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  • 2 weeks ago

    Wants2improve

    Also, thank you for your series recommendation.  I will definitely check it out.  Happy playing, friend!

  • 2 weeks ago

    Wants2improve

    Right, but how did those openings come to be? In no small part were they developed and refined by brilliant chess players who already had a great aptitude for studdying chess positions (i.e. evaluation and planning... even for the beginning position).  Yes, I understand, those opening videos are essential.  Especially in order to avoid traps and other little things that have been discovered by further study and gameplay.  However, what do you think they are based on? Much of the same stuff discussed here. 

    Do you think that Robert Boyle woke up one morning and exclaimed, "aha! PV=k!" No. That's ridulous. There's a reason why he was able to come up with that... studies and a basic understanding of the relationships between pressure, volume, temperature, and mass.  In this series, we look at the relationships between "the Seven Elements of Evaluation":

    • Pawn structure;
    • Center and space;
    • Your development;
    • The position of your King;
    • Open lines;
    • Material balance;
    • Concrete threats;

    Though perhaps they didn't have the same list or catchy name at the time, the people who came up with today's popular openings and their variations were using these same principles in developing them, were they not?

  • 2 weeks ago

    cdowis75

    This video is not meant to teach opening theory, but positional analysis.  Basically it teaches the middlegame after the book moves have been made.

    There are several videos on openings.  For example, do a video search on the keyword "nemesis".  There are many fine videos on specific openings -- Pirc, King's Indian, etc.

  • 2 weeks ago

    Wants2improve

    Videos like these help me a lot.  I am currently a 1500s player.  I try to study openings by first watching videos that cover the most popular lines.  Obviously, if I'm watching an intro video to a common opening, I'm probably not all that advanced.  However, the videos often make you mostly rely on memorization instead of understanding.  Sometimes, the commentator will even say things like, "clearly improving the position." Not so clearly to me!  It would be easier for me to remember "what" if I can understand "why." Plus, I might know what to look for when someone deviates from the expected moves.  It's like memorizing a math equation without understanding it.  If you don't understand it, you will struggle with the word problems, or, as I call them, real world problems.  Over-the-board chess is full of "real world" chess problems. Thank you.

  • 2 months ago

    abestpcs

    Can you do a video on Pown Structure? I would think this would help me out a lot?

  • 3 months ago

    stanemce

    after rook to c4.if bishop to e2 what will black do?move back or sacrfice

    the exchange?

  • 3 months ago

    stanemce

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 months ago

    mission360

    Thank you for the vedio GM Khachiyan. I learned new principles for Planning and Evaluation from this vedio.Smile

  • 3 months ago

    sacrat

    Good video, but it would have been interstingl to discuss what would have happened after the suggested Nb3 (by instead of Bg3 as played Capa) if black had tried ...Rc3 Rc3 Nd5. I'm a 2000 player, but I had to set the position up on Chessbase and run Houdini to see clearly to the end

  • 3 months ago

    XxBAMFxX

    When opponent does 7... a6 8. c5 is a good response (see Epishin v. Ziatdinov, Philadelphia 1997 and Kotronias-Goldin, Sochi 1989)

  • 3 months ago

    Bhoetrus

    Thank you o great master

  • 4 months ago

    Sine-Nomine

    Thank you for your clarity of thought and excellent presentation!

    Some additional explanations: the game Capablanca-Alekhine analysing by Neil McDonald from his book "Chess Secrets: The Giants of Power Play"



  • 4 months ago

    edward7777

    I am only a 900 player so still a beginner, but its only thorugh the application of insights such as the 7 principles that i will ever progress.  Very insightful. It reminds me of similar instruction that Jeremy Silman includes in his approach e.g. searching for imbalances, etc.  I recommend  Silman's books to any beginner.  You will see that its a tool to assist you in evaluating positions.  Thanks again GM Khachiyan.

  • 4 months ago

    Boomer49

    If a beginer finds this video too hard then they need to simply replay it, pausing where they are puzzled and analyzing that position on a board and then use the computer to check it. Nothing worthwhile in Chess is understood by merely watching it once. Learning involves searching for the answers to your questions which in Chess usually means-'Why did he play that move?' I thought the material was clearly presented. It is up to the student to learn how to apply what is taught.

  • 5 months ago

    ashkan78

    Very instructive series indeed. Thank you very much.

  • 5 months ago

    marcocka

    TKS INDEED.

  • 5 months ago

    deolson809

    Excellent video

  • 5 months ago

    relaxtemps

    thanks of your very helpful video series...

  • 6 months ago

    PastorBen

    a very good  chess instructor..thank  you for sharing your knowledge

  • 6 months ago

    knightkrawlirr

    chess makes sense to me. nothing else does. 

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