Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Comments


  • 12 months ago

    yenyyenyen

    Great video and thanks for the helpful advice

  • 3 years ago

    Black__Knight

    “Though most people love to look at the games of the great attacking masters, some of the most successful players in history have been the quiet positional players. They slowly grind you down by taking away your space, tying up your pieces, and leaving you with virtually nothing to do!” ~ GM Yasser Seirawan

  • 3 years ago

    dvdempire

    What is it, specifically, about move 8. Be3 that offers a draw?

  • 3 years ago

    chj50

    Game one starts with a Karo Kahn defense. Both white and black generate king side space advantage with a four pawn, pawn chain with white on black squares and black on white squares. White pawn on e5 cramps knight and black square bishop.  Blacks white square bishop on f5, ouside of the pawn chain, is medlesome to a white advance. As the game progresses, they reach a static position with white holding on to his bishops and a space advantage. Black does not want to open up the game on the king side and queen side is cramped. After play, black makes a panic mistake moving king off back rank. White wins.

  • 3 years ago

    nikitanaza

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago

    Sivamaha

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 3 years ago

    Constantine73

    Alex,

    great video with good explanations/analysis.  I like when you stop and give us questions to think about like Danny does in his...

    One little thing (from one foreigner to another) --> 1 tempo...2 tempi  (there's no such thing as "tempis")

    Keep 'em coming,

    C

  • 3 years ago

    jrichman38

    I remember this game it was in The Boardwalk Open in NJ. 

  • 3 years ago

    thijs69

    good video. Thanks.

  • 3 years ago

    elindauer

    I bet Alex can do an amazing Christopher Walken impression.

    In other news, Alcabiates is right.  The problem with exf5 for black is Rxb6!

  • 3 years ago

    shequan

    i like morozevich's way of playing the tarrasch, he makes a waiting move bishop e7. there's also another waiting move a6. another chess.com video told me that committing a knight to f6 before white has moved his knight to f3 can be dangerous because of e5, f6 immediately. there's a line in the tarrasch with the a6 waiting move and an eventual early g5 that I like very much. it surprises people and catches them off guard.

  • 3 years ago

    FM RoyalMaster

    Or even Nf4 instead of Nxe7 is very nice for white

  • 3 years ago

    GM AlexanderL

    hi Alcabiates,

    Yes your analysis make perfect clear sense. Somehow I just blanked out for a minute or so :) Once again, I'm sorry that I didn't really analyze this game in detail with the computer. I didn't think that these moments are in particular as important, but next time it will be better analyzed!

  • 3 years ago

    Alcabiates

    Could it be that in Malakhov-Shulman on exf5 black feared that white might sack the exchange on b6 and then capture on d5 with the knight?

    ...exf5

    Rxb6 Qxb6

    Nxd5 Qe6

    Nxe7 Qxe7+ 

    and white is down the exchange but has two powerful central pawns, bishops on diagonals heading towards black's king and can attack the isolated pawns on a4 and c4?  or is my analysis faulty?

Back to Top

Post your reply: