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  • 6 weeks ago

    Mr-Graph

    @Chessbrute: I assume you mean in the 7. Bf4 line, suggesting that after 7 ... Nd5 8.Nxf7?? is winning. But after 8 ... Qe6+ white will simply be down a piece to a pawn after the queen takes on f7, with a lousy position to boot.

  • 9 months ago

    Black__Knight

    Thank you very much

  • 9 months ago

    sabhijit

    thx

  • 17 months ago

    NM NoRematch

    Here's a PGN of the lecture:



  • 2 years ago

    wormtownpaul

    After 7.Bf4   Nd5   8. Qh5    What do you guys recommend?  There is a killer threat at f7.  There are no games in the chess.com gamebase with this move, so chances are that it's not that strong (I'm only a 1600 player and my chess engine plays this move against me set at 1650). I *think* the best is 8...Nxe5  9.Bxe5  Qb4.  Does that sound right?

  • 3 years ago

    gyrados_2002

    Great Video. Brilliant follow up. No questions asked, the best way to learn this fascinating opening

  • 3 years ago

    chessbrute

    PERLSHTYNE COMPLETELY OVERLOOKS THE DEVASTATING POTENTIAL OF THE KNIGHT CAPTURE OF f7 PAWN WITH A DISCOVERED DOUBLE QUEEN-CHECK (BISHOP IS TAKEN - BUT SO IS THE BLACK ROOK ON H8 - WITH A WHITE KNIGHT ON H8 REMAINIGN AS A SOURCE OF BOTHER FOR BLACK). IN FACT, THIS GM DISMISSED THE DEVASTATING POTENTIAL OF THIS COMBINATION WITHOUT AS MUCH AS A SECOND-THOUGHT! WHITE GAINS A DECISIVE WINNING POSITION AFTER THIS.

  • 3 years ago

    John_Rose

    Following up on Black__Knight's great work, I think it is actually, 1. e4 d5, 2. exd5 Qxd5, 3. Nc3 Qd6, 4. d4 c6 (a key move for Black in either Qa5 or Qd6 Scandinavian), **5. Nf3 Nf6**.  Then White has the options on the 6th move of 6. g3, 6. Be2, 6. h3, or the aggressive 6. Ne5.  Black responds to 6. Ne5 with 6...Nbd7.  Then on move 7 there is the choice of the 3 ways: 7. Nc4, 7. Bf4, or 7. f4, which Black has different ways to respond to....  I think this is how it goes.

  • 3 years ago

    conolol

    Eugene makes reference to the game Anand vs Tiviakov in the Bf4 line where white sacs a pawn with Be2 Qxg2 Bf3 Qg6. And says that Anand did not have enough for the pawn. This is all true, however the line Anand played after Qg6 d5 was the wrong approach to the line.

    White actually has a roaring innitiative after the line Qe2 Qe6 d5 cxd5 0-0-0, where black is dying to survive.

  • 3 years ago

    chessbrute

    Perlshtayn makes a HUGE oversight in not taking into account the potential for complete destruction of Black when White take the f7 pawn and the Rook on h8 in exchange for the black-squared Bishop of White and the eventual capture of the stuck White Knight on h8..... this is not impressive....

  • 3 years ago

    PeeeLeee

    Thanks for the good videos (part 1 and 2) GM Perelshteyn and thanks for posting the notes Black_Knight. Both are very clear. 

     

    Arnold

  • 4 years ago

    Black__Knight

    My notes from Part I & II:

    The Scandinavian Qd6 is as follows: 1.e4 d5, 2.exd5 Qxd5, 3.Nc3 Qd6, 4.d4 c6 and white has 4 main alternatives:

    • 5.Be2 followed by castling. This is easy for black to create his ideal structure, as follows: Bg4, e6, Nbd7, Be7, 0-0
    • 5.g3 this is also easy for black to create his ideal structure. The key for black is to remember to get it's light-squared B outside of his pawn chain. Once the perfect setup has been created, black focuses on playing against white's d4-P.
    • 5.h3 simply develop you B to f5 instead of g4
    • 5.Ne5 is the main line and the only difficult line play; learning the above lines is a piece of cake. From this Ne5 line, white has three main responses:
      •  6.Nc4 - video part I
      •  6.Bf4 - video part II
      •  6.f4 - video part II

