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N-KB3! Can you read Descriptive Notation?

N-KB3! Can you read Descriptive Notation?

  • Not at all!
  • Sort of - it seems strange though...
  • No problem!
  • Sure! I like it better than algebraic!

Created on June 19, 2012 | 6298 Votes | 69 Comments

Comments


  • 3 months ago

    JPF917

    Don,

    Must be the sun in your city that's gotten to you.  Or, pehaps  they spanked the wrong end a long time ago.  Mayve you don't play in tournaments.  Maybe you're just scared to go have coffee, or even sit down, to talk with to some of the older GM's who first learned in descriptive.  They're human & highly approachable when you don't try to back them into a free chess lesson.  Most also have other interests and love to talk about those interests.

    But, then that ignorence shows in your rudeness.  You thought you wouldn't get a response and, when you did, you decided to try sarcasm which you don't do well either.   Hope you play better than your attempts at communicating.

  • 3 months ago

    pawnkeeper

    JPF917  

    pawnkeeper,

    Some GM's still use it just because it's still allowed in all tounaments.  And, some because it annoys some of the younger alleged "hot shots" who can't read it easily despite hiow easy it is.  Anything for an edge!  If you get your opponent worrying about why your noting the game in Descriptive, you've already won. I bet you ran that survey all by yourself. I'll bet all of those GM "Hot Shots" can read it.

  • 3 months ago

    sea7kenp

    JPF917,

    Thanks for letting me know that Descriptive can still be used in tournaments.  (Yes, I STILL have to "translate" to understand algebraic, ESPECIALLY if I'm playing black.  Yet I can ALMOST play a few moves of blindfold, using Descriptive.  [I started learning how to play without a board, but didn't follow through, or make it a priority]).

    And yes, I can IMAGINE more flexible players gaining an edge, by using Descriptive Notation terms, in whatever is considered allowable patter, during a game.

  • 3 months ago

    JPF917

    pawnkeeper,

    Some GM's still use it just because it's still allowed in all tounaments.  And, some because it annoys some of the younger alleged "hot shots" who can't read it easily despite hiow easy it is.  Anything for an edge!  If you get your opponent worrying about why your noting the game in Descriptive, you've already won.

  • 3 months ago

    pawnkeeper

    dawgface420  

    It's secret code used by old people.

     

    How come GM use it? Aren't most of them young?

  • 10 months ago

    FrodoPiano

    What in the world is that?????????????? Algebraic RLES!!!

  • 12 months ago

    tliu1222

    My chess teacher talked about it while we were on a lesson about how NN and Amateur always lose in chess books.

  • 18 months ago

    wbport

    An early version of Blitz (1978?) used DN.  Blitz played Duchess (fm Duke University) at a conference on the Miss. Gulf coast and I spent the evening at the Duke table translating moves for them.

  • 18 months ago

    sea7kenp

    I grew up with descriptive notation and, even now, have to translate (preferably with a board in front of me) to properly read algebraic (especially if I'm taking the black point of view).  Others have mentioned that computer chess is "almost always" in algebraic.  One notable exception is an old MSDOS game called "Battle Chess".  Anyone know others that use descriptive?  Thank you!

  • 18 months ago

    Ferric

    It seems easier to find similar games in databases or books

  • 19 months ago

    BaganHero

    I learnt that kind of notation after I'd watched "Sherlock Holmes, A game of shadows." I was impressed then I began to like descriptive notation. It makes me feel the real chess battles.... Cool

  • 21 months ago

    Conquistador

    My first few chess books were very old when I started playing chess and they had descriptive notation and algebraic, but in a more archaic form.  For example, for the descriptive notation, a knight is symbolized kt instead of n in modern descriptive.  There are some other differences, but I don't remember them anymore.  Being exposed to both forms, I can read and write them fluently.

  • 21 months ago

    bobyyyy

    From a previous comment: "But, since I'm an historian, it's almost painful to see books by Lasker,  a mathematics professor, who didn't like algebraic notation, translated from descriptive to algebraic.  Same goes for Reshevsky, Reinfeld or Horowitz books."

    I agree. It's terrible to destroy these masterpieces with algebraic notation.

    Before I knew about this post I wrote a post about my love for descriptive notation at http://www.chess.com/forum/view/general/am-i-the-only-chessplayer-in-the-world-who-loves-descriptive-notation

  • 22 months ago

    mydixiewrecked

    5th option:

    Yes, but it's dumb.

  • 22 months ago

    pawnkeeper

    It's probably easier for beginners but algebraic is faster and easier when you get use to it.

  • 22 months ago

    dawgface420

    It's secret code used by old people.

  • 22 months ago

    JPF917

    In answer to Indradip, in descriptive there is a King's side of the board & a Queen's side of the board.  Files are all named for the piece that starts on them. That's the same on both sides of the board.  Rooks, Knights, Bishops Kings and Queens all face each other at the start[ excepting in Fischer Random].    And, each players' ranks are numbered from 1 to 8 from their own point of view.   Since, as  Bobby Fischer asserted back in the 1960's, it's a game of big egos as well as intellect.  From that perspective, numbering from one's own point of view makes considerable sense.

    A Kings rook starts at KR1.  The King's knight  sits on KN1 when it starts so the move you asked about would be N-KB3.  The only other place it could go on the opening move is N-KR3

    In answer to I am a tree, it had nothing to do with multicultural.  It had everything to do  more with speed of matches than anything else.  As blitz became more & more popular, it was just faster to use.  Both work quite well; but, algebraic saves some time when the clock is ticking. 

    And, when intelligent, or semi-intelligent, folks became fascinated with programing computers to play, algebraic became expedient.  Computers being very dumb but very fast machines, it is simpler for them to crunch all the vatiations of a position with an algebraic system.   And with the alleged need for speed, away went most sealed moves [sadly] and  adjudication [don't miss that at all]  But, they're still in the rules too.

    But, since I'm an historian, it's almost painful to see books by Lasker,  a mathematics professor, who didn't like algebraic notation, translated from descriptive to algebraic.  Same goes for Reshevsky, Reinfeld or Horowitz books.  Ah well, I guess chess marches on.  But I do agree with the poster who noted that it is easier to picture the board in my mind with descriptive.

  • 22 months ago

    iamatree

    I think the descriptive is outdated and was updated because chess is international, and algebraic is more multiculturally universal.

  • 22 months ago

    gimmewuchagot

    Well, it's Nf3 for White or Nf6 for Black, and the N-KB3 is only necessary when Nc3 for White or Nc6 for Black are legal moves.

    See why they switched to algebraic? :P

    Anyway, one of the first chess books I picked up (yes, a very old one :P) was in descriptive so I completely understand it, though I dislike using it. (Keeping score would be torture!)

  • 22 months ago

    Indradip_Banerjee

    is it knight from king's side goes to B3..

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