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  • 10 months ago

    pkerichang

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago

    laminat0r

    This might be a stupid  question, but is Qc5 for black an option in the initial position - covering c7 and e7?  It would probably setup a revealed threat for white after Rac1 but it leaves white's pawn blocking the open file and white's knight doesn't have the same set of useful threats...

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    Very interesting position. Somewhat reminiscent of some King's Gambit wide open variations. 

  • 5 years ago

    ChessuBet

                      IM David Pruess      Another enjoyable video, i especially like the last 4 minutes and all the different checkmate variations like the bishop taking away the escape square. The other point that ill take away is how important it is to go on the attack if theres a weakness in your opponents lines even if my pieces may not be fully developed.Look forward to watching the rest of this series and once again thanks for your efforts and helping us to further our abilities in this wonderfulgame!

  • 5 years ago

    waleed_yahia

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 5 years ago

    Muhammad333

    I agree with  LYCAN148. Even though White doesn't mate immidietly (in one variation), being up a queen is enough to win later.

  • 5 years ago

    hanngo

    sorry,actually black doesn't lose everything but only a Q because after Qxg6 black can play h6,but still...

  • 5 years ago

    hanngo

    I've got a question here,in 20:18mWhere you say Qf6 can defend,doesn't this lose to this?

     

  • 5 years ago

    Michele78

    Great video! Trying to calculate the variations was quite challenging but very instructive, and the explanations were excellent

  • 5 years ago

    Michele78

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 5 years ago

    grolich

    Nice video.

    I like it when I'm given things to think about during the lesson too...

     

    Just a couple of things:

    1)one strange (to me) thing is your definition of a "clearly more convincing line":

    On white's choice, you say it's not nearly as convincing because black could have gone for 21...Kg8 22.Re8+ etc. and give the line all the way to 25.Re1 and say: but it's clearly not as convincing as ...

     

    Strange... considering it's a very quick and simple forced mate after that.

     

    2)

    I think there's a big hole in the variation where the knight ends on d6, blocking black's queenside development, and you leave that line quickly afterwards and go back to the other (...Kg8) line.

     

    Looking more closely: after 15...c6 16.Ne7+ Kh8 17.Nf5 why Qg6? 17...Qf6 earns a tempo by attacking the a1 rook. Once it moves, for example 18.Rae1 black got the time to play 18...d5 and it seems the entire evaluation gets overturned

    (black's pieces are getting into the game soon and with tempo on the white bishop, white already has to be careful about ...g6 forking ideas that may become playable soon... and he is still far behind in material).

     

    I have, however, found something interesting. The faulty line I've mentioned gave me an idea, which is based on what seems like a small error in your analysis:

    15...c6 16.Ne7+ Kh8 17.Rh3 h6, you automatically play Nf5. But, what if we use the Rh3 move for a short term pin - 18.Qg5!? now Nf5 is a threat to win the game, with h6 falling:)

    And NOW 18...Qf6 19.Qxf6 gxf6 20.Bd3 threatening mate with Rook Bishop and Knight.

    20...f5 seems forced, but after a couple more forced moves

    21.Rxh6+ Kg7 22.Nf5+ Kg8 NOW your idea from the other line is possible 23.Nd6. Black's queenside development is frozen for the next few moves, after gobbling some kingside pawns. While there are no mating threats here, to me it seems like a magnificent position for white.

     

    Cool video. Very nice. Hope to seen many more of these.

  • 5 years ago

    hamparvaz

    کیری بود :(

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    hi kingsmate,

    my first thought is that on b5 white might try Rad1 first, threatening Ne7+. for example, i don't think bxc4 Ne7+ kh8 Rxd6 cxd6 is ok for black, as white might have Ng6+ fxg6 Qf3 attacking both rooks and winning one of them?

    or Rad1 kh8 (avoiding the check) Nxc7 (now the queen is attacked so i think black needs to play qxc7) Qxc7 Qxf7 (threatening back rank mate, and if Rxf7 Re8++) Qc5 (to defend the rook) Re8 and i think it's all over for black.

    well, these lines i made up blindfold, so if they are wrong let me know, and i can have a look on a board.

    - david

  • 5 years ago

    kingsmate618

  • 5 years ago

    eaglex

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    geer_matt -- giving up the pawns worked in the lines i looked at here after qxe5, but for qd8... you'll have to see parts 2+3.

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    nice find ponyamrand!! i haven't loaded the video yet to get to 20:17, but i think i know which position you mean, white queen on f5 and black plays qf6 trying to trade. but ng6+!!! great pattern; i missed that.

  • 5 years ago

    mschosting

    I play +- the same way as white agains't the sicilian giving all the pawns lol but I always end up drawing the games amazing! :D

  • 5 years ago

    PonyAmRand

    At 20:17 Qf6 isn't a good defense I think. It runs into Ng6+ Qxg6 (hxg6 Rh3+) Qxg6! and hxg followed by Rh3++.

  • 5 years ago

    Ambush

    So giving all your center pawns away for huge play in the middle works! I knew it. Except it never works so well for me : ( Good video though I like the patterns that arose.

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