    The Nc4 variation: Nc4 Qc7, Qf3

    • White is threatening Bf4 which attacks black's c7-Q. If black ignores this threat and plays e6, white plays Bf4 chasing black's Q to d8 and creating a nice outpost on d6 for white's c4-N.
    • The key move for black is Nb6. The idea is to make the d7-square available for the Q for when black plays Bf4.
    • The idea of having black's Q on d7 is to play Qg4 and exchange Qs and go into the endgame.
    • However, if white exchange Ns and castle's long, playing Qg4 is not advisable; black redirects his attack to the Q-side with: e6, b5, Be7 and 0-0.
    •  Another interesting line is if white returns his c4-N back to e5, then black has Be6 so that now if white plays Bf4 black has Nd4 attacking the f4-B. At this point, it may look like white has a beautiful discover attack with Ng6, attacking black's Q+R, but black has Nxf4 and now whites N is domed after taking the R.
    • The main line for the Nc4 variation: e4 d5, exd5 Qxd5, Nc3 Qd6, d4 Nf6, Nf3 c6, Ne5 Nbd7, Nc4 Qc7, Qf3 Nb6, Bf4 Qd7

    The Bf4 variation: Bg4 Nd5,

    • If white retreats his B to g3, black exchange Ns on c3, exchange Ns e5, followed by Qa3 attacking the hanging c3-P; Now black can simply develops with move such as: Bf5, f6 kicking the B, e6, etc.
    • If white exchanges the Ns on d5, Black takes the N back with his Q.
    1. If white goes for the fastest way to develop with Be2 it's ok for black to take the hanging g2-P but first exchange the Ns on e5.
    2. If white retreats his N to f3, black has Nb6 in order to develop the light-aquared B and to stop P-c4. Now if white keeps developing with Be2 black has Bf5 setting a trap for if white castles
      • If white castles, then black wins a P with Qe4 attacking the f4-B and c2-P.
      • If white plays c3 then black simply develops with e6, Be7, 0-0, and bringing the Rs to the center-files.
    • The main line for the Bf4 variation: e4 d5, exd5 Qxd5, Nc3 Qd6, d4 Nf6, Nf3 c6, Ne5 Nbd7, Bf4 Nd5, Nxd5 Qxd5, Nf3 Nb6, Be2 Bf5, c3 e6 followed by Be7

    The aggrissive f4 variation: f4 Nb6, g4 g6, g5 Nd7 (Eugene Perelshteyn recommendation), Ne4 Qc7, Bg2 Nxe5, fxe5 Bf4 (Be6)

    • For the Be6 line be sure to castle long asap and do not castle short
    • If White makes the mistake of castling on the K-side, then Black is going to play a6 to undermine white's whole K-side, followed by castles on the Q-side without any issues
    • If white plays Qe2 (black 0-0-0) followed by Be3 with the idea to castle long, then black has 2 options:
      • The most natural Bd5 potentially preparing for e6
      • The aggressive Nc4 (ie Nc5 Bd5 and if B's exchange black takes back with his c-P and plays e6 to create a solid P-structure. Now white may try to play e6 first to put pressure on the f8-B but black has the unusual f5; if white exchanges P's with en passant, white leaves himself with a weak e6-P with his c5-N under attack by black's B+Q).

    Some things to remember when playing the Sacndinavian:

    • If white tries Nb5 before black plays c6, black has Qd8 to remove the threat on the Q while protecting the c7-P. Now black can kick the N with c6 unless white tries to add more pressure to the c7-P with Bf4, but then black has Nd5 to attack white's f4-B while providing the needed additional support for the c7-P.
    • The objective of the Scandinavian is to lure the white's N to c3 and makes it become a neusense for white.
    • Remember to immediately challenges white's e5-N with Nd7.
    • Before playing Nbd7 alway make sure that white can't trap you Q with Bf4
  • 4 years ago

    Gagandeep91

    gud1

  • 5 years ago

    drowzee1872

    I am finding the Scandinavian with Qd6 is being played quite a lot now at club level. So the surprise element has gone somewhat.

    Is there going to be a continuation of this series? What about the Modern Scandianvian lines....

  • 5 years ago

    HydroTherapy1952

    Really enjoyed both parts - I plan to add this opening to alternate with my Sicilian and I have also been looking at the Caro-Kann so this is a nice compliment to that line.

    Thanks for this lesson.

  • 5 years ago

    chessdavidwu

    [COMMENT DELETED]

  • 5 years ago

    robbert1975

    thanks a lot! Very interesting material.

  • 5 years ago

    metalpawn

    excellent guide !!!  thanks GM

  • 5 years ago

    Mischa

    In the Anand example black cannot really be better?  Its true that Anand played 12.d5 and got less than nothing ( video stopped one move short here ), but 12.Qe2! is very strong.  Black wants to exchange bishops with 12...h5, but white has 13.h3.  I just think this position is very complicated and difficult to play.

  • 5 years ago

    Io-Annou

    Thanks I really enjoyed this!

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