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  • 13 months ago

    kantifields

    It says advanced.

  • 14 months ago

    marsiozo

    I agree with strob88 -- slow down dude....

    totally missing the point with going through moves so fast and regard it as 'common theory' ...

    most of us are here to learn...

  • 15 months ago

    Strobs88

    Please slow down in your analysis, and ask more questions to the audience.  We're not all grandmasters.

  • 19 months ago

    AleSGCHESS

    Amazing videos man, thanks!

  • 20 months ago

    Argonaut13

    Very nice video. Inspirational and motivating

  • 23 months ago

    PUNTHAMURRA

    Thnx for the lesson Lenderman

  • 2 years ago

    jonathansfirstacount

    intresting please do more

  • 2 years ago

    pumpupthevolume247

    Fast-paced but amazing games - no wonder Magnus Carlsen is the World #1 with aggressive and "hungry" play like this!

  • 2 years ago

    OmegaBlue

    A great help! Thanks for the video.

  • 2 years ago

    Vally77

    At 18:57 why can't white win if he makes the queen?Sure it will remain king and rook vs king and 2 pawns.Is this a position from which you can't win?

  • 2 years ago

    Eternity_08

    Well done! Victory from very small advantage! Smile

  • 2 years ago

    orestesmantra

    Nice presentation. Enjoyed the video. Carlsen is a beast!

  • 2 years ago

    Wzntz

    Great work

  • 2 years ago

    ienj0ychess

    Thanks for the enjoyable video! That was a very instructive demonstration of endgame technique.

  • 2 years ago

    RyanMurphy5

    The Radjobov game was featured in a recent article by G Serper.  Good lecture!

  • 2 years ago

    jdm

    Another great video.

    I'm still enjoying "The Kings of New York".

  • 2 years ago

    gstillman

    pride is a sin

  • 2 years ago

    jessegoldman

    I'm proud tha youre norwegian too.

  • 2 years ago

    Roger1892

    I'm proud to be Norwegian. Cool

  • 2 years ago

    etourneau

    Kramnik, Aronian etc. are all products of the Russian school, they don't like risk. Kasparov was an exception.

    It may sound like a sweeping generalization and indeed it is, but if you look at the recently finished Russian championship, it was something like 75% draws...

    The risk with playing on such games is that by pressing too hard you may even lose, and if it is a draw anyway you just wasted time and energy.

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