 4 years ago

    dominicbody2

    The commentary on the official website is excellent.

  • 4 years ago

    zankfrappa

    Kamsky is away from the board with his clock running!  He is very confident.

  • 4 years ago

    zankfrappa

    He wasn't taking that much time to recapture the bishop.  The board was a
    move behind.

  • 4 years ago

    zankfrappa

    Why is Shulman spending so much time to recapture the bishop?

  • 4 years ago

    zankfrappa

    Shulman has already given back 9 minutes of his 35 minute advantage.

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