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  • 14 months ago

    Black__Knight

    I just smashed an expert last night at the Marshall Chess Club, positionally. Just by implementing the concepts I've learned by watching these videos. 

  • 19 months ago

    Black__Knight

    f5 and if exf then Nd5 attacks the key defender and opens the long diagonal leading to mating threats such as sacrificing to open the h-file for Rh8 mate.

  • 22 months ago

    kauboy

    what to do after g6? well, the temporary solution of moving the king castle pawn creates the permanent weakness. you just exploit it. The knowledge you have that black has just shot himself in the foot gives you confidence and you continue prosecuting the escalation of threats on the king. As black, your lesson is, don't do this; it's not the answer to your problems.

  • 22 months ago

    kauboy

    A game that could have come from great checkmating attacks of the nineteenth century. A lot can be learned from these older classic books. Some basic principles; which of course, still apply. The Knight on f6 is a vital part of the castled position; a pawn move in front of your castled king is a temporary answer, and a permanent weakness, the game had elements of the King's gambit in it; which was one of the most popular basic arrangements for the attack on the Black castled king. the end game theory is useless if you don't live that long! I love these kind of swashbuckling King's pawn openings that lead to the combinations, the sacrifices, and the surprising mates in the middle game. The two bishops lined up on the Castled King from the other side of the board are classics. It's a kind of list of things you have to prevent and that you don't allow to develop if you want to use your carefully studied end-game theory.

  • 23 months ago

    DutchBagel

    I'm by no means an advanced player, but this helps alot.

  • 2 years ago

    jocheckoh

    very good, nice pace

  • 2 years ago

    manishchess

    Black's move 21:19 why not g5?

  • 2 years ago

    wormtownpaul

    Khachiyan is one of the two or three best video instructors on chess.com.  Too many instructors seem to have drank a quart of Red Bull before doing a session, making the video difficult to comprehend.  Khachiyan and others are very good, not boringly slow, but not impossibly fast either.

  • 2 years ago

    Pinsandforks

    ok.... problem has been solved...This is a very instructive series by GM Melikset Khachiyan THE GREAT!!!Laughing

  • 2 years ago

    Pinsandforks

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 2 years ago

    LastActionxHERO

    Anybody wanting to improve there game should watch this!!! thanks genral

  • 3 years ago

    NM jptica

    Good piece coordination and very instructive.Thank you Maestro Smile

  • 3 years ago

    ChenGJ

    Thanks! The video made me stronger.

  • 3 years ago

    John_smith347

     thanks for the informative well explained video.

  • 3 years ago

    greither

    I liked the coordination of pieces and space in this example.  I am looking forward to the next game.

  • 3 years ago

    John_Rose

    Great series!

  • 3 years ago

    GM GMMelik

    Congratulations to elindauer and chessmonkey00 for right answers.Good job !

  • 3 years ago

    Nezha

    I love this series. IT ROCKS!!!

  • 3 years ago

    dzindzifan

    Great Video once again ... will be doing the homework shortly !! Looking forward to it.  This video and the build up to the attack was definitely old school. Reminds me of Fischer who said that combinations in postions like that are as natural as a baby's smile ... :-)  Thank you for this series!

    Wink

  • 3 years ago

    pumpupthevolume247

    I really loved this game and the analysis! At 09:30 I saw Rd3 would be a really good move it just came into my head - I saw it was better than the more obvious Rf3 because Rf3 blocks the queen... I was actually shocked when it got played 20 seconds later!! I even saw that d5 follow-up could be ignored, but I missed Rh3 - I was looking at Rg3 instead... I guess it's these little subtleties that make these guys some the world's best players!

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