Upgrade to Chess.com Premium!

Comments


  • 6 days ago

    john-warner

    Nice clear video!

  • 5 months ago

    vrdilac

    222

  • 9 months ago

    IM dpruess

    :-)

  • 9 months ago

    bartiscool

    Thanks

  • 9 months ago

    bartiscool

    Nice

  • 17 months ago

    renebonilla1969

    Thank you...I have decided to actually study the game now, so that my performance and enjoyment and understanding of the will improve. This "basic video" has opened my eyes...Thank you again...

  • 19 months ago

    Frenzic

    thanks

  • 21 months ago

    rastalion

    Thankyou, from a grateful beginner, very helpful : )

  • 2 years ago

    IM dpruess

    it is there. (if you are talking about this http://www.chess.com/article/view/video-guide )

    it's in the strategy section, and the series is "playing with a space advantage"

  • 2 years ago

    irWietje

    Is it possible to put this series in the video guide? It is much more helpful to study if things are put together there, I only accidentally found this video and think it is so great it needs more attention (just like the rest of the series on working with space adv)

  • 2 years ago

    IM dpruess

    great!

  • 2 years ago

    tigergutt

    its the clearest explanation of space i have seen. thanks

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    yeah, or like judging other things in chess. i put my knight on a good square, and then i ask: how much is this knight worth? one person says 3.2; another says 3; yet another says 3.06, and another says 3.6. it's not easy to judge, but it still has meaning, and we can try to refine our ability to make accurate judgments.

    :-)

  • 3 years ago

    hvacstudent

    So it's like judging beauty: there are enough commonalities in people's perspectives to say there is a consensus on what is or is not beautiful, but the consensus isn't absolute.[/philosophical]

    If you let the above analysis stand, I'll consider myself to have comprehended the element of space.  Thanks again for your timely responses.

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    sort of. but i would say the fact that it depends on your judgment, and that there are nuances does not make it entirely subjective. if you there is an undefended square on b5, that you could put your knight on, and your opponent has a pawn on a7, you have to ask yourself if it's good or bad for the opponent to play a7-a6. if it's really bad for him, you can consider b5 to be yours. if it's really good for him, don't count b5 at all. if it has pluses and minuses, then i count b5 as about half a square.

  • 3 years ago

    hvacstudent

    dpruess,

    Thank you for your timely response.  Your proposed definition seems to make space subjective to each individual player's criteria for a "safe" square, but you add that my flawed-yet-objective definition works for nearly all situations.  Is that what you're trying to say?

     

    [Edit: Corrected my mistake in spelling your username.]

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    hvacstudent, sorry for the confusion, you raise a very good point, which i was in fact trying to make, but probably not sufficiently explicitly.

    the nature of space changes if one player's pieces are able to get behind the opponent's pawns. this is extremely rare in the middlegame, so for most practical purposes your definition of space is correct for the middlegame. in the endgame, you are not infrequently able to get behind the other person's pawns, and then as you've noted your pieces become very strong as they have access to lots and lots of safe squares.

    sometimes in an endgame, the board is more locked, and you can still keep the opponent's pieces from getting behind your pawns. in that case, you still maintain your "space advantage" in the endgame. this is why in some endgames it's an advantage to have more advanced pawns (more space) and in some it's a disadvantage (your pawns are not limiting the opponent's pieces, but instead are vulnerable to attack from behind).

    so, let's try to provide an over-arching definition: space is generally speaking the number of squares on which your pieces can sit safely. in the case of squares that the opponent is not attacking, but could easily attack, you have to use your judgment to evaluate how much use you are able to make of that square. thus your space vs. your opponent's space is not a simple integer, but an estimation of how many squares your pieces can use.

    does that help?

  • 3 years ago

    hvacstudent

    I watched this video three times but still don't understand what space is.  The first board seems to suggest that space is any place a piece can eventually move to without risk of immediate capture, since some of the highlighted spaces already had friendly pieces on them.  But the final board doesn't allow for that interpretation because the unoccupied area beneath white's pawns didn't count as space for black's king.

  • 3 years ago

    IM dpruess

    :-)

  • 3 years ago

    FerociousResolve

    thank you for this series on space...most helpful... will be watching them a few times and working away furiously on my notes... rock on, you generous beast!

Back to Top

Post your reply: