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hardkxre
hardkxre
Location: United States
Joined: 8/26/15
Last Online: 8/28/15
Points: 0 points
rftriumph
rftriumph
Location: kolkata, India
Joined: 8/26/15
Last Online: 8/27/15
Points: 0 points
PawnSacrifice86
PawnSacrifice86
Location: bali, Indonesia
Joined: 8/24/15
Last Online: 8/24/15
Points: 0 points
faltika
faltika
Location: Jakarta, Indonesia
Joined: 8/18/15
Last Online: 8/26/15
Points: 0 points
SIZEUS
SIZEUS
Location: Myanmar
Joined: 8/17/15
Last Online: 8/26/15
Points: 0 points

  • Alekhine's Defense: World Championship Openings

    Alexander Alekhine won the title from Jose Raul Capablanca in their 1927 match. The Franco-Russian master had an unusually wide opening repertoire compared to the earlier champions, and he loved to experiment with different openings. So while A... | Read More

  • Why Do Grandmasters Blunder?

    Over the years I’ve noticed that whenever a grandmaster hangs his face, the masses of fake names go berserk and not only berate the unfortunate player but toss sick (and completely ignorant) accusations his way: “He lost on purpose! It’s a ... | Read More

  • Pete's Pathetic Chess: 'Never Good'

    Chess.com fans have marveled at my uncanny ability to play pathetic chess, and yet win all the same. That won’t be the case today. Unlike the first two games featured in this column, this next game boasts the logical and just conclusion of... | Read More

  • The Rubinstein Maneuver

    "A master cogitates carefully, perhaps a half-hour on a move. Finally, he chooses the correct square for the correct piece and places it there. A grand master is much more skillful. He hardly thinks at all; he throws the piece into the air and it ... | Read More

  • Capablanca's Nimzo-Indian: World Champion Openings

    Like Emanuel Lasker, his successor, Jose Raul Capablanca, was less of a theoretician and more of a keen practical player. Lasker utilized his great psychological understanding and clever trickiness, while Capablanca's skill rested in his innate un... | Read More



Video Lessons


Chessopedia


  • Dutch Defense

    • 0 Reads
    • | 0 Reads

    The Dutch Defense 1. d4 f5 is an attempt to create an imbalance in the position on move one and prepare for a King-side attack by Black. Most common variations are The Classical: 1. d4 f5 2. Nf3 Nf6 3. g3 e6 (and a later d6); The Stonewall: 1. d4 ... Read More »

  • Englund Gambit

    • 0 Reads
    • | 0 Reads

    The Englund Gambit is a rarely played chess opening that starts with the moves: 1. d4 e5?!Black's idea is to avoid the traditional closed queen's pawn games and create an open game with tactical chances, but at the cost of a pawn. The gambi... Read More »

  • Queens Knight Defense

    • 0 Reads
    • | 0 Reads

    The Queen's Knight Defense (also known as the Nimzowitsch Queen Pawn Defence or Bogoljubow–Mikenas Defense) is a chess opening defined by the moves: 1. d4 Nc6Unless the game transposes to another opening, the Encyclopedia of Chess Op... Read More »

  • Castling

    • 98 Reads
    • | 98 Reads

    Castling is the only time in the game when more than one piece may be moved during a turn.  Castling can only occur if there are no pieces standing between the king and the rook.  Neither king nor rook may have moved from its original position.... Read More »

  • London System

    • 0 Reads
    • | 0 Reads

    The London system is a complex chess system in which white develops his bishop on f4 early on, and subsequently develops a closed game pawn structure that would usually limit the Queen's bishop. It is preferable to develop the Queen's Bishop ear... Read More »