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lasker

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emanuallasker
emanuallasker
Location: Montreal, Canada
Joined: 3/13/14
Last Online: 4/19/14
Points: 0 points
paul-lasker
paul-lasker
Location: San José, El Salvador
Joined: 2/27/14
Last Online: 3/24/14
Points: 0 points
EmanuelSurgeonLasker
EmanuelSurgeonLasker
Location: Barlinek, Poland
Joined: 1/13/14
Last Online: 4/21/14
Points: 0 points
Crazy-Alice
Crazy-Alice
Location: Canada
Joined: 12/22/13
Last Online: 1/7/14
Points: 0 points
The-Lasker-Technique
The-Lasker-Technique
Location: Philippines
Joined: 12/18/13
Last Online: 12/18/13
Points: 0 points

  • Stalemate

    S T A L E M A T E _______________________________________________________      The existing rule has this in its favour, that it appeals strongly to the sporting instincts of mankind; and the last chance which it affords to a player who ap... | Read More

  • The Art of Doing Nothing, Part Two

    In last week's article, we started an analysis of a bizarre game I played ten years ago in the U.S. Championship. The key moment happened around move 15 when, quoting the ChessBase article, Serper "started moving his bishop back and forth between ... | Read More

  • Paul Morphy's Chess Strength

    Paul Morphy, Spring Hill College, 1854      This is a highly unusual article for me.  I have no love for chess engines.  Additionally, I have severe reservations about trying to compare modern players with 19th cenutry players.  It h... | Read More

  • Alexander Alekhine (Part 7): The Dark Years

    In Part Six of this seven-part series, we saw Alekhine lose the World Championship to Max Euwe in 1935, only to win it back in 1937.  After shocking the world (and Euwe, who was sure he would finish Alekhine off once and for all) with that ep... | Read More

  • The Art of Setting Traps

    Most tournament players scoff at the notion of Coffeehouse Chess. Even so, some of the most famous brilliancies in chess history were produced under dubious, non-tournament circumstances: The Immortal Game (Anderssen-Kieseritzky) was played at the... | Read More


    • Who would you carve into the Mount Rushmore of chess?

      I heard an interesting conversational question the other day - "Who would you carve into the Mount Rushmore of X." Where X can be any category of interest - e.g. chess. Naturally, I couldn't help but mull over who my choices would be. I think this... | Read More

      • SamCopeland
      • | Apr 15, 2014
      • | 1265 views
      • | 40 comments
    • PRE-MOVE CHECKLIST

      I found this checklist online on steps to follows BEFORE making your move. PRE-MOVE C H E C K L I S T   1.     Material - Always check the material balance before commencing analysis! (The strategic  implications here are very clear. If ... | Read More

      • CHESSUSA39
      • | Apr 14, 2014
      • | 123 views
      • | 1 comment
    • Thoughts of a 'numerical sports historian'

      I cannot call myself a true historian. Real historical research usually involves much more than a few Google searches and translations. But in sports history, there's a particular niche I took much liking in. It's 'history in numbers' - or 'goals,... | Read More

    • Dominant world champions and more

      Here's a table, based on chessgames.com metrics, of points scored by world champions and other leading grandmasters between each other. By 'leading grandmasters', I mean the following players: Everyone who played a World Championship match Everyo... | Read More

    • March Madness G.O.A.T. (Championship)

      The polling is over!   Capablanca won in an upset! He had a 42% chance to beat Kasparov! Thanks for voting!   March Madness is here for the chess fans!  Instead of predicting which NCAA Hoops teams will advance to the final four you can he... | Read More


Video Lessons



  • Hodges, Albert Beauregard

    • 10 Reads
    • | 10 Reads

    Albert Hodges (1861-1944) was a former U.S. Champion.  His first job was a hidden operator of Ajeeb, the chess automaton, at the Eden Musee in New York..  He played chess and checkers.  He won the US championship in 1894 after defeating Jackson... Read More »

  • Svesnikov

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             The Sveshnikov Variation was pioneered by Evgeny Sveshnikov and Gennadi Timoshchenko in the 1970s. Before their efforts, the variation was called the Lasker–Pelikan Variation. Emanuel Lasker played it once in his world champi... Read More »

  • Coiled Spring Effect

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    The coiled spring effect in chess is related to how a players pieces will start out from a fairly compact and/or cramped opening position, and how they will "unwind" the spring and start attacking with the dynamic energy pent up in the position. A... Read More »

  • ruy lopez (spanish)

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    the ruy lopez is a very old and still awesome opening widly used through the world. E.lasker used it before, and it is still very popular. It is still loved by chess players. Read More »

  • Wing Gambit

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    The term Wing gambit usually refers to when white plays an early b2 to b4 deflecting a black pawn. There are many wing gambits. The first one is the Evan's Gambit, popularized by William Davie Evans. In the 1800's everybody used it and there were ... Read More »