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  • 11 months ago

    santiagohart

    Thanks Danny!! I am doing it, like the book analysis thing (@side lines) I tried to do it few times earlier, but now I will do that in a forcing way... 

  • 12 months ago

    IM DanielRensch

    Hurt? No, it won't hurt. But I said, I think practical positions, from real opening structures and middlegames is *more* beneficial than random positions...

    BUT in the interest of improving pure memory and visualization, no, I don't think random positions hurt.

    Danny

  • 12 months ago

    Riv4L

    are you really sure it won't hurt to set up random positions? can it really improve pure visualization? 

  • 12 months ago

    IM DanielRensch

    I think it's a fantastic training tool, and I feel embarrassed Embarassed that I forgot to mention it as a tool in this video series.

    I think it's much more practical and useful to do this with position from real games, ie out of books, looking at a magazine of recent top tournament games, reviewing games in our News Posts, etc. I personally think that it's hard enough trying to reconstruct positions that might have some familiarity to not try and setup random, weird positions.

    But yeah, even setting up "non sensical positions" can't hurt in terms of improving *pure* visualiziation skills.

    Good stuff! Great comment!

    Danny

  • 12 months ago

    Kingalingaling

    Danny, i wonder if in your visualization experience, that u came across the idea that i dubbed years ago : POSITIONAL RECONSTRUCTION. This is a process, whereby u have a position set up, u look it over for a set period of time, then u clear the board and try to set it up exactly as it was. This can be done, for example, by looking at a position set up in a book after, say the 15th move. It can also be done by making a random, crazy, non-chess position and then reconstructing (using two boards is helpful in this case).The practicality of such an exercise is invaluable, e.g. how many times does it happen that players want to review a game, or position, and, after moving the pieces around cannot reconstruct the original position. i know that u mentioned that u should not touch the pieces and do everything in ur head. But if u are working with someone who doesn't do this, they will need to move pieces out of sheer necessity (e.g. reviewing a tournament or blitz game immediately afterwards) i, a coffeehouse and online blitz player encounter this all the time. What are your recommendations for dealing with this scenario, and what do u think of my idea of POSITIONAL RECONSTRUCTION?

  • 12 months ago

    IM DanielRensch

    So many great comments and discussions going on here! Sorry I can't comment on all, but your support is appreciated! I hope everyone visualizes like Kasparov soon ;)

  • 13 months ago

    brankz

    wow

  • 13 months ago

    brankz

    cool stuff.

  • 17 months ago

    asg2

    in puzzle 2, can pawns promote

  • 18 months ago

    Redglove6

    Hands down the best video I've seen on calculation skills.  This is just outstanding.Cool  Danny, I feel like I should write you out a personal check.

  • 20 months ago

    Trojan--Horse

    The second exercise is covered in Andy Soltis book Studying Chess Made Easy pages 132 & 133

    Soltis writes " It was sited by Russian educator Alexey Bartashnikov in 64 magazine"

  • 20 months ago

    pumpupthevolume247

    My short-term memory is nothing compared to my long-term so without any hesitation I can say that I'm no good at this... Tongue Out

    Very interesting video though Danny will there be a part 3? Is there a part 3 already I'm currently catching up on my videos lol Cool

  • 21 months ago

    bjazz

    You missed g7

  • 21 months ago

    towerandlawn

    awesome videos - thanks!

  • 21 months ago

    chess_oliver

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 22 months ago

    abotass

    awesome video!! 

  • 22 months ago

    dweezil28

    danny i really like these two videos. lots of videos are fun and easy and you cater some information to us. spoon feeding us a little bit. because its light and fun. but this you are asking us to do a lot of work. and you believe in it 100%. you can tell you are very passionate about this series.

    i believe too that basically you only get out what you put in, so if people arent getting something out of this, guess what, its not because danny didnt make the video right, its because you didnt put the work in...

    that being said, i have a problem with playing too many games and not doing the right kind of chess study. its my problem and i can own it.  

  • 22 months ago

    chesspartha

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 22 months ago

    maddvlad

    Danny, you realise you just gave away the key to the pandora's box of chess madness. 

  • 22 months ago

    Constantine73

    Do people know about the Blindfold Chess Players group here on Chess.com?  If not, I'd urge you to join.  With the new feature here on Chess.com of being able to hide the pieces on the Live server and play "blindfolded", it's a great way to get some blindfold games in!  We actually going to have our second tournament coming up soon. We only had 5-6 players in the first one, but it was a lot of fun.  The other thing I'll do from time to time is accept a challenge by a lower rated player on Live Chess and play blindfolded...  He/she won't necessarily know that I'm doing this, but its great practice like Danny said.  And IMHO not as hard as you might think!

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