Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Comments


  • 11 months ago

    JamesFSDC

    awesome! mr, ginsberg, ill try it in my own game.

  • 11 months ago

    john-warner

    Good coverage of a complex opening!Thanks

  • 2 years ago

    healthybrick

    "We don't let ourselves get pried open"

  • 2 years ago

    healthybrick

    At 18:54, what about Be3 for white?

  • 3 years ago

    jcasey91

    This is something i immediately saw after pawn g4, it may be elementary because i am a relatively new player:

    g4, e5,
    Nb3, bxg4 (or nxg4)
    f3, qh4+

    and white has lost castling rights, also black having threats on the kingside?

    again this may be elementary, i am relatively new (been playing about a year), please explain to me what you think of this. 

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    Sleight says, "I certainly expect your analysis to be better than mine.  I was just proud I found something that seemed better than a perpetual.  Do you agree that 20 ... Bf6 warrants the exclam and is possibly a better try to play for the full point than a perpetual?  That was more my point."

     

    Yes, it is true!  20...Bf6! is stronger than a perpetual!  This Qa5 & Rb8 construction is definitely black's most efficient counterplay and indeed is quite likely to occur OTB.

  • 3 years ago

    Sleight

    I certainly expect your analysis to be better than mine.  I was just proud I found something that seemed better than a perpetual.  Do you agree that 20 ... Bf6 warrants the exclam and is possibly a better try to play for the full point than a perpetual?  That was more my point.  Just this week I faced most of this line and White ended up deviating only a couple moves before this, which makes me consider that it is very possible that this will come up OTB.

     

    Thanks so much for your time and your wonderful videos!

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    From sleight:

     

    "Also, in the video, after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. g4 Nc6 7. g5 Nd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. h4 0-0 10. Qe2 Nde5 11. f4 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Nc6 13. Be3 Qa5 14. 0-0-0 Rb8 15. h5 b5 16. g6 b4 17. gxh7+ Kh8 18. h6 g6 19. Nd5 the sequence 19 ... exd5 20. exd5 Bf6! isn't considered where White must take back the material and suffer after 21. dxc6 Qxa2 22. Bd4 Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Qa1+ 24. Kd2 Qxb2 and Black's advanced b pawn is dangerous. 25. Rxd6 b3 26. Qe4 Bf5 27. Qe5+ Qxe5 28. fxe5 Bxc2 and maybe this drawn but White has to find a lot of tough moves to prove it."

    The conclusion is right, black has the easier time of it.  However in the moves given 26... Bf5? was weak and 27. Bd3! would leave white better.  Correct is 26... Be6! 27. Qe4 and now it appears white barely holds on after 27... Bf5 28. Qe5+ Qxe5 29. dxe5 and white's c6 pawn saves him.   Black also has 26.. Be6! 27. Qe4 Rfe8! keeping annoying pressure or even 27... Kxh7!? with chances for an edge.

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    "transpo

    Mr. Ginsburg,

    Could you please do a video series on the Keres Attack played against the Najdorf/Scheveningen with Kasparov's revised move order playing Black.

    That would truly be a chess cutting edge video series.  I would buy that series after reviewing it.

    Thx."

     

    Dr. Ginsburg is not sure what this is.  I think maybe you mean ...e7-e6 after white's English attack Be3 amd f2-f3 in the Najdorf?  Not really in scope of this material... (?)

     

     

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    "Firepower8

    lol he sounds like a recorder programmed"

     

    LOLsers     If you are talking about the musical instrument the recorder and my voice is a series of dulcet tones, yes I agree.   Now "back to the squares" - let's talk about the chess.

     

     

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    To:

    Sleight

    "What I can't understand is how after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. g4 Nc6 7. g5 Nd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. h4 0-0 the move 10. Qh5 is completely disregarded."

     

    I have faced Qh5 before and it has pros and cons.  Often times black needs to set up a defensive structure with g7-g6 and this often hands black a tempo to do that.  These videos are not exhaustive encyclopedias so it's pretty undertandable to me that overview videos don't include every move.  With the suggested move Qh5 I am not sure how white develops the attack if black simply ignores the queen and plays a6, Qc7, b5, and so on.  I wouldn't regard this as a scare move.

  • 3 years ago

    IM Nezhmet

    To

    BogatyrSvyatogor

    The Chinese Dragon is a Yugoslav Attack Dragon (g7-g6) where Black plays his Rook on a8 to b8, rather than to c8.

  • 3 years ago

    wnnublaiam

    Thank you, that was a nice video lecture. For someone like me, where English is a second language, your style of speaking is much more easier to listen to.  I'll be looking forward to your next lecture.

  • 3 years ago

    Sleight

    What I can't understand is how after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. g4 Nc6 7. g5 Nd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. h4 0-0 the move 10. Qh5 is completely disregarded.  According to my database only GM Polugaevsky has managed not to lose with the subtle 10 ... Re8 but White seems to be doing quite well there.

    Also, in the video, after 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 d6 6. g4 Nc6 7. g5 Nd7 8. Be3 Be7 9. h4 0-0 10. Qe2 Nde5 11. f4 Nxd4 12. Bxd4 Nc6 13. Be3 Qa5 14. 0-0-0 Rb8 15. h5 b5 16. g6 b4 17. gxh7+ Kh8 18. h6 g6 19. Nd5 the sequence 19 ... exd5 20. exd5 Bf6! isn't considered where White must take back the material and suffer after 21. dxc6 Qxa2 22. Bd4 Bxd4 23. Rxd4 Qa1+ 24. Kd2 Qxb2 and Black's advanced b pawn is dangerous. 25. Rxd6 b3 26. Qe4 Bf5 27. Qe5+ Qxe5 28. fxe5 Bxc2 and maybe this drawn but White has to find a lot of tough moves to prove it.

  • 3 years ago

    AlyMohamed

    helpful, thanks

  • 3 years ago

    transpo

    Mr. Ginsburg,

    Could you please do a video series on the Keres Attack played against the Najdorf/Scheveningen with Kasparov's revised move order playing Black.

    That would truly be a chess cutting edge video series.  I would buy that series after reviewing it.

    Thx.

  • 3 years ago

    kapishreshta

    Nice video. Clear, unrushed explanations.

  • 3 years ago

    pumpupthevolume247

    As I play the Scheveningen a lot this lecture was very relevant for my own play. I really enjoyed this lesson it was very easy to digest - great work!

  • 3 years ago

    baddogno

    Such a wonderfully calm and comprehensive coverage of a sharp opening.  Thank you for sharing your expertise in such an accessible manner.   The quality of instruction here on chess.com is truly humbling. 

  • 3 years ago

    shady4life

    Great video. thanks.

Back to Top

Post your reply: