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Topalov Wins 2013 Zug Grand Prix

  • SonofPearl
  • on 4/30/13, 11:58 AM.

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Veselin Topalov finished the FIDE Zug Grand Prix in style by winning his final round game against Sergey Karjakin.

That victory, the only decisive game of the final round, ensured that Topalov scored the maximum 170 Grand Prix ranking points for sole first place.  He now leads the overall standings by 70 clear points (see below).

The overall winner and runner-up of the 2012/13 Grand Prix series will qualify for the next Candidates Tournament, expected to be held in March 2014.

All other games in the final round were drawn.

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The final standings in the Zug Grand Prix

# Name Elo Fed Pts
1 Topalov Veselin 2771 BUL 8
2 Nakamura Hikaru 2767 USA
3 Ponomariov Ruslan 2733 UKR 6
4 Caruana Fabiano 2772 ITA 6
5 Kamsky Gata 2741 USA
6 Morozevich Alexander 2758 RUS
7 Karjakin Sergey 2786 RUS 5
8 Giri Anish 2727 NED 5
9 Leko Peter 2744 HUN 5
10 Radjabov Teimour 2793 AZE
11 Kasimdzhanov Rustam 2709 UZB
12 Mamedyarov Shakhriyar 2766 AZE

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Veselin Topalov won the tournament by an impressive 1½ point margin

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Each tournament is a single round-robin featuring 12 out of the 18 players in the Grand Prix, and each player competes in four of the six events. The best 3 scores of each player count towards their overall score. The official regulations for the 2012/13 FIDE Grand Prix can be found here.

Magnus Carlsen, Levon Aronian, Vladimir Kramnik and Viswanathan Anand declined to participate in the Grand Prix as they are likely to qualify for the 2014 Candidates by virtue of their high ratings (or status as World Champion).

The latest Grand Prix standings after 3 of 6 competitions

# Player  Elo London  Tashkent  Zug  Pts
1  Veselin Topalov (BUL)  2752 140 –  170 310
2  Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (AZE)  2729 140 80 20 240
3  Alexander Morozevich (RUS)  2770 –  140 75 215
4  Wang Hao (CHN)  2726 70 140 –  210
5  Sergey Karjakin (RUS)  2785 –  140 50 190
6  Fabiano Caruana (ITA)  2773 –  80 100 180
7  Peter Leko (HUN)  2737 80 50 50 180
8  Boris Gelfand (ISR)  2738 140 30 –  170
9  Hikaru Nakamura (USA)  2778 15 –  140 155
10  Ruslan Ponomariov (UKR)  2734 –  50 100 150
11  Rustam Kasimdzhanov (UZB)  2684 35 80 20 135
12  Alexander Grischuk (RUS)  2763 90 –  –  90
13  Gata Kamsky (USA) 2746 –  10 75 85
14  Anish Giri (NED)  2711 15 –  50 65
15  Michael Adams (ENG) 2722 55 –  –  55
16  Vassily Ivanchuk (UKR)  2769 55 –  –  55
17  Leinier Domínguez (CUB)  2725 35 20 –  55
18  Peter Svidler (RUS)  2749 –  50 –  50
19  Teimour Radjabov (AZE)  2788 –  –  20 20

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Photos by Anastasiya Karlovich. Games via TWIC. Overall standings table via Wikipedia.

5825 reads 40 comments
6 votes

Comments


  • 16 months ago

    treyws

    Topalov is amazing!!!!!!!!!!  2793!!!!!! +22!

  • 16 months ago

    dzindzifan

    Nice Job, Hikaru!  I was hoping you'd tie but I'm glad you had a good showing cranking out 140 more GP points is huge.

  • 16 months ago

    kinimaru

    bravo

  • 16 months ago

    SonofPearl

    @ axm149 - now corrected! Smile

  • 16 months ago

    Aknaim

    Just incase people didn't notice Topalov's new rating.... http://www.2700chess.com/ .... All thanks to this tourney too Sealed. Now all the former/current Champs are side by side on the ratings list Wink

  • 16 months ago

    C0ldSh0ckW1z

    58. Ke4 in Nakamura vs Caruana was not an actual move.  The arbiter moved the white king to e4 and the black king to e5 on the board to signify the draw.  It just happened that Ke4 was a legal move in the position and the arbiter most likely moved the white king first.

  • 16 months ago

    Melchizedek10

    Nice to see Topalov back in form...very likely be one of the three winner and the top winner in points earn of the 5 venues.

  • 16 months ago

    cesurpawn

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 16 months ago

    axm149

    jimmyjs it is not possible to stop the promotion if Ke4's actually been played, it must have been an arbiter move as KingsEye was saying..

  • 16 months ago

    Gaffneychess

    Most likely the last move was incorrectly shown.  If Naka wen to the corner then it's a wrong colored bishop-rook pawn ending which is drawn

  • 16 months ago

    axm149

    What if 58. Ke4 Kg4? 

    How's white gonna get to the h1 square? I don't see it...

  • 16 months ago

    jimmyjs

    Axm149: Look up your basic endgames. It's the wrong color bishop. White puts his king in the corner and black can't force it out.

  • 16 months ago

    rjb

    YES! go topalov!

  • 16 months ago

    APawnCanDream

    axm149 i believe Ke4 is not an actual move played but the digital board caught it after the draw was agreed and arbiter moved the king to the center of the board perhaps because it is indeed a draw before the Ke4 move, black can't force white off the h1 square and so can't promote the rook pawn.

     

    Topalov seems to be resurging again as one of the best players in the world- #4 in the world on the live rankings (2700chess.com) and dominating this tournament!

  • 16 months ago

    HristoProtos

    go TOPA!!!

  • 16 months ago

    Wappinschaw

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 16 months ago

    axm149

    Can somebody please explain me why the Nakamura vs Caruana game ended in a draw? Black was clearly winning (in my opinion..)

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