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  • 9 months ago

    Phlynny

    Audio of very poor quality

  • 4 years ago

    BrieferEHL

    Where are part 1 and 3?

  • 4 years ago

    Lawdoginator

    Thanks, David. 

  • 5 years ago

    aiki2

    thanks as always great video!!

  • 5 years ago

    seanthetrainer

    Oh yes I think I like...for now on call me king hunter :)

  • 5 years ago

    bigcity

    very good

  • 5 years ago

    wizard911

    nice... 

  • 5 years ago

    prakhar-the-best

    IT ROCKS!!!!!!MAN

  • 5 years ago

    NOYPI-_-Ferdz

    good

  • 5 years ago

    apsuhos

    Muhammad, Bg6+ looses the Queen :/

  • 5 years ago

    hitam

    nice

  • 5 years ago

    enpasson

    i would like to see the first video, can you post it on chess.com?

  • 5 years ago

    Muhammad333

    10:58

                  Why not just Bg6+!! Kg8 Qh7+ Kf8 Qxf7#

  • 5 years ago

    CDRobinson

    Views 4219 WinkThanks !?

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    hi grolich, you are right about both variations. as i've said in one or two places in this set of videos: the analysis is so long that it's not even possible for me to fully remember it. i opened up my analysis file just now, and indeed it gives: 16.Qh7+ Kf8 17.Qh6+ Ke7 18.ef+ Kd6 19.Rad1+- without any further comment. as to f4 ng4-- i think there a reasonable point is made that since you can have your bishop on any square on that diagonal, you may as well play Bf5+, controling your opponent's knight's options, and then attack it with f4. also, f4 and rae1 may both win, but rae1 definitely wins in les moves. i mean, when i was looking at the position and calculating, i could see rae1 out to a win on my own but for f4 i moved some pieces to get to the truth. so personally, i think it was useful to point out 1)may as well put the bishop on f5 rather than any other square, since it's then in good relation to the ne5, black's only defender. 2)since ne5 is the key defender, attacking it with a rook or pawn is equally threatening, and so re1 needs to be considered just as much as f4. there are probably four(!) winning paths for white there (qh7+ and chasing; qh6 with immediate f4; qh6 with bf5+ and then Rae1 or f4), but those ideas are still good to take away.

    there are probably a couple similar errors in vids 1, 2, 4, and 5-- either errors in my analysis, or in my remembering of analysis. but if i'm to tackle difficult positions like this without using rybka, that's kind of inevitable. hopefully some people are trying to calculate on their own along the way, like you, and getting very good practice from doing so.

    best, david

  • 5 years ago

    grolich

    Just as the previous video, very nicely done.

     

    As always, I'm going to be picky and point out additions/sub-variations/possible errors in the variations given.

     

    1) You claim you see no win for white after 16.Qxh7. I disagree. There's a very fast and straightforward win in my opinion(also, while the lines are longer, it's easier to calculate than the given solution in my opinion. The moves are very easy to find):

    16.Qxh7+ Kf8 17.Qh6 Ke7 and here was (in my opinion) your error: 18. exf6 (can't give this an exclamation mark. Too simple. The king is executed pretty fast).

    Initially I stopped here. there's nowhere to run. Just quickly checked the main options for surprise defenders...without more defenders, it's over.

    going 18...Ke6 allows 19.Rfe1+ Kd6 20. Qf4+ with a quick execution (20...Re5 then just 21.Rad1 - no escape) and

    18...Kd6 allows 19.Rad1 with nowhere to hide. Anything hat doesn't bring more defenders NOW gets mated quickly, and the rook coming to e5 is simply not enough.

    It seems like there are so many ways to win here.

     

    2) I believe you dismissed the f4 lines for white (as completely winning) too easily, and for a seemingly strange reason (to me). There's a win for white there.

    You only said that you didn't like 18.f4 because 18...Ng4 didn't appeal to you.

    Why? Just one move - 19.Qh5 - and black is lost:) The idea is that after 19...Kg7 20.Qxg4+ and black can't take the bishop (because of Rf3).

     

    Please keep making more interesting videos:)

  • 5 years ago

    IM dpruess

    Anlam-- f5 on which move? after Nd5 Qd8 Qh5? I'm not sure on which move you mean. In that position white would have Nf6+ (from the bishop as well) forcing Kh8 Qxh7++.

  • 5 years ago

    AnlamK

    David, would ...f5 defend for Black?

    Thanks.

  • 5 years ago

    bobobobob101

    lol

    ;lolhxg

  • 5 years ago

    REYES2002

    ES BUENA LA IDEA SIEMPRE Y CUANDO AL CONTRARIO LE INTERESE PIEZAS X POSICION

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